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NEWS
December 13, 2013
If there has been an administration in the history of this country with a more muddled, incompetent, directionless foreign policy than that of the current administration, I am not aware of it. President Barack Obama makes Jimmy Carter look like Winston Churchill. Syria, Afghanistan, Iran, Egypt, Libya, North Korea, Mali, you name it. Unmitigated disasters again and again and again. Thomas F. McDonough, Towson - To respond to this letter, send an email to talkback@baltimoresun.com . Please include your name and contact information.
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NEWS
December 13, 2013
If there has been an administration in the history of this country with a more muddled, incompetent, directionless foreign policy than that of the current administration, I am not aware of it. President Barack Obama makes Jimmy Carter look like Winston Churchill. Syria, Afghanistan, Iran, Egypt, Libya, North Korea, Mali, you name it. Unmitigated disasters again and again and again. Thomas F. McDonough, Towson - To respond to this letter, send an email to talkback@baltimoresun.com . Please include your name and contact information.
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EXPLORE
June 22, 2011
A recent meeting of the Board of County Commissioners — in which members discussed changing the sprinkler system requirements for residences — revealed a refreshing, enlightening and, frankly, astonishing statement from one of the commissioners. Haven Shoemaker was quoted as declaring the discussion "silly," and it concerned him that the current board's path — to streamline the process to make it easier for residential developers to build houses — was not why he was elected.
NEWS
By Jonah Goldberg | November 28, 2011
Whether the matchup between Newt Gingrich and Mitt Romney is the final bout on the GOP primary card is impossible to know. The whole season has been more like professional wrestling than boxing, with weird characters sporting implausible hair appearing out of nowhere to talk smack and explain why they are the greatest in the world. (I'm looking at you in particular, Mr. Trump.) Still, let's assume for the moment that it's a Gingrich-Romney contest. It's quite a matchup. Mr. Romney has been brutalized for having too little personality, Mr. Gingrich for having way, way too much.
NEWS
By Scott Shane and Scott Shane,SUN STAFF | December 21, 1997
Amid the landslide of catalogs and Christmas cards in the December mail, an envelope catches your eye: a guardian angel in purple ink spreading her considerable wings over two purple children. The inscription says, "There's an angel inside just for you!"You're skeptical. You're curious. You open it.You take the brass-colored angel pin from the letter inside and read about Kevin, the toddler severely burned by a space heater in his dilapidated home on a Northern Cheyenne reservation.And, maybe, moved by the holiday spirit and a little copywriting magic, you check the box marked "Yes!
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | December 26, 1991
MOSCOW -- Having changed history in ways that other world leaders can only dream about, Soviet President Mikhail S. Gorbachev left the Kremlin with a new mission: extending the philosophy of his reforms more widely in the world and protecting that heritage at home.It is the occupation of an elder statesman -- a Willy Brandt, a Winston Churchill -- and a role that Gorbachev covets, for it redeems him from the defeat he suffered in trying to preserve the Soviet Union.Gorbachev asked in his farewell address yesterday to be remembered for what he had accomplished, a political and social transformation so vast that it could not be conceived when he assumed the Kremlin leadership.
NEWS
By Frank Langfitt and Frank Langfitt,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | January 17, 2002
NEW DELHI, India - He is silver-haired, a long-standing conservative and projects the relaxed demeanor of a kindly grandfather. His oratorical skills have earned him a reputation as the best Hindi-language public speaker of his generation. Even secularists who disagree with the politics of his Hindu nationalist Bharatiya Janata Party find Indian Prime Minister Atal Bihari Vajpayee hard to dislike. "Every Indian has grown up with Vajpayee," said Kanti P. Bajpai, a professor at the Center of International Politics, Organization and Disarmament at Jawaharlal Nehru University here.
NEWS
By C. Fraser Smith and C. Fraser Smith,Staff Writer | July 13, 1992
NEW YORK -- Maryland's 100-member delegation plunged into the whirl of the Democratic Party convention yesterday hoping for a new beginning at the national level but trusting in its own elder statesman."
NEWS
By CHRIS LANDERS and CHRIS LANDERS,CAPITAL NEWS SERVICE | November 20, 2005
As area residents tuck into their traditional Maryland crab cakes and sauerkraut this Thanksgiving Day, they might want to take a moment away from all the palaver about pilgrims and Plymouth Rock to reflect on the Maryland statesman who really created the national holiday celebrated Thursday - John Hanson of Charles County. Or so say Hanson supporters. Actually, there is considerable disagreement among historians on who established the holiday. Hanson served as "President of the United States in Congress Assembled" under the Articles of Confederation in 1781 and '82. The Articles preceded the U.S. Constitution as an organizing document among the colonies.
NEWS
By Aamer Madhani and Aamer Madhani,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | June 29, 2005
BAGHDAD, Iraq - A Shiite member of Iraq's parliament was assassinated yesterday as he made his way from his home to a National Assembly meeting in the capital on the first anniversary of the transfer of power to Iraqi authorities. President Bush marked the anniversary with a speech to a prime-time television audience in the United States, but there was little fanfare in Baghdad. Across Iraq, violence continued unabated. Suicide bombers killed two U.S. soldiers in separate attacks, the U.S. military reported.
