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By THE (HACKENSACK, N.J.) RECORD | October 28, 2006
Basically, we're maintaining truck stops for birds. The birds stop in, refuel, and then keep on truckin'." - DAN HILL, a biologist who maintains the Wallkill National Wildlife Refuge, a 5,000-acre reservation in Sussex County, N.J., that's a popular stop for migratory birds during their autumnal trek from Canada's breeding grounds to the warmer climates in the southern United States and Mexico
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NEWS
By THE (HACKENSACK, N.J.) RECORD | October 28, 2006
Basically, we're maintaining truck stops for birds. The birds stop in, refuel, and then keep on truckin'." - DAN HILL, a biologist who maintains the Wallkill National Wildlife Refuge, a 5,000-acre reservation in Sussex County, N.J., that's a popular stop for migratory birds during their autumnal trek from Canada's breeding grounds to the warmer climates in the southern United States and Mexico
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NEWS
By Knight-Ridder News Service | December 12, 1991
WASHINGTON -- When the president of Mexico visits him Saturday, President Bush is expected to hit Carlos Salinas de Gortari with this piece of bad news: The proposed free-trade agreement between the United States and Mexico is on hold, possibly until after the 1992 presidential election.A prolonged recession in the United States and Mr. Bush's suddenly uncertain re-election dooms consummation of the controversial pact until late next year at the earliest, both supporters and opponents say."
NEWS
By NADIA MARTINEZ AND CHUCK COLLINS | June 30, 2006
Mexico's presidential and congressional elections Sunday will have significant implications in the United States. For U.S. citizens concerned about the flow of immigrants, a win by the leftist Andres Manuel Lopez Obrador may do more to effectively address the conditions of poverty pushing Mexicans over the U.S. border in search of work than a victory by any of the other candidates. The final opinion polls show Mr. Lopez Obrador of the liberal Democratic Revolutionary Party (PRD) with a 2 percent to 5 percent lead over Felipe Calderon, the candidate of the conservative and incumbent National Action Party (PAN)
NEWS
By Cox News Service | June 17, 1992
MEXICO CITY -- One day after it suspended U.S. anti-drug operations in a dispute over extradition policy, Mexico began negotiations with U.S. officials yesterday to revise the extradition treaty between the two nations.U.S. officials said they were confident that the two nations would continue to work together to fight drug trafficking, although it was not clear whether joint operations were under way last night.Mexico's Foreign Ministry said U.S. officials had agreed to "proceed with the revision of the extradition treaty."
NEWS
By Stephen Franklin and Hugh Dellios and Stephen Franklin and Hugh Dellios,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | August 17, 2005
NOGALES, Ariz. - Saying their states are reeling from growing drug trafficking and illegal migration, the governors of Arizona and New Mexico have declared states of emergency along their borders with Mexico. Gov. Janet Napolitano of Arizona has freed up $1.5 million in disaster funds to assist state agencies and border counties, while New Mexico Gov. Bill Richardson defended his recent decision to declare an emergency, saying states must take security into their own hands. In response, Mexican officials have described the governors' declarations as exaggerations and called for cooperation between the two countries to calm the border area.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | January 4, 1994
OTAY MESA, Calif. -- He was only dimly aware of it, but Tomas Estrada helped make trade history yesterday.The young truck driver from Tijuana, Mexico, wheeled up to the U.S. Customs dock here with a white truck full of 6,368 women's blouses, 1,657 pairs of pants, 3,910 shorts and 3,974 girls' headbands -- all assembled in Mexico and destined for Los Angeles.They were among the first cargoes to enter the United States at reduced tariffs under the North American Free Trade Agreement.But if anyone expected a rush to take advantage of the new, reduced duties, that didn't happen.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES | August 10, 2001
WASHINGTON - The United States and Mexico agreed in principle yesterday to an expanded temporary worker program that would allow some of the estimated 3 million Mexicans living here unlawfully to earn permanent legal residency, officials from both governments said. After meeting for nearly two hours, Secretary of State Colin L. Powell and Attorney General John Ashcroft joined their Mexican counterparts, Jorge G. Castaneda and Santiago Creel, at a news conference to announce what Powell called a "shared commitment" to employ a "humane, family-friendly" migration policy.
NEWS
December 4, 1993
No barrier remains to the North American Free Trade Agreement coming into force on New Year's Day. The legislatures of Canada, the United States and Mexico ratified it. What remained was the refusal of the new Liberal Party prime minister of Canada, Jean Chretien, to "proclaim" what a lame-duck Conservative parliament enacted. But after NAFTA's uphill victory in the U.S. House of Representatives, Mr. Chretien lost his ally in this business. If he was going to obstruct, he was going to do it alone and in a spotlight.
NEWS
By JEANE KIRKPATRICK | November 23, 1993
-- Washington. The debate over North American Free Trade Agreement came about as close to class war as American politics ever gets. The conflict did not rest on a misunderstanding. It reflected a real conflict of real values.No one denied that eliminating barriers to investment and trade between the United States and Mexico would cost the United States some jobs. But NAFTA supporters denied that the low-wage jobs that will be lost to Mexico's low wage economy are worth saving.No one denied that new jobs would be created in the high-tech industries in which the United States has a comparative advantage.
