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By Jacques Kelly | March 9, 1992
The other day a friend remarked that she still has a working 1940s Western Electric telephone in her home. It's as heavy as granite. The rotary dial is metal, not plastic. People under 40 ask, "Does it work?"This phone shouldn't be considered an antique but a status symbol. It takes its place with our lump-meat crab cakes and shad roe suppers as some of the things that make Baltimore the town it is.If you look around the town, you can spot other things that serve for status symbols on the shores of the Patapsco:Your name on an outdoor homestretch box at Pimlico not far from the finish line.
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BUSINESS
By SCOTT CALVERT and SCOTT CALVERT,SUN FOREIGN REPORTER | October 26, 2005
Johannesburg, South Africa -- When Nomzamo Fihla decided she needed a new car that would be more reliable than her balky Volkswagen, she joined the huge wave of black South Africans pushing car sales - and especially sales of luxury models - to record heights. Fihla, an operations manager in her 20s at a government call center, eventually decided on a jet-black, $40,000 BMW. It is much like her boyfriend's. And much like the prized status symbol of thousands of other black South Africans.
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FEATURES
By Judy Rose and Judy Rose,Knight-Ridder News Service | January 2, 1994
Grand pianos aren't just for music anymore. They're the new decorating status symbol of the '90s.They are the element that puts prestige in today's living room, the item that demonstrates you are a cultured person. For people with large rooms and large checkbooks, the grand piano is the new version of past years' sculpture and bookshelves."I love the weight it gives to the room -- the size and the bulk," says Grosse Pointe Farms, Mich., interior designer D. J. Kennedy. "It helps settle down a room."
NEWS
June 3, 2004
THE SCALPEL of youth has a new target: the voice box. But buyer beware. Trouble was, after the tummy tucks, butt lift, Botox and jowl trim, those seeking to stall the outward evidence of long living still had a dead giveaway. Like much of the rest of the body, vocal cords start to sag a bit with age, which in women leads to ever-deeper pitch while men grow squeakier. So how about a voice lift? Should basic voice therapy prove unacceptable, surgeons can insert implants that push the vocal cords closer together, or inject fat or collagen into the cords.
FEATURES
By Alice Steinbach | June 25, 1997
PARIS -- It is just before 11 in the morning and already shoppers are crowding into the legendary store known as Hermes. From around the world they have come -- these devotees of the Hermes mystique -- with only one thing on their minds: to leave this chic shop on the rue du Faubourg Saint-Honore with the perfect Paris status symbol -- a $275 silk Hermes scarf.Forget for the moment the fabled leather handbags and sublimely crafted gloves, the enamel bangle bracelets and silk ties that are also a part of the Hermes oeuvre; right now the action is at the scarf counter.
BUSINESS
By SCOTT CALVERT and SCOTT CALVERT,SUN FOREIGN REPORTER | October 26, 2005
Johannesburg, South Africa -- When Nomzamo Fihla decided she needed a new car that would be more reliable than her balky Volkswagen, she joined the huge wave of black South Africans pushing car sales - and especially sales of luxury models - to record heights. Fihla, an operations manager in her 20s at a government call center, eventually decided on a jet-black, $40,000 BMW. It is much like her boyfriend's. And much like the prized status symbol of thousands of other black South Africans.
NEWS
June 3, 2004
THE SCALPEL of youth has a new target: the voice box. But buyer beware. Trouble was, after the tummy tucks, butt lift, Botox and jowl trim, those seeking to stall the outward evidence of long living still had a dead giveaway. Like much of the rest of the body, vocal cords start to sag a bit with age, which in women leads to ever-deeper pitch while men grow squeakier. So how about a voice lift? Should basic voice therapy prove unacceptable, surgeons can insert implants that push the vocal cords closer together, or inject fat or collagen into the cords.
FEATURES
By Elaine Louie and Elaine Louie,N.Y. Times News Service | November 7, 1990
This fall, some fake furs come disguised as Persian lamb, rabbit, fox, mink, mouton, beaver, leopard and tiger. Others are dyed in strange hues pale blue, red, purple, pumpkin, pomegranate, silvery grey, pinky beige as well as in black, brown and taupe.In these colors, the coats do not resemble any animals but only what they are -- acrylic pile. They come short and long and can be as frivolous as a stole or as useful as a 1920s-style ankle-length coat of navy blue wool and cashmere, edged in dark brown "mouton."
NEWS
By TaNoah Morgan and TaNoah Morgan,SUN STAFF | January 24, 1999
The hunters at the Meade Natural Heritage Association are stewing over a theft.Two stuffed deer heads -- one nicknamed Old Folks -- had hung on the walls inside the Patuxent Wildlife Refuge hunting control station for more than a decade as a monument to the skills of hunters Golden "Bill" Williams and Roger Francis.A thief forced in a rear window at the station during the Christmas holiday, passed over the television, videocassette recorder, computer and radios and took the deer heads, wounding the hunters' egos.
BUSINESS
By Gary Dymski and Gary Dymski,NEWSDAY | October 26, 2003
As Americans continue to spend money on improving, expanding and upgrading to larger homes, the driveway has become a featured element of landscape design. Big houses often call for grand driveways - in courtyards, estate-like curves and grand circles - with price tags from $10,000 to $100,000. For some homeowners, large driveways provide a surprising measure of seclusion and the pride of visual presentation. For others, the end of a long driveway signals a grand welcome, like rolling out a red carpet that leads visitors to the front door.
