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By Delthia Ricks and Delthia Ricks,NEWSDAY | May 26, 2005
Statins, the popular medications used to control cholesterol and stave off heart attacks, appear to reduce the risk of colorectal cancer, researchers are to report today. The finding by researchers at the University of Michigan is part of a growing number of studies that are pinpointing new roles for the most widely prescribed class of drugs in the United States. Globally, statins, which include Zocor, Lipitor, Crestor and Pravachol, account for an estimated $20 billion in annual sales.
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NEWS
By joe and teresa graedon | August 31, 2009
Question: : My husband started on lovastatin for high cholesterol and soon began to notice weakness in his right arm. This weakness progressed, so he saw his doctor, thinking he had a pinched nerve. He was referred to a neurologist, who gave him a diagnosis of "possible ALS." On his 60th birthday, a second opinion confirmed the diagnosis of ALS. Since that time, my husband has progressed from weakness in his right arm to complete loss of function in his arms, very weak leg muscles and difficulty breathing.
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NEWS
By WILLIAM HATHAWAY and WILLIAM HATHAWAY,HARTFORD COURANT | January 4, 2006
HARTFORD, CONN. -- Statins are good for the heart, but the popular cholesterol-lowering drugs - including Lipitor, Zocor and Pravachol - do not appear to prevent cancer, pharmacists at the University of Connecticut report in today's Journal of the American Medical Association. The researchers at the UConn School of Pharmacy reviewed 26 heart disease studies involving more than 73,000 subjects to determine whether statins helped prevent cancer. They found that no type of cancer was affected by statin use and that no type of statin reduced cancer risk, said C. Michael White, associate professor of pharmacy at UConn.
NEWS
By Joe and Teresa Graedon | July 27, 2009
Question: : A while ago, I read about persimmon tea for acid reflux. I have it from time to time, but my husband has it constantly. It is so bad that he wakes up almost every night and throws up! Prilosec, Nexium and a host of other drugs along with extra-strength Gaviscon or Pepcid do nothing. I made the persimmon tea. He drank a shot glass full the first morning and a shot glass after supper. From Day 1, he has slept soundly, and so have I. Nothing he eats now causes him heartburn. The recipe was simple, though we did have trouble finding persimmons at first.
NEWS
By BRUCE JAPSEN and BRUCE JAPSEN,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | May 21, 2006
CHICAGO -- Hailed for effectiveness at lowering cholesterol, the family of drugs known as statins in recent years has been the most costly U.S. brand-name prescription group for U.S. consumers and employers. Retailing between $2 and $5 a pill, statins accounted for $16 billion in U.S. sales last year, the leading class of brand-name drugs, representing 6.4 percent of U.S. prescription sales, according to research firm IMS Health. Now cholesterol pills are going on sale. The second-most widely prescribed statin, Zocor, is expected to be available late next month as a generic.
NEWS
By Ronald Kotulak and Ronald Kotulak,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | May 20, 2005
Researchers across the country are looking at whether cholesterol-lowering drugs taken by more than 25 million Americans might have an unexpected benefit: protection against a wide variety of cancers. Although the results from a growing number of preliminary studies on statins are lifting hopes for a broad-spectrum drug to prevent cancer, researchers warn against over-optimism, saying more research is needed. It's much too early for people to ask doctors for statins as a safeguard against cancer, they warn.
NEWS
By RONALD KOTULAK | December 25, 2005
CHICAGO -- Not since aspirin has a class of drugs come along that does so much more than originally intended that it could end up being used as a preventive against many major diseases. Statins, which lower cholesterol, have been proved in clinical trials to reduce heart attacks and strokes by 30 percent to 50 percent. They are the most widely prescribed drugs in the United States; one in 10 adults takes them. But their full value in improving the nation's health rests with research attempting to establish the ability of statins to prevent cancer, Alzheimer's disease, diabetes, osteoporosis, high blood pressure, multiple sclerosis and macular degeneration.
NEWS
By Joe and Teresa Graedon | July 27, 2009
Question: : A while ago, I read about persimmon tea for acid reflux. I have it from time to time, but my husband has it constantly. It is so bad that he wakes up almost every night and throws up! Prilosec, Nexium and a host of other drugs along with extra-strength Gaviscon or Pepcid do nothing. I made the persimmon tea. He drank a shot glass full the first morning and a shot glass after supper. From Day 1, he has slept soundly, and so have I. Nothing he eats now causes him heartburn. The recipe was simple, though we did have trouble finding persimmons at first.
NEWS
July 25, 1999
Q. Does grapefruit interfere with Pravachol the way it does with other statin-type cholesterol-lowering drugs?A. No. Pravachol is not metabolized by the same enzyme that is important for Lipitor, Mevacor or Zocor. Consequently, grapefruit does not raise blood levels of Pravachol as it does for other statins.Write to the Graedons in care of The Sun, 501 N. Calvert St., Baltimore, Md. 21278, or e-mail to pharmacy@mindspring.com.Pub Date: 07/25/99
NEWS
By Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon and Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon,Special to the Sun; King Features Syndicate | September 29, 2002
Q. I will be traveling to Kenya and will need to take anti-malaria medication. I've heard conflicting information regarding side effects of Lariam. Some authorities state that this medicine has a low level of side effects. But I have also heard testimonials from people who have had panic attacks after taking this drug. Do you have any information on this? Is there any alternative? A. Lariam (mefloquine) has made headlines because the Army is investigating the drug's possible connection to a series of domestic murders and suicides at Fort Bragg, N.C. The soldiers had taken Lariam to prevent malaria while on active duty.
