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By Nancy Menefee Jackson and Nancy Menefee Jackson,Special to the Sun | July 2, 2000
Coming off a rotator cuff injury is tough when you're an avid tennis player. But when you're also 84 years old, it can be especially difficult. But Maggie Weinberg learned a long time ago to shrug off setbacks. In her youth in the 1920s, Weinberg played against some of the best local tennis players in the area. "I usually lost," she says, but she is proud that she was able to compete. As an adult singles player in the 1950s, she played in The Evening Sun-sponsored tournaments, as well as those at tennis clubs such as Homeland and Suburban.
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FEATURES
By Karen Nitkin, For The Baltimore Sun | September 23, 2012
A group of 11 Baltimore women who set out Sept. 19 to ride their bicycles 365 miles across Maryland in five days arrived Sunday at Fort McHenry to the cheers of more than 100 family members and friends.. The participants are members of a group called Women Who STAND/Baltimore, formed about two years ago as part of the Baltimore-based global organization World Relief. The bicyclists raised nearly $40,000 through the event, called Ride 365, for organizations benefiting women and girls in Malawi and Cambodia.
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NEWS
By Nancy Menefee Jackson and Nancy Menefee Jackson,Special to the Sun | April 16, 2000
A pile of leaves forever changed 50-year-old Rob Pernick's sense of vulnerability. But despite a crippling accident caused by those leaves, Pernick's commitment to exercise never wavered. On Nov. 14, 1998, the avid cyclist and runner dropped his wife, Diane, and daughter Sarah at school for Sarah's clarinet competition. He drove home, and then rode his bike to the network of paths near his Columbia house. It was a cool, dry day, and Pernick was not alarmed when his tire crossed a pile of dry leaves on the trail.
NEWS
By BLYTHE BERNHARD and BLYTHE BERNHARD,ORANGE COUNTY REGISTER | November 4, 2005
Augie Nieto first noticed his life had changed when he struggled to lift the same weights he had lifted every day for 30 years. Must be getting older, Nieto, 47, thought. The story, now legend, of Augustine L. Nieto II starts with an overweight child growing up in Anaheim, Calif. Nieto's passion for weight loss and exercise led to a class project as an undergraduate at Claremont McKenna College - starting a strength-training gym. "I was just that kid who found exercise as his fantasy, his religion, his way of being," Nieto said.
FEATURES
By Laura Lippman and Laura Lippman,SUN STAFF | November 6, 1995
It's an autumn weekend in the Berkshires. A group of 11 cyclists is working its way across the hilly countryside, trying to remember to take in the vivid colors even as legs burn and sweat starts to drip.Just one more hill, urges the leader, Mark Hoffman. The cyclists crest the hill and start cycling faster and faster, collapsing happily at the finish line.Then they open their eyes and see the pale green walls of the Meadow Mill Athletic Club and the racquetball courts on either side. And although the cyclists feel as if they have traveled miles in the past 45 minutes, the specially designed stationary bicycles beneath them haven't budged an inch.
NEWS
By Gailor Large and Gailor Large,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | August 22, 2004
I am 46 and never learned to ride a bike as a child. I tried in my early 20s and was able to ride a little bit, but somewhere along the way, I lost my nerve and put the bike away. Now I want to try it again. Are there any particular ways I can get my body ready for this? Leg exercises? Balancing on one foot? I donM-Ft own an exercise bike, but would that help? And is there a best kind of bike for an adult beginner? We posed your question to Kris Auer, a manager at Mount Washington Bike Shop, who says, M-tJump in with both feet.
NEWS
By Nancy Menefee Jackson and Nancy Menefee Jackson,Special to the Sun | February 6, 2000
Lisa Aukland hesitates when someone calls her a bodybuilder. She is well aware of the sport's negative image. The fact that she recently completed her doctoral degree in pharmacy makes her even more conscious of the steroids and other drugs some bodybuilders take to bulk up. Aukland makes it a point to compete only in events that rigorously screen for drug use. "I want a level playing field," she says, noting that the "drug-free" competitions she enters...
FEATURES
By Karen Nitkin, For The Baltimore Sun | September 23, 2012
A group of 11 Baltimore women who set out Sept. 19 to ride their bicycles 365 miles across Maryland in five days arrived Sunday at Fort McHenry to the cheers of more than 100 family members and friends.. The participants are members of a group called Women Who STAND/Baltimore, formed about two years ago as part of the Baltimore-based global organization World Relief. The bicyclists raised nearly $40,000 through the event, called Ride 365, for organizations benefiting women and girls in Malawi and Cambodia.
NEWS
By BLYTHE BERNHARD and BLYTHE BERNHARD,ORANGE COUNTY REGISTER | November 4, 2005
Augie Nieto first noticed his life had changed when he struggled to lift the same weights he had lifted every day for 30 years. Must be getting older, Nieto, 47, thought. The story, now legend, of Augustine L. Nieto II starts with an overweight child growing up in Anaheim, Calif. Nieto's passion for weight loss and exercise led to a class project as an undergraduate at Claremont McKenna College - starting a strength-training gym. "I was just that kid who found exercise as his fantasy, his religion, his way of being," Nieto said.
