Advertisement
HomeCollectionsStatus Quo
IN THE NEWS

Status Quo

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
May 13, 2014
I hear the Washington Post endorsed Lt. Gov. Anthony Brown, calling him the paragon of the status quo ( "Anthony Brown for Maryland governor ," May 10). With friends like that, who needs enemies? The characterization is remarkably apt - and devastating. Maryland is not in good shape. Too many people are still unemployed, too many who have gone through training cannot get jobs they were trained for, too many who are thankful to have a job still worry about whether their children are adequately cared for while they are at work.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
August 5, 2014
NFL Commissioner Roger Goodell defends his decision on the two-game suspension of Ray Rice by citing the need to remain "consistent" with like violations regarding domestic violence ( "Roger Goodell defends two-game suspension of Ravens' Ray Rice," Aug. 2). He states the NFL takes the issue of domestic violence "seriously. " In his position of leadership, remaining "consistent" only maintains the league's status quo regarding its weak stance on domestic violence. Stronger action by Mr. Goodell would have sent the clear message to NFL players, management, staff and fans that the league is willing to take a societal leadership role, as a major entertainment employer, in an effort to eliminate domestic violence.
Advertisement
NEWS
January 31, 2013
Over dinner the other day with a new acquaintance, the topic of food and ethics (and thus vegetarianism) came up. My new acquaintance, Mr. W., is about 60 pounds overweight and was enjoying an oversized cheeseburger on a white bun with a side of fries. He informed me, in all seriousness, that vegetarian diets are risky due to the likelihood of nutrient deficiency. Had Mr. W. read the recent article in The Sun ("Tips on switching to a vegan diet," Jan. 24), he may have cited it as evidence to support his claim.
NEWS
By Jonah Goldberg | August 4, 2014
Let us now praise Democratic hypocrisy. Throughout my life, various Republicans have suggested amending the Constitution in one way or another. A few years ago, they suggested revising the 14th Amendment to get rid of automatic birthright citizenship. Before that, some proposed amending the Constitution to lock in the traditional definition of marriage. Ronald Reagan wanted a presidential line-item veto added to the Constitution. On nearly every occasion, Democrats opposed such efforts, not just on the merits but on the puffed-up principle that we mustn't "tinker" or "tamper" with the genius of the Founding Fathers' constitutional design.
FEATURES
By Scot Lehigh and Scot Lehigh,BOSTON GLOBE | September 28, 1997
Robert Reich, President Clinton's former labor secretary, and Jeff Faux, president of the Economic Policy Institute, have written cogent critiques of the Democratic status quo in the November-December issue of American Prospect. "How the debate is framed -- what options are put before the public -- makes all the difference," writes Reich, who contends that Democratic timidity has, in a few short years, telescoped the debate from the high purpose of whether to provide universal health care to a wrangle on Republican turf over how taxes should best be cut.Why has the Democratic Party become so quiescent?
NEWS
December 15, 2004
IN TAIWAN'S legislative elections last weekend, the island's voters handed their president a setback, Beijing's saber-rattlers a victory, and a caught-in-the-middle United States at least a temporary reprieve from escalating cross-strait tensions. Having earlier this year voted their pro-independence President Chen Shui-bian a second term, Taiwanese voters had been expected to accord his Democratic Progressive Party a parliamentary majority. And Mr. Chen then was expected to proceed toward attempting to rewrite the Republic of China's constitution and perhaps even the island's political name to reflect in law its growing de facto independence from China -- potential moves prompting increasingly credible military threats from Beijing.
NEWS
March 31, 1992
Bush administration foreign policy started out as a "status quo-plus" operation, with the emphasis on status quo, and more than three years later the description still fits. Well, let's make it "status quo-plus-plus-plus." The Bush-Baker-Scowcroft team did pull off the gulf war, seize the moment on German reunification and push Middle East negotiations. But on the whole this administration was and remains as compulsively cautious as any American government could be.This week, after months of hesitation, President Bush will unveil his plan for long-range economic support for the tottering states of the former Soviet Union.
NEWS
By Mohammad Tarbusha | September 20, 1990
IN CLASSICAL antiquity, the Stoic doctrine advocated that if a completely new beginning is to be made, nothing of the old must remain.Fortunately, one does not have to be a Stoicist, nor even a political philosopher, to see today that the status quo now prevailing in the Middle East cannot be sustained.There are now about 200 million Arabs dispersed in 22 heterogenous states. A high percentage of them still live below subsistence level, while few thousand have wealth that neither they nor their descendants could ever live long enough to spend.
NEWS
By Patsy Allen | November 3, 2006
Three political parties in Maryland, the Green, Libertarian and Populist parties, have done something highly unusual in U.S. political history: We have nominated the same candidate for the U.S. Senate, Kevin Zeese. This "Unity Campaign" is also supported by Democrats, Republicans and independents. Why? Our country is facing serious problems not being addressed by the status quo parties. Our economy is at risk from massive trade deficits, record federal deficits, a constantly rising U.S. debt and record-high personal debt.
