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By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | January 15, 1996
WASHINGTON -- After four days of intense talks that ended yesterday morning in Honolulu, the United States and North Korea came close to agreement on a joint mission to recover the remains of thousands of American servicemen killed in the Korean War, U.S. officials said.The talks were the first of their kind since the war ended in 1953, and the fact that they took place at all was seen as a significant diplomatic development.Though the United States and North Korea began discussing the recovery and repatriation of the lost soldiers in 1987, the meeting in Hawaii was the first in which a joint effort was seriously discussed.
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By Jeff Barker, The Baltimore Sun | January 21, 2012
Maryland coach Mark Turgeon has plenty to be concerned about. Road games, for one. The Terps (12-5, 2-2 Atlantic Coast Conference) are winless in their first two Atlantic Coast Conference away games, surrendering an average of 81.5 points — far too many to suit the defensive-minded coach. In recent games, the young Terps have lacked a reliable second scorer to complement sophomore Terrell Stoglin, who has taken nearly twice as many shots this season as any teammate. The team's inexperience is often exposed.
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NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | March 22, 1998
GENEVA -- A week of talks aimed at creating a framework for peace on the tense Korean peninsula ended in an impasse yesterday with the United States and North Korea blaming each other for the failure.The sticking point was the North Korean insistence that withdrawal of U.S. troops from South Korea be a key item on the agenda of the talks, which involve South Korea, North Korea, the United States and China. U.S. officials have repeatedly refused that demand, prompting North Korea's chief negotiator, Kim Gye Gwan, to say that he did not see the point of continuing discussions.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | March 19, 2007
BEIJING -- The United States and North Korea have resolved a standoff over North Korean funds frozen in a bank account in Macao, clearing the way for talks to focus on putting in place a nuclear disarmament accord, Chinese and American officials said yesterday. Christopher R. Hill, an assistant secretary of state who is the chief American envoy at the talks, said he met with representatives from the North Korean delegation over the weekend to explain the American position on $25 million in North Korea-related accounts in Macao's Banco Delta Asia.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | March 19, 2007
BEIJING -- The United States and North Korea have resolved a standoff over North Korean funds frozen in a bank account in Macao, clearing the way for talks to focus on putting in place a nuclear disarmament accord, Chinese and American officials said yesterday. Christopher R. Hill, an assistant secretary of state who is the chief American envoy at the talks, said he met with representatives from the North Korean delegation over the weekend to explain the American position on $25 million in North Korea-related accounts in Macao's Banco Delta Asia.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | February 27, 2004
BEIJING - The United States, North Korea and four other nations discussed yesterday freezing North Korea's nuclear program in exchange for energy aid. But the continuing talks here also exposed stark disagreements that left diplomats wondering whether they could emerge with much more than a commitment to keep negotiating. The United States and North Korea appeared to make modest concessions at the talks, several participants said, and the tone was described as constructive and lacking the invective that often punctuates discussions with North Korea.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | December 22, 2006
BEIJING --Talks between the United States and North Korea hit a significant obstacle yesterday, as diplomats said the two sides sharply disagreed over whether relaxing an American-led crackdown on the Pyongyang regime's financial transactions should be part of any deal to roll back its nuclear program. Assistant Secretary of State Christopher Hill said yesterday that North Korean negotiators were determined to link the two issues, and that the United States is equally determined not to. The new difficulties were the latest turn in an up-and-down week of talks given new urgency after North Korea's test detonation of a nuclear device Oct. 9, the country's first.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | January 17, 1999
GENEVA -- With tensions rising on the Korean peninsula, the United States and North Korea opened new talks here yesterday over whether North Korea would allow inspections of a suspected underground nuclear facility.The talks, which are to continue today, precede a new round of four-way meetings planned here next week aimed at reaching a formal peace treaty for the peninsula, where war ended 46 years ago.This would be the fourth such gathering in the past 13 months of North and South Korea and their chief allies, China and the United States.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | June 13, 1995
SEOUL, South Korea -- The United States and North Korea have reached an agreement on providing up-to-date nuclear reactors to North Korea, clearing a major hurdle toward the dismantling of that country's suspected atomic weapons program, officials said today."
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | April 23, 2003
BEIJING - U.S. envoys arrived yesterday for talks with North Korea on its nuclear weapons program, breaking a six-month diplomatic impasse and at least temporarily easing fears of a military confrontation between the Korean War enemies. James A. Kelly, assistant secretary of state for Asia and Pacific affairs, is leading the U.S. delegation at the trilateral talks, which include China. The talks, scheduled to start this morning and continue through Friday, will be the first direct negotiations since October, when North Korea acknowledged that it had begun to enrich uranium in contravention of a 1994 pact to end its nuclear weapons program.
