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By Bruce G. Blair & Henry W. Kendall | June 6, 1994
AS OF last Monday, the United States and Russia no longer aimed strategic missiles at each other.A missile fired accidentally and flying under its own normal motor power and guidance would fall short of its Cold War target, landing in stead in the Arctic Ocean. But the risk of such an accidental launch is low compared to other safety hazards. And this symbolic agreement does nothing to alleviate them.The real hazards are unauthorized firings or firings induced by false warning of inbound enemy missiles.
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NEWS
April 10, 2005
WELL, they love us in Manila. A whopping 88 percent of Filipinos think the United States has a positive influence in the world, according to an international poll sponsored by the Program on International Policy Attitudes at the University of Maryland. As for the rest of the globe? You may fire when ready. American prestige has been drooping for some time, but these new results really take the starch out. In 15 of 22 nations surveyed, the United States was viewed as having a negative influence on the world.
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NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | December 18, 2001
BEIJING - A senior U.S. State Department official met with Chinese counterparts here over the past two days in what was billed by the Americans as an effort to explain President Bush's recent decision to withdraw from the Anti-Ballistic Missile Treaty. The visit by the assistant secretary of state for arms control, Avis Bohlen, underscores the importance that the Bush administration places on maintaining good relations with China, which has sided with the United States in its war on terrorism.
NEWS
By Scott Shane and Scott Shane,SUN STAFF | June 1, 2003
With a record-setting 2 million people locked up in American jails and prisons, the United States has overtaken Russia and has a higher percentage of its citizens behind bars than any other country. Those are the latest dreary milestones resulting from a two-decade imprisonment boom that experts say has probably helped reduce crime but also has created ballooning costs and stark racial inequities. Overseas, U.S. imprisonment policy is widely seen as a blot on a society that prides itself on valuing liberty and just went to war to overturn Saddam Hussein's despotic rule in Iraq.
NEWS
By Mark Matthews and Mark Matthews,Washington Bureau of The Sun | May 5, 1995
WASHINGTON -- Call it the "warts and all" summit.Not since the 1991 collapse of the Soviet Union have tensions between the United States and Russia been as exposed as they will be next week in Moscow, when President Clinton holds his fourth summit with Russian President Boris N. Yeltsin.The United States vehemently opposes Russia's plans to sell technology to Iran that could help produce nuclear weapons. Russia just as deeply resents the Clinton administration's plans -- vague though they are -- to expand the North Atlantic Treaty Organization eastward.
NEWS
By Mark Matthews and Mark Matthews,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | December 14, 2001
WASHINGTON -- President Bush announced yesterday that the United States will withdraw from the 1972 Anti-Ballistic Missile Treaty with Russia, declaring that the move would make this country safer against terrorists and rogue states by lifting restraints on building a defense against incoming missiles. There were no immediate signs that Bush's decision had weakened the two countries' growing partnership on a range of global problems. Russian President Vladimir V. Putin called Bush's action a mistake.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | May 15, 2002
REYKJAVIK, Iceland - More than 50 years after its founding and a decade after the end of the Cold War, the North Atlantic Treaty Organization approved yesterday a landmark agreement accepting Russia, the former enemy it was formed to fight, into a new partnership with the West on terrorism, arms control and international crisis management in a post-Sept. 11 world. "Together, the countries that spent four decades glowering at each other across the wall of hatred and fear now have the opportunity to transform Euro-Atlantic security for the better," said NATO's secretary-general, George Robertson, at a meeting of foreign ministers here.
NEWS
By Doyle McManus and Doyle McManus,Los Angeles Times | June 24, 1993
WASHINGTON -- President Clinton's proudest foreign policy achievement, his program for large-scale multinational aid for Russia, has suffered a pair of embarrassing and unexpected setbacks, leaving U.S. officials scrambling to recover.An ambitious Clinton plan to raise $4 billion to reform Russia's giant state-owned enterprises and turn into private companies abruptly shrunk to an initial $500 million after Japan and other allies balked at the president's price tag, U.S. officials said yesterday.
NEWS
April 10, 2005
WELL, they love us in Manila. A whopping 88 percent of Filipinos think the United States has a positive influence in the world, according to an international poll sponsored by the Program on International Policy Attitudes at the University of Maryland. As for the rest of the globe? You may fire when ready. American prestige has been drooping for some time, but these new results really take the starch out. In 15 of 22 nations surveyed, the United States was viewed as having a negative influence on the world.
NEWS
By Mark Matthews and Mark Matthews,Washington Bureau | May 2, 1992
WASHINGTON -- The United States is close to an agreement with Ukraine on implementing a strategic arms accord reached with the former Soviet Union, U.S. officials said.A deal would mark a breakthrough toward ratification of the pact and assures a warm embrace for Ukrainian President Leonid M. Kravchuk on his visit here next week.Secretary of State James A. Baker III has postponed sending the treaty, which slashes long-range nuclear weapons, to Capitol Hill for ratification until all four nuclear states of the former Soviet Union -- Russia, Ukraine, Belarus and Kazakhstan -- agree to abide by its terms.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | May 15, 2002
REYKJAVIK, Iceland - More than 50 years after its founding and a decade after the end of the Cold War, the North Atlantic Treaty Organization approved yesterday a landmark agreement accepting Russia, the former enemy it was formed to fight, into a new partnership with the West on terrorism, arms control and international crisis management in a post-Sept. 11 world. "Together, the countries that spent four decades glowering at each other across the wall of hatred and fear now have the opportunity to transform Euro-Atlantic security for the better," said NATO's secretary-general, George Robertson, at a meeting of foreign ministers here.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | December 18, 2001
BEIJING - A senior U.S. State Department official met with Chinese counterparts here over the past two days in what was billed by the Americans as an effort to explain President Bush's recent decision to withdraw from the Anti-Ballistic Missile Treaty. The visit by the assistant secretary of state for arms control, Avis Bohlen, underscores the importance that the Bush administration places on maintaining good relations with China, which has sided with the United States in its war on terrorism.