BUSINESS
By Susan L. Towers and Susan L. Towers,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | December 7, 2003
It used to be that the homes of the rich and famous were known for their Picassos and Renoirs, their hand-made Persian carpets and their priceless European antiques. Now, the new artwork of the higher-priced homes might be the glassed-in sunroom. Real estate experts say the elaborate additions have grown more popular in recent years because of the recent growth of the sunroom market. Homebuilders and contractors report growing interest in such rooms and say prices can range from $12,000 to more than $1 million.
BUSINESS
By Gary Dymski and Gary Dymski,NEWSDAY | October 26, 2003
As Americans continue to spend money on improving, expanding and upgrading to larger homes, the driveway has become a featured element of landscape design. Big houses often call for grand driveways - in courtyards, estate-like curves and grand circles - with price tags from $10,000 to $100,000. For some homeowners, large driveways provide a surprising measure of seclusion and the pride of visual presentation. For others, the end of a long driveway signals a grand welcome, like rolling out a red carpet that leads visitors to the front door.
NEWS
By Frank Langfitt and By Frank Langfitt,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | December 26, 2001
BEIJING - When people think of skiing, Beijing doesn't immediately spring to mind. The Chinese capital is crowded with 13 million people, and winter usually brings less than an inch of precipitation. But here was Li Huayun, the bespectacled chief of a state-owned radio communications company, standing atop a 1,090-yard ski run just north of the capital, participating in the most fashionable winter sport in the world's most populous country. "It's like floating," Li said with a grin, glancing down at the scores of skiers sliding around the foot of the mountain.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Christine Frey and Christine Frey,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | November 19, 2001
Don Richardson's tiny new cell phone turned out to be more cumbersome than convenient. About the size of a candy bar, the phone fit neatly in his pocket, but Richardson always hit too many buttons at once and the mouthpiece ended up in the middle of his cheek. Frustrated, the 6-foot, 7-inch postmaster from Los Angeles finally ditched the dinky device in favor of a model with bigger buttons and a mouthpiece that reached his mouth. "I'm big," he said. "Everything I buy is big." Most of the technological gear around him is small - and getting smaller.
NEWS
By TaNoah Morgan and TaNoah Morgan,SUN STAFF | January 24, 1999
The hunters at the Meade Natural Heritage Association are stewing over a theft.Two stuffed deer heads -- one nicknamed Old Folks -- had hung on the walls inside the Patuxent Wildlife Refuge hunting control station for more than a decade as a monument to the skills of hunters Golden "Bill" Williams and Roger Francis.A thief forced in a rear window at the station during the Christmas holiday, passed over the television, videocassette recorder, computer and radios and took the deer heads, wounding the hunters' egos.
NEWS
By Sam Quinones and Sam Quinones,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | March 5, 1998
TOTOLAN, Mexico -- In this stone-broke village in the state of Michoacan, where horses and donkeys meander rocky streets and the morning cock's crow rings everywhere, Refugio Sanchez is testament to what is probably the most sweeping privately financed urban renewal project on the North American continent.Not that it seems that grandiose at this level.Sanchez is building a duplex for two of his single sons, Gerardo and Hugo. It is made of brick and concrete, with arching entrances and wrought-iron gates.
NEWS
By Frank Langfitt and By Frank Langfitt,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | December 26, 2001
BEIJING - When people think of skiing, Beijing doesn't immediately spring to mind. The Chinese capital is crowded with 13 million people, and winter usually brings less than an inch of precipitation. But here was Li Huayun, the bespectacled chief of a state-owned radio communications company, standing atop a 1,090-yard ski run just north of the capital, participating in the most fashionable winter sport in the world's most populous country. "It's like floating," Li said with a grin, glancing down at the scores of skiers sliding around the foot of the mountain.
FEATURES
By Roy H. Campbell and Roy H. Campbell,KNIGHT-RIDDER NEWS SERVICE | June 19, 1997
Time was when the term "golf fashion" was an oxymoron.Golf clothes, those geeky plaid ensembles seemingly designed for old codgers, were about as unfashionable as divots on a putting green.And who, except those who actually knew how to blast their way out of a sand trap, really wanted to walk around looking like a golfer anyway?But that was all B.T. -- Before Tiger.Since the young golf sensation Tiger Woods drove, chipped and putted his way to superstardom, breaking records, drawing huge galleries, winning the Masters, all of sudden, the look of the links is more than just hip. It's what's happening.
FEATURES
By Alice Steinbach | June 25, 1997
PARIS -- It is just before 11 in the morning and already shoppers are crowding into the legendary store known as Hermes. From around the world they have come -- these devotees of the Hermes mystique -- with only one thing on their minds: to leave this chic shop on the rue du Faubourg Saint-Honore with the perfect Paris status symbol -- a $275 silk Hermes scarf.Forget for the moment the fabled leather handbags and sublimely crafted gloves, the enamel bangle bracelets and silk ties that are also a part of the Hermes oeuvre; right now the action is at the scarf counter.
FEATURES
By Roy H. Campbell and Roy H. Campbell,KNIGHT-RIDDER NEWS SERVICE | June 19, 1997
Time was when the term "golf fashion" was an oxymoron.Golf clothes, those geeky plaid ensembles seemingly designed for old codgers, were about as unfashionable as divots on a putting green.And who, except those who actually knew how to blast their way out of a sand trap, really wanted to walk around looking like a golfer anyway?But that was all B.T. -- Before Tiger.Since the young golf sensation Tiger Woods drove, chipped and putted his way to superstardom, breaking records, drawing huge galleries, winning the Masters, all of sudden, the look of the links is more than just hip. It's what's happening.
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