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By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | November 15, 1995
HOUSTON -- The shuttle Atlantis, after a three-day orbital chase of the space station Mir, caught and docked with the Russian spacecraft Mir today in a link-up that serves as a prelude to building large structures in orbit.Atlantis and its crew of five, moving in a lower orbit but at a slightly higher speed than Mir since beginning the journey Sunday, reached the Russian station late last night. Then, in a slow ballet above the Earth, astronauts maneuvered a new docking module to join the two craft on schedule, at about 1:27 a.m., for a planned three-day visit.
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By Frank D. Roylance | March 18, 2001
Sometime this week, the wispy atmosphere 68 miles above the Earth will begin to bend back the fragile solar panels on the Russian space station Mir - gently at first, like a dog's ears in the wind. But then it will rip them off, and break the obsolete, 148-ton Mir station into a formation of 1,500 white-hot, aluminum and titanium meteors. Whatever doesn't burn up or melt will be hell-bent for a deep-ocean grave in the remote southeastern Pacific. That's if the Russians' plans to ditch Mir go as advertised.
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NEWS
September 7, 1997
THERE HAS BEEN some grumbling among Russians that too much emphasis is placed on the continuing problems of space station Mir. After all, the 11-year-old spacecraft is performing far beyond its expected length of service. And the end is near. An international space station is being built to replace Mir. Plans call for any Mir parts that survive re-entry into Earth's atmosphere to crash into the Pacific Ocean in early 1999.Even considering Mir's unexpected longevity, the space station has had a litany of problems, some due to age, others to neglect.
FEATURES
By Dave Barry and Dave Barry,Knight-Ridder News Service | December 28, 1997
WHAT KIND OF YEAR was 1997?It was -- in the immortal words of Al Gore, who began 1997 as a serious presidential timber and ended it fleeing through swamps pursued by federal dogs -- a year with no controlling legal authority.It was a year when Mike Tyson could chomp off a piece of his opponent's ear during an internationally broadcast title fight and still not be the year's most famous biter.But most important of all, it was a year that, thank goodness, had only 12 months, because that was frankly all we could take.
NEWS
October 21, 1991
Ever get the feeling you're just going round in circles while the world spins away from you? Now hear the sad plight of Sergei Krikalyov.Cosmonaut Krikalyov is the flight engineer aboard the Soviet space station Mir. He has spent the last five months in orbit, and when his relief flight pulled in from Earth the other day, it brought no relief for Mr. Krikalyov.The Soviet space program, like much else in the Soviet Union, has fallen on lean times. The twice-yearly shuttle to Mir, the space station assembled in orbit in 1986, usually carries a two-man Soviet crew and a propaganda guest in the third seat.
FEATURES
By Dave Barry and Dave Barry,Knight-Ridder News Service | December 28, 1997
WHAT KIND OF YEAR was 1997?It was -- in the immortal words of Al Gore, who began 1997 as a serious presidential timber and ended it fleeing through swamps pursued by federal dogs -- a year with no controlling legal authority.It was a year when Mike Tyson could chomp off a piece of his opponent's ear during an internationally broadcast title fight and still not be the year's most famous biter.But most important of all, it was a year that, thank goodness, had only 12 months, because that was frankly all we could take.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,Sun Staff Writer | February 5, 1994
The space shuttle Discovery will be briefly visible early today to observers in the Baltimore region, thanks to an orbit that takes it as far north as Hudson's Bay in Canada.If you got up too late today, you will have several more opportunities to spot Discovery during its current mission, NASA spokesman Kyle Herring said. The Russian space station Mir also will be visible next week, weather permitting.Discovery is flying in an orbit with a 57-degree inclination, which means it goes as far as 57 degrees north latitude and as far as 57 degrees south latitude.
NEWS
September 27, 1997
SPACE AGENCY Director Daniel S. Goldin made the right decision in letting another U.S. astronaut spend a few months aboard Russian space station Mir. But he will be severely second-guessed if something goes wrong. And it could.Mr. Goldin is not taking this situation lightly. The NASA executive has done as much as he can to assure that the Russians make Mir as safe as possible. But the unexpected is always part of space flight.And Mir has had more than its share of unexpected maladies, a breakdown of varying degrees every two days by some calculations.
NEWS
July 3, 1995
The movement of Russia into the community of nations, nudged by the United States, proceeds apace with little notice. While the Yeltsin government was convulsed with parliamentary rebuke and resignations from the war in Chechnya -- and while the U.S. shuttle Atlantis was docking at the Russian space station Mir -- Vice President Al Gore and Prime Minister Viktor Chernomyrdin were leading platoons of bureaucrats signing papers in Moscow.In the long run, those pieces of paper will be remembered from the events of the week, if only as part of a larger flow.
NEWS
By Jim Lovell | October 17, 1997
THE RECENT near-collision between the Russian space station Mir and an inoperative U.S. research satellite -- the closest Mir has come to an unrelated spacecraft in its 11-year history -- reminds us of the importance of taking responsibility for spent spacecraft and finding ways to reduce the number of man-made objects circling Earth.This month marks the 40th anniversary of the Soviet Union's launch of the world's first satellite, Sputnik 1.Since then, approximately 4,800 satellites and space probes have been launched on missions to explore the universe and develop technology for use on Earth.