FEATURES
By Gabe Mirkin, M.D. and Gabe Mirkin, M.D.,Special to The Sun United Features Syndicate | March 8, 1994
Q: I hate riding a stationary bicycle because it's so uncomfortable. Can you get a good workout on a recumbent model?A: When you ride a conventional stationary bicycle, you have to sit on a narrow seat to allow your legs to reach the pedals. The seat often presses your pudendal nerve against your pelvic bones, which can cause numbness and pain. With a recumbent bicycle, the chair is contoured to fit your back, and you can exert plenty of force with your legs extended at hip level. The wind-resistant recumbent bike pedals far more smoothly than other kinds.
NEWS
By Gailor Large and Gailor Large,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | August 22, 2004
I am 46 and never learned to ride a bike as a child. I tried in my early 20s and was able to ride a little bit, but somewhere along the way, I lost my nerve and put the bike away. Now I want to try it again. Are there any particular ways I can get my body ready for this? Leg exercises? Balancing on one foot? I donM-Ft own an exercise bike, but would that help? And is there a best kind of bike for an adult beginner? We posed your question to Kris Auer, a manager at Mount Washington Bike Shop, who says, M-tJump in with both feet.
NEWS
By Nancy Menefee Jackson and Nancy Menefee Jackson,Special to the Sun | July 2, 2000
Coming off a rotator cuff injury is tough when you're an avid tennis player. But when you're also 84 years old, it can be especially difficult. But Maggie Weinberg learned a long time ago to shrug off setbacks. In her youth in the 1920s, Weinberg played against some of the best local tennis players in the area. "I usually lost," she says, but she is proud that she was able to compete. As an adult singles player in the 1950s, she played in The Evening Sun-sponsored tournaments, as well as those at tennis clubs such as Homeland and Suburban.
NEWS
By Nancy Menefee Jackson and Nancy Menefee Jackson,Special to the Sun | April 16, 2000
A pile of leaves forever changed 50-year-old Rob Pernick's sense of vulnerability. But despite a crippling accident caused by those leaves, Pernick's commitment to exercise never wavered. On Nov. 14, 1998, the avid cyclist and runner dropped his wife, Diane, and daughter Sarah at school for Sarah's clarinet competition. He drove home, and then rode his bike to the network of paths near his Columbia house. It was a cool, dry day, and Pernick was not alarmed when his tire crossed a pile of dry leaves on the trail.
NEWS
By Nancy Menefee Jackson and Nancy Menefee Jackson,Special to the Sun | February 6, 2000
Lisa Aukland hesitates when someone calls her a bodybuilder. She is well aware of the sport's negative image. The fact that she recently completed her doctoral degree in pharmacy makes her even more conscious of the steroids and other drugs some bodybuilders take to bulk up. Aukland makes it a point to compete only in events that rigorously screen for drug use. "I want a level playing field," she says, noting that the "drug-free" competitions she enters...
FEATURES
By Laura Lippman and Laura Lippman,SUN STAFF | November 6, 1995
It's an autumn weekend in the Berkshires. A group of 11 cyclists is working its way across the hilly countryside, trying to remember to take in the vivid colors even as legs burn and sweat starts to drip.Just one more hill, urges the leader, Mark Hoffman. The cyclists crest the hill and start cycling faster and faster, collapsing happily at the finish line.Then they open their eyes and see the pale green walls of the Meadow Mill Athletic Club and the racquetball courts on either side. And although the cyclists feel as if they have traveled miles in the past 45 minutes, the specially designed stationary bicycles beneath them haven't budged an inch.
FEATURES
By Gabe Mirkin, M.D. and Gabe Mirkin, M.D.,Special to The Sun United Features Syndicate | March 8, 1994
Q: I hate riding a stationary bicycle because it's so uncomfortable. Can you get a good workout on a recumbent model?A: When you ride a conventional stationary bicycle, you have to sit on a narrow seat to allow your legs to reach the pedals. The seat often presses your pudendal nerve against your pelvic bones, which can cause numbness and pain. With a recumbent bicycle, the chair is contoured to fit your back, and you can exert plenty of force with your legs extended at hip level. The wind-resistant recumbent bike pedals far more smoothly than other kinds.
FEATURES
November 22, 1998
The U.S. surgeon general recommends sedentary people try to burn at least 150 calories a day to stay healthy. The amount of exercise it would take for a 150-pound person to meet that requirement would include:Walk on a treadmill: 4 mph, 32 minutesJog slowly on a treadmill: 5 mph, 18 minutesRide a stationary bike with moderate resistance: 10 mph, 22 minutesWork on a stair-climbing machine: moderate pace, 21 minutesWash and wax your car: 45-60 minutesRake leaves:...
SPORTS
By ROCH KUBATKO | August 22, 2006
After watching the first half of the Cowboys-Saints game last night, this much is certain: Give Drew Bledsoe 20 minutes to throw, and he's going to pick you apart. Terrell Owens didn't make the trip, which means another segment devoted entirely to him on ESPN's SportsCenter. I can't wait until he actually plays and justifies getting all this attention. Right now, I don't need updates on what color shorts he wore while riding the stationary bike. I hear the Red Sox are pretty angry right now, knowing that the Yankees never would have swept them in a six-game series.
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