EXPLORE
June 22, 2011
A recent meeting of the Board of County Commissioners — in which members discussed changing the sprinkler system requirements for residences — revealed a refreshing, enlightening and, frankly, astonishing statement from one of the commissioners. Haven Shoemaker was quoted as declaring the discussion "silly," and it concerned him that the current board's path — to streamline the process to make it easier for residential developers to build houses — was not why he was elected.
NEWS
By James Oliphant and Tribune Newspapers | February 21, 2010
Alexander Haig's life threaded through some of the most tumultuous episodes of the second half of the 20th century. An Army officer in Vietnam, a presidential adviser during the Watergate scandal and a key Cabinet member during the attempted assassination of President Ronald Reagan, he was a combat warrior who found himself a diplomat, a career military man who became the consummate political insider. He died Saturday at Johns Hopkins Hospital in Baltimore from a staph infection he had before being admitted, a hospital spokeswoman said.
NEWS
By LEONARD PITTS | March 23, 2009
On the day the last newspaper is published, I expect no sympathy card from Kwame Kilpatrick. Were it not for a newspaper - The Detroit Free Press - his use of public funds to cover up his affair with one of his aides would be unrevealed, and he might still be mayor of Detroit. Nor will I expect flowers from Larry Craig. Were it not for a newspaper - The Idaho Statesman - we would not know of his propensity for taking a "wide stance" in airport men's rooms and he might still be serving in the U.S. Senate.
NEWS
By Paul Adams and Paul Adams,Sun reporter | June 20, 2008
CLEVELAND - The troubles for Ferris, Baker Watts Inc. started in this city 20 years ago with an unlikely friendship. David A. Dadante was an admitted drug user and blackjack addict who faced foreclosure on his suburban home after a string of bad luck at the tables in 1989. The Atlantic City, N.J., casino host reached out to Frank Regalbuto, a self-made millionaire, horse breeder and elder statesman of Cleveland's Italian-American community. Regalbuto bought Dadante's house and allowed his family to stay there at little charge.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,Sun reporter | January 4, 2008
Dr. Delores Cawthon Hunt, an educator who was called "the elder statesman of the Anne Arundel County school board," died Dec. 26 of old-age complications at her Arundel on the Bay home. She was 98. She was born Delores Cawthon in Blakely, Ga., a farming community. "I remember my mother huddling all of us in the house when the Klan would ride and bolting all the doors and windows," she said in 1980 Sun interview. "And we would worry about my father, somewhere in the darkness, trying to make it home."
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | November 26, 2006
WASHINGTON -- Everyone in Washington knows that President Bush has a lot riding on the Iraq Study Group, the bipartisan panel searching for an exit strategy in Iraq. But so has the man whose name has become synonymous with the group: its Republican co-chairman, James A. Baker III. The last time he dominated the news was in 2000, in Florida, when Baker -- a former secretary of state who has been a friend and a tennis partner of the first President George Bush since the current president was 13 years old -- led the legal team that delivered the White House to its current occupant.
FEATURES
By ANN HORNADAY and ANN HORNADAY,SUN FILM CRITIC | May 4, 1998
Spike Lee can be called many things, but subtle isn't one of them.Take the lead character of his new film, "He Got Game," a high school basketball star played by the Milwaukee Bucks' Ray Allen. On the eve of graduation from high school, he finds himself caught up in a vortex of agents, college recruiters, friends and family members. Everybody wants a piece of him.Allen's character is called Jesus Shuttlesworth, which is a double whammy. There's the first name, which not only has obvious connotations, but was also a nickname for Earl "The Pearl" Monroe when he was coming up in North Philadelphia.
NEWS
By CHRIS LANDERS and CHRIS LANDERS,CAPITAL NEWS SERVICE | November 20, 2005
As area residents tuck into their traditional Maryland crab cakes and sauerkraut this Thanksgiving Day, they might want to take a moment away from all the palaver about pilgrims and Plymouth Rock to reflect on the Maryland statesman who really created the national holiday celebrated Thursday - John Hanson of Charles County. Or so say Hanson supporters. Actually, there is considerable disagreement among historians on who established the holiday. Hanson served as "President of the United States in Congress Assembled" under the Articles of Confederation in 1781 and '82. The Articles preceded the U.S. Constitution as an organizing document among the colonies.
NEWS
August 7, 2005
THE QUESTION: HOW DID HOWARD COUNTY GET ITS NAME? The county was first designated the Howard District in 1839, when it was part of Anne Arundel County, according to the county's Web site. It is named after John Eager Howard, who was a statesman, soldier and the state's fifth governor. In 1851, Howard County became the 21st county in the state. Send a question of general interest to: howard.question@baltsun.com Include your name, address and telephone number if you would like to have the question acknowledged in print.
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