NEWS
By Mark Matthews and Mark Matthews,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | December 14, 2001
WASHINGTON -- President Bush announced yesterday that the United States will withdraw from the 1972 Anti-Ballistic Missile Treaty with Russia, declaring that the move would make this country safer against terrorists and rogue states by lifting restraints on building a defense against incoming missiles. There were no immediate signs that Bush's decision had weakened the two countries' growing partnership on a range of global problems. Russian President Vladimir V. Putin called Bush's action a mistake.
NEWS
By Kathy Lally and Kathy Lally,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | June 6, 2000
MOSCOW - His cadence bore a faint sadness, his phrasing bespoke regret, but Bill Clinton's empathy rose to perfect pitch yesterday as he addressed Russia's parliament for the first - and no doubt last - time as president of the United States of America. Clinton had just concluded a summit with Vladimir V. Putin, the new Russian president, and he seemed to mourn the missed opportunity of yesterday as intensely as he celebrated the possibility of tomorrow. "We Americans have to overcome the temptation to think that we have all the answers," Clinton said.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,SUN STAFF | November 5, 1996
Earthlings launch their most ambitious invasion of Mars this week, with the planned liftoff of the first in a 10-year series of robotic explorers to the Red Planet.NASA's Mars Global Surveyor is set to blast off from Cape Canaveral, Fla., just after noon tomorrow. It should begin orbiting Mars on Sept. 11 for a two-year study of the planet's atmosphere, its surface geology and interior physics.Two more spacecraft -- NASA's Mars Pathfinder and Russia's Mars '96 mission -- will join the Mars-bound squadron during the next four weeks.
NEWS
By Mark Matthews and Mark Matthews,Washington Bureau of The Sun | May 5, 1995
WASHINGTON -- Call it the "warts and all" summit.Not since the 1991 collapse of the Soviet Union have tensions between the United States and Russia been as exposed as they will be next week in Moscow, when President Clinton holds his fourth summit with Russian President Boris N. Yeltsin.The United States vehemently opposes Russia's plans to sell technology to Iran that could help produce nuclear weapons. Russia just as deeply resents the Clinton administration's plans -- vague though they are -- to expand the North Atlantic Treaty Organization eastward.
NEWS
By Mark Matthews and Carl M. Cannon and Mark Matthews and Carl M. Cannon,Washington Bureau of The Sun | February 24, 1994
WASHINGTON -- Bit by painful bit, it's becoming clearer that while the United States and Russia are not the enemies they used to be, they are far from being the best of friends.The arrest of a CIA official on charges of selling sensitive secrets to the Russians is part of a recent pattern of events that brings post-Cold War Russia into clearer focus.Amid economic chaos and a painful transition to democracy, Russia views itself as a great power with interests that at times clash with the United States'.
NEWS
By Mark Matthews and Mark Matthews,Washington Bureau of The Sun | December 14, 1994
WASHINGTON -- After veering from being enemies to being friends, the United States and Russia have settled uncomfortably in between.And the political weakness of Presidents Bill Clinton and Boris N. Yeltsin threatens to make the relationship worse.Four years after the collapse of the Soviet Union all but buried the threat of mutual nuclear incineration, the two countries are chafing over such post-Cold War problems as Bosnia, Iraq and the expansion of NATO. And with Russia still struggling to create durable democratic institutions, the former rival states face new strains as a result of Republican pressure in Congress to cut U.S. aid to Russia.
NEWS
By Mark Matthews and Mark Matthews,Washington Bureau of The Sun | December 14, 1994
WASHINGTON -- After veering from being enemies to being friends, the United States and Russia have settled uncomfortably in between.And the political weakness of Presidents Bill Clinton and Boris N. Yeltsin threatens to make the relationship worse.Four years after the collapse of the Soviet Union all but buried the threat of mutual nuclear incineration, the two countries are chafing over such post-Cold War problems as Bosnia, Iraq and the expansion of NATO. And with Russia still struggling to create durable democratic institutions, the former rival states face new strains as a result of Republican pressure in Congress to cut U.S. aid to Russia.
NEWS
By Mark Matthews and Mark Matthews,Washington Bureau of The Sun | December 14, 1994
WASHINGTON -- After veering from being enemies to being friends, the United States and Russia have settled uncomfortably in between.And the political weakness of Presidents Bill Clinton and Boris N. Yeltsin threatens to make the relationship worse.Four years after the collapse of the Soviet Union all but buried the threat of mutual nuclear incineration, the two countries are chafing over such post-Cold War problems as Bosnia, Iraq and the expansion of NATO. And with Russia still struggling to create durable democratic institutions, the former rival states face new strains as a result of Republican pressure in Congress to cut U.S. aid to Russia.
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