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By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | January 21, 2012
Elger Joseph Huber Sr., a retired stationary engineer who helped produce the distinctive blue Noxzema and Bromo-Seltzer glass containers and was later a school bus driver, died of respiratory failure Monday at Howard County General Hospital. The North Laurel resident was 87. Born in Baltimore, he grew up on the grounds of Lake Roland, where his father worked for the city's Division of Water Supply. The family of 13 lived in a house in what is now Robert E. Lee Park. He attended city public schools.
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By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | June 25, 2014
Thomas D. McKewen, a materials recovery and waste management expert who was the founding director of Maryland Environmental Service, died June 13 of congestive heart failure at his home in Ashburn, Va. The former Towson resident was 86. "I had been hearing that he was a person with a lot of ability and had an understanding of the environmental work we were doing," said former Gov. Marvin J. Mandel, who appointed Mr. McKewen as director of the...
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NEWS
April 4, 2006
Vernon Milton Kershaw, a retired noncommissioned Navy officer who later was a stationary engineer, died of lung cancer Wednesday at Harbor Hospital. The Glen Burnie resident was 85. Mr. Kershaw was born in Baltimore and raised in Hampden. He was a graduate of Polytechnic Institute and enlisted in the Navy in 1942. He served aboard destroyers as a master chief machinist's mate for 22 years until retiring from the Navy in 1964. From the late 1960s into the early 1970s, he edited technical manuals for Edward T. Johnson Co. in Washington.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | June 8, 2012
Karl Max Jenkins, a former German merchant mariner who jumped ship in Baltimore and later became a stationary engineer and building superintendent, died Saturday of heart failure at Oak Crest Village retirement community. The former longtime Lauraville resident was 104. "He was an old salt and a walking history book," said Frank G. Lidinsky, a Baltimore attorney who was Mr. Jenkins' personal representative and friend for more than two decades. "He was a smart and engaging guy. " He was born Karl Max Jeglinski (a name which was later changed to Jenkins when he served in the U.S. Army)
NEWS
June 12, 2002
James M. Powell, a retired city schools stationary engineer, died Friday at Maryland Shock Trauma Center after being struck by a car while crossing a West Baltimore intersection. He was 80 and had lived in the Edmondson Village neighborhood for 20 years. Mr. Powell operated school boilers for the city Department of Education, and after retiring in 1990, he worked for Maryland Cup Co. and the old Liberty Medical Center. Born and raised in Baltimore, Mr. Powell earned a stationary engineer's license after graduating from Carver Vocational-Technical High School.
NEWS
June 12, 2003
Jackson Levering Dietz Jr., a retired stationary engineer and World War II veteran, died of lung cancer Monday at his Perry Hall home. He was 84. Mr. Dietz was born in Reckord, Baltimore County, and raised near Fallston. He attended Bel Air High School until the 10th grade, when he left to take a job as a dump truck driver during construction of U.S. 40. In the late 1930s, he was employed as a bottle washer at the Frank L. Wight Distillery in Loreley. He was inducted into the Army in 1941 and served with the 71st Anti-Aircraft Artillery Gun Battalion as a driver and mechanic.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun and Baltimore Sun reporter | December 10, 2010
Charles H. Klaus Sr., a retired stationary engineer and lifelong Woodlawn resident, died Tuesday of a staph infection at his home. He was 96. Mr. Klaus was born in Baltimore and spent the remainder of his life in Woodlawn. "He lived in a house on Dogwood Road that was later torn down in the 1960s to make way for Martin's West," said his daughter, Cassie A. Klaus-Maye of Williamsburg, Va. Mr. Klaus attended Woodlawn Elementary School until the fifth grade, when he left to help support his family.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,sun Reporter | November 19, 2007
James Richard Boone, a retired merchant mariner and stationary engineer, died of lung cancer Saturday at Gilchrist Center for Hospice Care. The Parkville resident was 78. Mr. Boone was born in Baltimore and raised on his family's farm in Fork. He attended Baltimore County public schools until he was 16, when he quit to join the U.S. merchant marine in 1945. During his early days, he sailed on both Liberty and Victory ships, and concluded his first voyage to France in 1946. During the Korean War, he served on vessels supplying ammunition and other war materiel to American forces.
NEWS
July 14, 2000
Charles Matthew Hynson 86, stationary engineer Charles Matthew Hynson, a retired stationary engineer, died July 7 of heart failure at his Woodlawn home. He was 86 and had lived on Ivanhoe Avenue in Govans since 1956. Before his retirement in the 1960s, he was a plant engineer at Lamm Bros., a local manufacturer. He was born in Baltimore and graduated from Frederick Douglass High School. He received a certificate in stationary engineering from the International School of Reading, Pa. During World War II, he was a member of the Army quartermaster corps and served in the Pacific.