NEWS
By Mitchell Landsberg and Mitchell Landsberg,Los Angeles Times | December 23, 2006
BEIJING -- Disarmament talks with North Korea recessed yesterday in another round of frustration for the United States and its allies, with analysts saying that there appears to be little hope in the foreseeable future that Pyongyong will agree to abandon its nuclear weapons program. "Of course, we're disappointed," said the chief U.S. negotiator, Christopher Hill, after a week of six-nation talks came to an end without a glimmer of an agreement. He said it became apparent as the week progressed that the North Korean delegates had no authorization from their leaders to compromise, so that "interesting" informal discussions had no chance of turning into formal agreements.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | December 22, 2006
BEIJING --Talks between the United States and North Korea hit a significant obstacle yesterday, as diplomats said the two sides sharply disagreed over whether relaxing an American-led crackdown on the Pyongyang regime's financial transactions should be part of any deal to roll back its nuclear program. Assistant Secretary of State Christopher Hill said yesterday that North Korean negotiators were determined to link the two issues, and that the United States is equally determined not to. The new difficulties were the latest turn in an up-and-down week of talks given new urgency after North Korea's test detonation of a nuclear device Oct. 9, the country's first.
NEWS
By Mark Magnier and Mark Magnier,LOS ANGELES TIMES | November 1, 2006
BEIJING -- North Korea agreed yesterday to return to negotiations aimed at halting its nuclear weapons program, three weeks after the regime conducted its first nuclear test. The reversal was hammered out during a day of informal meetings organized by China that also involved the United States and North Korea. The North set no conditions for its return to the bargaining table with sessions expected to begin next month, U.S. Assistant Secretary of State Christopher Hill told reporters at a hastily arranged news conference.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | June 21, 2006
WASHINGTON -- North Korea said yesterday that it is not bound by its own moratorium on long-range missile tests, as tension over Pyongyang's intentions continued to mount. In Washington, a senior State Department official challenged North Korea's interpretation, saying that the United States expects the Pyongyang government to abide by its commitments. A North Korean Foreign Ministry official had told Japanese reporters that a missile test would not be "bound by any statement such as the Pyongyang Declaration," the Kyodo news agency reported.
NEWS
By Gady A. Epstein and Gady A. Epstein,Sun foreign reporter | September 20, 2005
BEIJING -- North Korea's promise yesterday to end its development of nuclear weapons and accept international inspections was a surprising breakthrough in talks in Beijing, but also left formidable obstacles for the United States and North Korea's other negotiating partners. North Korea's pledge - the first the country has offered in writing to dismantle its nuclear weapons program - was part of a joint statement of principles issued by the diplomats of six nations, including the United States.
NEWS
By Gady A. Epstein and Gady A. Epstein,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | July 25, 2005
BEIJING - The United States and North Korea will resume meeting this week during a new round of six-nation talks over Pyongyang's nuclear program, and each side appears anxious to see whether the other is prepared to drop its confrontational stance and make a deal. It is clear that the six-way talks beginning tomorrow are mostly about the two leading antagonists: a prickly, difficult-to-read and probably nuclear-armed regime on one side and an American administration with an icy disposition on the other.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | June 11, 1995
SEOUL, South Korea -- The United States and North Korea have reached tentative understandings at talks in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia, aimed at carrying out an accord to halt the North's suspected nuclear weapons program, officials of both countries said yesterday.But obstacles to a final agreement still remain in Seoul.South Korean officials say the proposed accord does not go far enough in specifying that South Korea will play a central role in providing light-water nuclear reactors to the North.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | May 11, 2005
BEIJING - China has ruled out applying economic or political sanctions to pressure North Korea to abandon its nuclear weapons program and still hopes negotiations can succeed in achieving that result, a Foreign Ministry official said yesterday. China has come under intensifying pressure from the United States to stiffen its approach to North Korea. Its announcement yesterday is certain to disappoint the Bush administration. Chinese officials acknowledge privately that they have grown increasingly frustrated with North Korea's refusal to resume six-nation negotiations that have been stalled since last year.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | May 11, 2005
BEIJING - China has ruled out applying economic or political sanctions to pressure North Korea to abandon its nuclear weapons program and still hopes negotiations can succeed in achieving that result, a Foreign Ministry official said yesterday. China has come under intensifying pressure from the United States to stiffen its approach to North Korea. Its announcement yesterday is certain to disappoint the Bush administration. Chinese officials acknowledge privately that they have grown increasingly frustrated with North Korea's refusal to resume six-nation negotiations that have been stalled since last year.
NEWS
By Paul Richter and Paul Richter,LOS ANGELES TIMES | February 12, 2005
WASHINGTON - The White House rejected yesterday North Korean demands for one-on-one talks with the United States, saying it will discuss Pyongyang's nuclear program only if four neighboring governments also take part. Japan, China and South Korea joined the U.S. call for North Korea to return to the stalled six-party disarmament talks, a sign of continuing support for the group approach adopted by the Bush administration. A day after North Korea surprised the world by publicly declaring its nuclear capability, White House press secretary Scott McClellan said, "It's not an issue between the United States and North Korea.
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