NEWS
By Jim Lovell | October 17, 1997
THE RECENT near-collision between the Russian space station Mir and an inoperative U.S. research satellite -- the closest Mir has come to an unrelated spacecraft in its 11-year history -- reminds us of the importance of taking responsibility for spent spacecraft and finding ways to reduce the number of man-made objects circling Earth.This month marks the 40th anniversary of the Soviet Union's launch of the world's first satellite, Sputnik 1.Since then, approximately 4,800 satellites and space probes have been launched on missions to explore the universe and develop technology for use on Earth.
NEWS
September 27, 1997
SPACE AGENCY Director Daniel S. Goldin made the right decision in letting another U.S. astronaut spend a few months aboard Russian space station Mir. But he will be severely second-guessed if something goes wrong. And it could.Mr. Goldin is not taking this situation lightly. The NASA executive has done as much as he can to assure that the Russians make Mir as safe as possible. But the unexpected is always part of space flight.And Mir has had more than its share of unexpected maladies, a breakdown of varying degrees every two days by some calculations.
NEWS
September 7, 1997
THERE HAS BEEN some grumbling among Russians that too much emphasis is placed on the continuing problems of space station Mir. After all, the 11-year-old spacecraft is performing far beyond its expected length of service. And the end is near. An international space station is being built to replace Mir. Plans call for any Mir parts that survive re-entry into Earth's atmosphere to crash into the Pacific Ocean in early 1999.Even considering Mir's unexpected longevity, the space station has had a litany of problems, some due to age, others to neglect.
NEWS
By Douglas M. Birch and Douglas M. Birch,SUN STAFF | August 24, 1997
It's been called the biggest engineering project in history, but you can't tell by squinting at the blueprints.The prefab structure will be assembled on a remote site by a few dozen laborers. There will only be enough room inside for seven people to live and work. No tourists in T-shirts and shorts will ever tromp around outside. When it's finally finished, it will resemble some bus-sized beer cans stuck together like Tinker Toys and fitted with metal dragonfly wings.Still, the completed International Space Station should be an awe-inspiring sight -- in part, because it will have survived so many technical and political crises.
NEWS
By Gwynne Dyer | July 25, 1997
LONDON -- The last time I saw the prototype of the Russian space shuttle Buran it was sitting in Gorky Park in Moscow, covered in snow, awaiting conversion into an up-market restaurant.That says a lot about the financial plight of the Russian space program. Buran, like many other projects, was scrapped because the money ran out. But it doesn't tell you anything about the competence, dedication and ingenuity of the Russians who still work in the space program.The Russian space station Mir has been in orbit 11 years.
NEWS
By Yuri Karash | July 15, 1997
ARLINGTON, Va. -- When the Progress cargo ship hit the Russian space station Mir last month, the U.S. astronaut Mike Foale heard ''a big thump, a thud.'' The noise reverberated as an explosion in U.S. political and analytical circles, after a series of recent mishaps to Mir operations, including an on-board fire, failure of an oxygen generator and leaks in the cooling system.Rep. F. James Sensenbrenner, R-Wis., chairman of the House Science, Space and Technology Committee, who is known for his criticism of the growing Russian involvement in U.S. space activities, asked the NASA administrator, Daniel Goldin, to give his personal assurances, based on independent evaluations, that Mir meets or exceeds U.S. space-safety standards before the next U.S. astronaut is put aboard the station.
NEWS
By Gwynne Dyer | July 25, 1997
LONDON -- The last time I saw the prototype of the Russian space shuttle Buran it was sitting in Gorky Park in Moscow, covered in snow, awaiting conversion into an up-market restaurant.That says a lot about the financial plight of the Russian space program. Buran, like many other projects, was scrapped because the money ran out. But it doesn't tell you anything about the competence, dedication and ingenuity of the Russians who still work in the space program.The Russian space station Mir has been in orbit 11 years.
NEWS
By Knight-Ridder News Service | April 21, 1995
CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- It's a good thing that NASA astronaut Norman Thagard packed an extra change of clothes when he went into space with the Russian cosmonauts in March.He won't be home as soon as expected.Dr. Thagard, 51, a physician and veteran of five previous flights, made history March 14 when he became the first U.S. astronaut to be launched aboard a Russian rocket and the first to join cosmonauts aboard the space station Mir.He was supposed to be picked up by the NASA shuttle Atlantis in early June in the first docking between a U.S. shuttle and Mir.That docking was postponed yesterday for the second time, said NASA spokeswoman Lisa Malone.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,SUN STAFF | June 26, 1997
First, there was a hissing and an unmistakable pressure change in astronaut Michael Foale's inner ear. The air inside the Russian space station Mir was leaking into space.For Foale and his two Russian crew mates, there could be no more critical test of their training, and their ability to stay calm and focused on saving their ship. And themselves."It is as critical as it can get," astronaut Jerry Linenger said yesterday in Houston. "Decompression and fire are not good in space." Linenger helped beat down a fire this year that filled Mir with smoke and nearly sent the crew scrambling for a Soyuz escape capsule.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | November 15, 1995
HOUSTON -- The shuttle Atlantis, after a three-day orbital chase of the space station Mir, caught and docked with the Russian spacecraft Mir today in a link-up that serves as a prelude to building large structures in orbit.Atlantis and its crew of five, moving in a lower orbit but at a slightly higher speed than Mir since beginning the journey Sunday, reached the Russian station late last night. Then, in a slow ballet above the Earth, astronauts maneuvered a new docking module to join the two craft on schedule, at about 1:27 a.m., for a planned three-day visit.
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