NEWS
By Stephen Franklin and Hugh Dellios and Stephen Franklin and Hugh Dellios,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | August 17, 2005
NOGALES, Ariz. - Saying their states are reeling from growing drug trafficking and illegal migration, the governors of Arizona and New Mexico have declared states of emergency along their borders with Mexico. Gov. Janet Napolitano of Arizona has freed up $1.5 million in disaster funds to assist state agencies and border counties, while New Mexico Gov. Bill Richardson defended his recent decision to declare an emergency, saying states must take security into their own hands. In response, Mexican officials have described the governors' declarations as exaggerations and called for cooperation between the two countries to calm the border area.
SPORTS
By Chris Cowles and Chris Cowles,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | March 27, 2005
MEXICO CITY - There's never a dull moment when the United States and Mexico meet in men's soccer, and today - in the 50th encounter between the teams - another chapter will be added to what is becoming one of the sport's greatest rivalries. Although not quite of the epic proportions of England-Germany or Brazil-Argentina, U.S.-Mexico remains the region's biggest matchup and today (ESPN2, Telemundo, 1 p.m.), when they play in Mexico City in what is their most significant matchup since the 2002 World Cup, it will be the host team that has something to prove.
SPORTS
By Grahame L. Jones and Grahame L. Jones,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | June 16, 2002
SEOUL, South Korea -- Cobi Jones and Jorge Campos always got along well when they were teammates on the Los Angeles Galaxy, and their friendship continues to this day. The U.S. national team midfielder and the Mexico national team goalkeeper recognized in each other the same spirit of fun. They played the game because it paid them well, but also because they enjoyed it. That enjoyment showed in their on-field performances and their off-field antics....
NEWS
By Allison Klein and Allison Klein,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | October 21, 2001
EL PASO, Texas - Stuart England installed a television in his van last week because his commute home from Ciudad Juarez, the Mexican border town where he works, has been too excruciating to bear since Sept. 11. He can use some diversion while stuck in the seemingly endless queues of cars waiting to cross the Paso del Norte bridge into El Paso, Texas. "I saw someone in line next to me with a TV and I was trying to watch it, so I figured I should get my own," said England, a manager in a maquiladora, a factory where materials are imported from the United States, assembled duty-free and sent back across the border.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES | August 10, 2001
WASHINGTON - The United States and Mexico agreed in principle yesterday to an expanded temporary worker program that would allow some of the estimated 3 million Mexicans living here unlawfully to earn permanent legal residency, officials from both governments said. After meeting for nearly two hours, Secretary of State Colin L. Powell and Attorney General John Ashcroft joined their Mexican counterparts, Jorge G. Castaneda and Santiago Creel, at a news conference to announce what Powell called a "shared commitment" to employ a "humane, family-friendly" migration policy.
TOPIC
By George W. Grayson | July 8, 2001
MEXICO CITY - Monday marked the first anniversary of Vicente Fox's victory over the deeply entrenched Institutional Revolutionary Party (PRI). Known as the "Marlboro Man" because of his 6-foot-5-inch height and rugged good looks, President Fox has not only opened a new chapter in politics at home, he has persistently wooed the United States, even as he acts to reduce dependence on the "colossus of the North." For years, Sen. Jesse Helms of North Carolina - ever the family grouch - rejected Mexican suitors as good-for-nothings because of their penchant for corruption, drug trafficking and rigged elections.
NEWS
By Erik Nelson and Erik Nelson,Staff Writer | February 12, 1992
Jordan Spector, a North Laurel businessman, has spent five months and thousands of dollars fighting to get his stolen truck out of Mexico.He found out Monday he has only business 15 days to retrieve it, or the Mexican government can claim it as its own.The refrigerated box truck, emblazoned with "Blue Ribbon Food Service," was stolen Sept. 14 from the parking lot at his wholesale food warehouse. Mexican federal police recovered it near the Guatemalan border less than a week later.How it got there, Mr. Spector doesn't know.
NEWS
By NADIA MARTINEZ AND CHUCK COLLINS | June 30, 2006
Mexico's presidential and congressional elections Sunday will have significant implications in the United States. For U.S. citizens concerned about the flow of immigrants, a win by the leftist Andres Manuel Lopez Obrador may do more to effectively address the conditions of poverty pushing Mexicans over the U.S. border in search of work than a victory by any of the other candidates. The final opinion polls show Mr. Lopez Obrador of the liberal Democratic Revolutionary Party (PRD) with a 2 percent to 5 percent lead over Felipe Calderon, the candidate of the conservative and incumbent National Action Party (PAN)
NEWS
By Jaime Suchlicki | November 28, 2000
MIAMI -- With all the turmoil accompanying the election of our own president, a presidency of vital historic and strategic interest is about to begin right in our back yard. The United States must not lose track of Vicente Fox, who on Friday will become Mexico's first president in 71 years from a party other than the Revolutionary Institutional Party (PRI). Although congressional and judicial powers have recently been strengthened in Mexico, presidential power remains supreme and extensive, and this tradition is unlikely to change soon.
BUSINESS
By Jay Hancock and Jay Hancock,Sun Staff Writer | April 2, 1995
To understand why home improvement chain Hechinger Co. is suspending plans for stores in Mexico, consider that a basic Stanley-brand hammer would now sell there for 40 pesos. That's almost two days' wages for an average Mexican.Consider that construction of Mexican shopping centers, wherethe new stores would be, has nearly stopped. Consider that interest rates approaching 100 percent have quashed home sales, the spark of solvency for any home improvement chain."It's going to be real difficult for a U.S. company to ever go down there and open stores until that situation gets under control," said W. Clark McClelland, executive vice president of Landover-based Hechinger.
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