NEWS
By JOE AND TERESA GRAEDON | April 20, 2009
My wife has been taking Lipitor for about three years. Two years ago, she began to have memory problems, and they have gotten steadily worse. She has been to a neurologist, and there does not seem to be an organic cause for her memory loss. I am left wondering if Lipitor could be to blame. How long should she stay off it to see if her memory improves? The issue of memory and statin cholesterol-lowering drugs is extremely controversial. During the past decade we have heard from hundreds of readers who believe drugs such as Lipitor, Crestor and Zocor (simvastatin)
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | November 10, 2008
NEW ORLEANS - In results from an eagerly anticipated study that could greatly change the treatment of cardiovascular disease, researchers have found that statin drugs - now given to millions of people with high cholesterol - can halve the risk of heart attack and stroke in seemingly healthy patients as well. The study of nearly 18,000 people with normal cholesterol found that the drugs lowered the risk of death from heart disease by 20 percent, suggesting that millions more people should be put on a daily regimen.
NEWS
July 14, 2008
Last week's recommendation by the American Academy of Pediatrics to give cholesterol-lowering drugs to some children as young as 8 is troubling. Millions of Americans take statins - the world's most-prescribed medications - to reduce the risk of heart disease by lowering their levels of "bad" cholesterol. These drugs have certainly prolonged the lives of thousands of middle-aged men with heart disease. But there is insufficient evidence that statins benefit other groups, notably younger children.
FEATURES
By Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon | November 22, 2007
I have received conflicting information from my doctor, a couple of pharmacists and patient-information inserts about how to avoid interactions between statins and grapefruit. I hope you can clarify this. I have been avoiding grapefruit (though not other citrus) completely, and would like to be able to eat it again if it is safe to do so. Certain cholesterol-lowering drugs such as atorvastatin (Lipitor), lovastatin (Mevacor) and simvastatin (Zocor) interact with compounds in grapefruit and its juice.
NEWS
By Dennis O'Brien and Jonathan Bor and Dennis O'Brien and Jonathan Bor,Sun Reporters | December 5, 2006
A decision by Pfizer Inc. to halt tests of an experimental cholesterol drug because of increased death rates was a setback likely to provoke closer scrutiny - but not an end to efforts to bring similar medications to market. Pfizer announced plans Saturday to end a large clinical trial of the drug torcetrapib after independent researchers monitoring the tests told company officials of the problem. Torcetrapib was designed to raise levels of HDL, commonly called "good cholesterol." It was supposed to complement statins now on the market that lower LDL or "bad" cholesterol.
NEWS
By BRUCE JAPSEN and BRUCE JAPSEN,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | May 21, 2006
CHICAGO -- Hailed for effectiveness at lowering cholesterol, the family of drugs known as statins in recent years has been the most costly U.S. brand-name prescription group for U.S. consumers and employers. Retailing between $2 and $5 a pill, statins accounted for $16 billion in U.S. sales last year, the leading class of brand-name drugs, representing 6.4 percent of U.S. prescription sales, according to research firm IMS Health. Now cholesterol pills are going on sale. The second-most widely prescribed statin, Zocor, is expected to be available late next month as a generic.
NEWS
By DAVID KOHN and DAVID KOHN,SUN REPORTER | March 17, 2006
A study published this week raises hopes that a common anti-cholesterol drug can reduce the artery deposits that play a crucial role in heart attacks and strokes. How that translates into treatment isn't clear, and it doesn't mean you should eat more doughnuts. But the research provides further evidence that statins -- powerful anti-cholesterol drugs used for two decades -- can significantly improve the physical changes associated with heart disease. Although doctors already prescribe statins to lower cholesterol and prevent the deposits -- known as plaques -- the study may encourage even more use, particularly at higher doses.
NEWS
July 14, 2008
Last week's recommendation by the American Academy of Pediatrics to give cholesterol-lowering drugs to some children as young as 8 is troubling. Millions of Americans take statins - the world's most-prescribed medications - to reduce the risk of heart disease by lowering their levels of "bad" cholesterol. These drugs have certainly prolonged the lives of thousands of middle-aged men with heart disease. But there is insufficient evidence that statins benefit other groups, notably younger children.
NEWS
By JOE GRAEDON AND TERESA GRAEDON | May 5, 2006
I have been using a nasal spray (such as Afrin) for at least six years. I cannot break this cycle of congestion. If I don't use the spray, I can't sleep and can't eat. My doctor prescribed a steroid nasal spray, but it wasn't enough. If you have any helpful suggestions for breaking my addiction, I would be grateful. Others who have gone through a similar predicament have come up with some suggestions that might be worth trying. Here's one: Buy two bottles of nasal spray. Use one full-strength in one nostril.
NEWS
By DAVID KOHN and DAVID KOHN,SUN REPORTER | March 17, 2006
A study published this week raises hopes that a common anti-cholesterol drug can reduce the artery deposits that play a crucial role in heart attacks and strokes. How that translates into treatment isn't clear, and it doesn't mean you should eat more doughnuts. But the research provides further evidence that statins -- powerful anti-cholesterol drugs used for two decades -- can significantly improve the physical changes associated with heart disease. Although doctors already prescribe statins to lower cholesterol and prevent the deposits -- known as plaques -- the study may encourage even more use, particularly at higher doses.
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