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Status Of Women

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By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | April 11, 1999
UNITED NATIONS -- A consensus reached at a 180-nation conference in Cairo, Egypt, five years ago on a new strategy for limiting world population growth by improving the status of women is facing serious religious, ideological and financial difficulties.The strategy would allow the world's population to rise from its present level of about 5.9 billion people to close to 9.8 billion by the year 2050, and then hold it at around that level.But a review conference convened here at the end of last month to see what progress countries were making toward the Cairo goals broke up with barely half its work completed.
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NEWS
By Alissa J. Rubin and Alissa J. Rubin,Los Angeles Times | January 21, 2007
Kabul, Afghanistan -- Each morning, the policewoman puts on her uniform, goes to her precinct office, sits behind a bare desk. And waits. She is one of several officers appointed to make it easier for women to report domestic violence. Her job ought to be one of the busiest in the district. Instead, Pushtoon, who goes by one name, has one of the loneliest. "Last week we had one woman. Before that there had not been anyone for several weeks," she said, twisting hands left scarred by her attempt at suicide years ago in a Taliban jail.
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NEWS
September 4, 1997
Lucy Somerville Howorth,102, a lawyer and longtime fighter for women's rights, died Aug. 23 in Cleveland, Miss. Mrs. Howorth was a pioneer in the women's movement, breaking ground in her Mississippi and becoming a major political player in Washington.In 1961, she was named adviser to the President's Commission on the Status of Women. She joined the forerunner of the American Association of University Women in 1918. She was among the first female appointees by President Franklin D. Roosevelt to the Board of Veterans Appeals.
NEWS
October 24, 2005
IN WASHINGTON, where political and social climbers are ubiquitous, FOB was once a witty reference to the elite community of Friends of Bill - as in Bill Clinton. People measured their importance by their closeness to the president. FOB is a different shorthand within the Bush administration. Friends of Bush don't just occasionally revel in the president's limelight at White House dinners or high-priced political fundraisers, they get to help run the country, hold key Cabinet jobs, lead vital federal agencies, and possibly sit on the Supreme Court - even if their qualifications are thin.
FEATURES
By Michael Hill | January 3, 1991
Masterpiece Theatre checks in Sunday night with an extraordinary one-part, one-hour, one-woman show as Eileen Atkins plays Virginia Woolf in "A Room of One's Own."This is essentially an edited recitation of a lecture Woolf gave in 1928 at one of Cambridge's quasi-official women's colleges, though, as Alistair Cooke notes in his informative introduction, Atkins is not doing an impersonation of Woolf.While Atkins may resemble Woolf with her elongated face and the proto-Annie Hall look favored by this brightest star of the literary constellation known as the Bloomsbury Group, Cooke points out that Atkins' trained dramatic voice is much, much better than Woolf's high-pitched tremble.
NEWS
By SUSAN REIMER | October 23, 2005
In You, the Coed, a handbook given to freshmen at Ohio University in the mid 1960s, young women were instructed on the finer points of being a lady and "an ideal coed." "We want you to consider your reputation," the handbook read. "OU isn't a very big place. Your life partner may be just around the corner. So make sure what is going on in your corner is fun and strictly collegiate." In the handbook, there are pages of advice on dress (women must wear a hat and gloves to church and to the Sunday noon meal)
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,SUN STAFF | April 14, 2004
Anne Carey Boucher, former chairwoman of the Maryland Commission on the Status of Women and member of Morgan State University's board of regents, died in her sleep of undetermined causes Friday at her Towson home. She was 66 and had lived for many years in Cockeysville. She and her husband, Greater Baltimore Committee Director William Boucher III, were recalled yesterday as an "inseparable civic team" who promoted the rebirth of downtown Baltimore. Mr. Boucher, who died in 1995, headed the civic group for 26 years.
NEWS
October 24, 2005
IN WASHINGTON, where political and social climbers are ubiquitous, FOB was once a witty reference to the elite community of Friends of Bill - as in Bill Clinton. People measured their importance by their closeness to the president. FOB is a different shorthand within the Bush administration. Friends of Bush don't just occasionally revel in the president's limelight at White House dinners or high-priced political fundraisers, they get to help run the country, hold key Cabinet jobs, lead vital federal agencies, and possibly sit on the Supreme Court - even if their qualifications are thin.
NEWS
November 22, 1992
Name: Kimberly A. Stafford of LinthicumActivities/hobbies: A new member of the Anne Arundel County Commission on the Status of Women, which advises the County Executive on issues such as promoting equal rights for women and eliminating discrimination in both the public and private sectors.Ms. Stafford works for the law firm of D'Alesandro, Miliman, and Yermin in Baltimore. Before working in the private sector, she was a member of the State's Attorney's Office in Anne Arundel County. She is a qualified paralegal and a former licensed private investigator for Unitech and Associates in Baltimore.
NEWS
By Alissa J. Rubin and Alissa J. Rubin,Los Angeles Times | January 21, 2007
Kabul, Afghanistan -- Each morning, the policewoman puts on her uniform, goes to her precinct office, sits behind a bare desk. And waits. She is one of several officers appointed to make it easier for women to report domestic violence. Her job ought to be one of the busiest in the district. Instead, Pushtoon, who goes by one name, has one of the loneliest. "Last week we had one woman. Before that there had not been anyone for several weeks," she said, twisting hands left scarred by her attempt at suicide years ago in a Taliban jail.