NEWS
October 13, 1995
Oscar R. Ingram, 72, stationary engineerOscar R. Ingram, a retired stationary engineer who was active in church work, died Wednesday of cancer at the Liberty Medical Center. He was 72 and lived in Northwest Baltimore.Mr. Ingram retired seven years ago after 38 years with the Baltimore City school system.The native of North Carolina, who came to Baltimore in 1942, was a class leader, a member of the steward board and a tenor in the Gospel Chorus at the Pennsylvania Avenue African Methodist Episcopal Zion Church, Pennsylvania Avenue and Dolphin Street, where services will be held at 10:30 a.m. tomorrow.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | January 21, 2012
Elger Joseph Huber Sr., a retired stationary engineer who helped produce the distinctive blue Noxzema and Bromo-Seltzer glass containers and was later a school bus driver, died of respiratory failure Monday at Howard County General Hospital. The North Laurel resident was 87. Born in Baltimore, he grew up on the grounds of Lake Roland, where his father worked for the city's Division of Water Supply. The family of 13 lived in a house in what is now Robert E. Lee Park. He attended city public schools.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | November 18, 2011
Dennis Francis Hasson, a retired Naval Academy professor, died Tuesday of emphysema and congestive heart failure at his Severna Park home. He was 77. The son of a stationary engineer and a homemaker, Dr. Hasson was raised in Hamilton. After graduating in 1952 from Polytechnic Institute, he earned a bachelor's degree in 1955 in mechanical engineering from the Johns Hopkins University. He earned a master's degree in 1958 in aerospace engineering from Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun and Baltimore Sun reporter | December 10, 2010
Charles H. Klaus Sr., a retired stationary engineer and lifelong Woodlawn resident, died Tuesday of a staph infection at his home. He was 96. Mr. Klaus was born in Baltimore and spent the remainder of his life in Woodlawn. "He lived in a house on Dogwood Road that was later torn down in the 1960s to make way for Martin's West," said his daughter, Cassie A. Klaus-Maye of Williamsburg, Va. Mr. Klaus attended Woodlawn Elementary School until the fifth grade, when he left to help support his family.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen | December 20, 2008
The Rev. Paul James Lewis, a retired stationary engineer and founder of two churches, died of colon cancer Dec. 10 at a daughter-in-law's Northeast Baltimore home. He was 80. Born and raised in Orlando, Fla., Mr. Lewis, the son of sharecroppers, was educated in Orlando and Kissimmee, Fla., public schools. In the late 1940s, he moved to Philadelphia with his family. Mr. Lewis enlisted in the Army and served as an infantryman with the 45th Division in Korea. His decorations, family members said, included three Bronze Stars and the Korean Service Ribbon.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly | May 23, 2008
Ronald Edward Hollie, the retired president of a hospital workers union and a stationary engineer, died of cancer Sunday at Sinai Hospital. The Cheswolde resident was 71. Born in Baltimore and raised on Pine Street, he attended St. Pius V Parochial School and attended Carver Vocational Technical High School. He later earned a General Education degree and took courses at Dundalk Community College. He served in the Marine Corps from 1957 to 1960. He then worked as a licensed stationary engineer at Johns Hopkins Hospital, where his beginning salary was $35 a week, his family said.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,sun Reporter | November 19, 2007
James Richard Boone, a retired merchant mariner and stationary engineer, died of lung cancer Saturday at Gilchrist Center for Hospice Care. The Parkville resident was 78. Mr. Boone was born in Baltimore and raised on his family's farm in Fork. He attended Baltimore County public schools until he was 16, when he quit to join the U.S. merchant marine in 1945. During his early days, he sailed on both Liberty and Victory ships, and concluded his first voyage to France in 1946. During the Korean War, he served on vessels supplying ammunition and other war materiel to American forces.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly | May 23, 2008
Ronald Edward Hollie, the retired president of a hospital workers union and a stationary engineer, died of cancer Sunday at Sinai Hospital. The Cheswolde resident was 71. Born in Baltimore and raised on Pine Street, he attended St. Pius V Parochial School and attended Carver Vocational Technical High School. He later earned a General Education degree and took courses at Dundalk Community College. He served in the Marine Corps from 1957 to 1960. He then worked as a licensed stationary engineer at Johns Hopkins Hospital, where his beginning salary was $35 a week, his family said.
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