NEWS
By DAN RODRICKS | September 9, 2007
Well, we're not getting Bloomberg. Fuhgedaboutit. He's mayor of New York and, while he's donated a ton of money to the Johns Hopkins University, his alma mater, he's not about to pull up stakes, establish residency in Baltimore and run for mayor here. He's far more likely to run for the White House. So we're not getting Bloomberg. (And the Orioles probably won't be getting A-Rod if he opts out of his Yankees contract, either.) Day after tomorrow, there's an election in the City of Baltimore, where Democrats rule and the winner of the party's ho-hum 2007 primary will be the next mayor.
NEWS
June 19, 2014
In talking to fellow Baltimoreans the conversation often turns to our growing dissatisfaction with city institutions. Our elected public officials and agencies too often fail to seriously address the challenges of the day, and our schools continue to rank last in the state. The police department soaks up an ever-growing share of the budget with little to show in terms of results, and employment opportunities evade far too many of our citizens. And now we even have to question the attentiveness of our last remaining daily newspaper.
NEWS
By Erin Cox, The Baltimore Sun | February 21, 2014
Attorney General Douglas F. Gansler took the stage at a Baltimore forum this week trailing in the polls, his fundraising advantage erased and big challenges ahead in his campaign for governor. "Let me start by defining who I am - or who I like to believe I am," Gansler told the audience. Political experts say Gansler should have done that months ago, after spending the early stage of the campaign responding to a string of controversies and letting his opponents define him instead.
NEWS
November 4, 2013
While it's not uncommon for any negotiation to begin with a degree of doubt, it's difficult to imagine any launched with as little optimism as accompanied the opening last week of federal budget talks. That President Barack Obama could possibly still be voicing any expectation of a "grand bargain" reaching far into the future suggests an outlook shared only by those who play multi-state lotteries and bet the pick six at the race track. For all the derision and falling poll numbers that Congress, and particularly the Republicans, suffered during last month's government shutdown and near-default that began with a desire to "defund" Obamacare but later spread to the overall budget and beyond, the party's basic positions on tax and spending fundamentals look little changed.
NEWS
By Stephanie Rawlings-Blake | October 1, 2013
Over the past few days, as I have worked to prepare my newly minted fifth grader for school each day, the question of who should lead Baltimore City Public Schools has been on my mind. As a mother blessed with the opportunity to serve as mayor, finding the right schools CEO is of particular importance to me. I work every day to ensure every child in Baltimore is afforded the same opportunities I want for my own child. Next to making sure our communities are as safe as possible, this is the most sacred duty I hold.
NEWS
By Tricia Bishop, The Baltimore Sun | August 9, 2013
Morgan State University is trying to raise $300,000 in donations by the end of the month to give 300 undergraduates emergency scholarships — the result of tighter lending standards that have hit historically black colleges and universities particularly hard. The universities blame changes to the Parent PLUS Loans, which allow holders to borrow the full cost of tuition, fees and living expenses. More loans were denied after credit history requirements were made stricter in late 2011.
NEWS
Dan Rodricks | July 31, 2013
I actually thought the cool new pope would have something cool and new to say about one of the things that make it hard to be a Roman Catholic: the church's refusal to allow women to serve as priests. Pope Francis has all the makings of a revolutionary. In just a few months on the job, he has excited otherwise bored and jaded Catholics with a fresh approach to the papacy, preaching from the book of humility, simplicity and passionate concern for the poor. Then he went down to Brazil, where the church has lost millions of followers, and criticized leaders there for allowing an "exodus" to other faiths or to the secular life.
NEWS
March 6, 1998
An excerpt from a recent Orange County Register editorial:RECKLESSNESS, apparently, is in the eye of the beholder. President Clinton, for instance, professed Monday to see recklessness in a GOP congressional proposal to sunset the current federal tax code as of the final day of 2001 -- so as to force work to begin soon on a replacement.Mr. Clinton denounced the idea without qualification, charging that the plan could disrupt the economy by creating a crippling uncertainty about future tax policies.
NEWS
By MICHAEL DRESSER and MICHAEL DRESSER,getting.there@baltsun.com | December 15, 2008
In the protracted debate over whether and how to build the transit project known as the Red Line, one compelling issue has been all but lost: the miserable status quo. For decades, the main transportation corridor through West Baltimore has been six-lane U.S. 40, known for much of its length as Edmondson Avenue. Each weekday morning, hordes of commuters from Catonsville, Ellicott City and other places to the west invade West Baltimore on their way downtown. Each weekday evening, they alternately race and crawl through the same neighborhoods, leaving nothing behind but their exhaust fumes.
NEWS
Dan Rodricks | June 14, 2013
The American clock brings us to the 50th anniversaries of two extraordinary events involving two extraordinary women, Gloria Richardson Dandridge and Madalyn Murray O'Hair — both strong-willed champions of liberty and disturbers of the status quo, but women of very different character, purpose and legacy. One is now 91 years old, long esteemed as a brave civil rights leader who refused to smile on demand and who famously brushed away a bayonet. The other was a noisy atheist, reviled as the most hated woman in America; she died a violent death nearly two decades ago. This month marks 50 years since the race riots in Cambridge, the small city on Maryland's Eastern Shore that became a crucible for civil rights in 1963.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.