NEWS
By SUSAN REIMER | October 23, 2005
In You, the Coed, a handbook given to freshmen at Ohio University in the mid 1960s, young women were instructed on the finer points of being a lady and "an ideal coed." "We want you to consider your reputation," the handbook read. "OU isn't a very big place. Your life partner may be just around the corner. So make sure what is going on in your corner is fun and strictly collegiate." In the handbook, there are pages of advice on dress (women must wear a hat and gloves to church and to the Sunday noon meal)
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,SUN STAFF | April 14, 2004
Anne Carey Boucher, former chairwoman of the Maryland Commission on the Status of Women and member of Morgan State University's board of regents, died in her sleep of undetermined causes Friday at her Towson home. She was 66 and had lived for many years in Cockeysville. She and her husband, Greater Baltimore Committee Director William Boucher III, were recalled yesterday as an "inseparable civic team" who promoted the rebirth of downtown Baltimore. Mr. Boucher, who died in 1995, headed the civic group for 26 years.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | April 11, 1999
UNITED NATIONS -- A consensus reached at a 180-nation conference in Cairo, Egypt, five years ago on a new strategy for limiting world population growth by improving the status of women is facing serious religious, ideological and financial difficulties.The strategy would allow the world's population to rise from its present level of about 5.9 billion people to close to 9.8 billion by the year 2050, and then hold it at around that level.But a review conference convened here at the end of last month to see what progress countries were making toward the Cairo goals broke up with barely half its work completed.
NEWS
By Ann LoLordo and Ann LoLordo,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | July 6, 1998
RAMALLAH, West Bank -- Maha Abu Dayeh-Shamas set out with dozens of other women more than a year ago to improve the legal status of women in Palestinian society. They wanted to reform laws that permit men to have more than one wife and require a woman to get her father's permission to wed.But the group ran into stiff opposition from Palestinian women, devout Muslims who believed that the proposed reforms defiled Islam and would lead to the breakup of the family."We were raising issues that deal with power centers in this society," says Abu Dayeh-Shamas, director of the Women's Center for Legal Aid and Counseling.
NEWS
September 4, 1997
Lucy Somerville Howorth,102, a lawyer and longtime fighter for women's rights, died Aug. 23 in Cleveland, Miss. Mrs. Howorth was a pioneer in the women's movement, breaking ground in her Mississippi and becoming a major political player in Washington.In 1961, she was named adviser to the President's Commission on the Status of Women. She joined the forerunner of the American Association of University Women in 1918. She was among the first female appointees by President Franklin D. Roosevelt to the Board of Veterans Appeals.
NEWS
By Sara Engram | August 3, 1997
TWENTY-FIVE YEARS after Ms. magazine made its debut, the women's movement in the United States may seem less cutting-edge than other causes. But in significant ways, the culture into which American girls are born now has been transformed.That's not true world-wide, of course, but at least the idea that girls and women deserve equal rights and opportunities is being heard everywhere and is even being incorporated into establishment doctrine.Institutions like the World Bank are beginning to recognize that one of the most efficient ways to raise the standard of living in poor countries is to funnel aid to girls and women.
NEWS
By Ann LoLordo and Ann LoLordo,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | July 6, 1998
RAMALLAH, West Bank -- Maha Abu Dayeh-Shamas set out with dozens of other women more than a year ago to improve the legal status of women in Palestinian society. They wanted to reform laws that permit men to have more than one wife and require a woman to get her father's permission to wed.But the group ran into stiff opposition from Palestinian women, devout Muslims who believed that the proposed reforms defiled Islam and would lead to the breakup of the family."We were raising issues that deal with power centers in this society," says Abu Dayeh-Shamas, director of the Women's Center for Legal Aid and Counseling.
NEWS
By ELLEN GOODMAN | August 24, 1993
,TC Boston. -- Each year, in tribute to our historic foremothers, I celebrate August 26, the anniversary of the passage of women's suffrage, by announcing the Equal Rites Awards. This is a much coveted and highly competitive set of prizes that go to those people who did their utmost over the past 12 months to set back the progress of women.Once again our overworked one-woman jury had to wade through all sorts of mixed messages about the status of women. After all, within the past 12 months the number of women in the Senate more than trebled.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | May 12, 1996
In Iran, Azar Nafisi, a professor of English, writes about the strong and clever women in Persian classical literature and the pallid female characters in contemporary Iranian fiction.In Bangladesh, Yasmeen Murshed, chairwoman of an Asia-Pacific network for women in politics, teaches women how to run for office and write legislation enhancing their rights.In Malaysia, Norani Othman, an anthropologist, leads a movement to reinterpret Islamic law and strip it of centuries of accretions that discriminate against women.
NEWS
By ELLEN GOODMAN | August 24, 1993
,TC Boston. -- Each year, in tribute to our historic foremothers, I celebrate August 26, the anniversary of the passage of women's suffrage, by announcing the Equal Rites Awards. This is a much coveted and highly competitive set of prizes that go to those people who did their utmost over the past 12 months to set back the progress of women.Once again our overworked one-woman jury had to wade through all sorts of mixed messages about the status of women. After all, within the past 12 months the number of women in the Senate more than trebled.
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