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By Mark Matthews and Mark Matthews,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | May 16, 1997
WASHINGTON -- The United States, in a significant policy shift, is asking its two biggest aid recipients -- Israel and Egypt -- to give up part of their U.S. aid to help their struggling neighbor, Jordan.Officials declined to give the amounts being discussed. But one source who is involved with U.S. aid to Israel said Washington had asked Israel and Egypt to give up $50 million each.Jordan is getting about $65 million this year, and the Clinton administration is asking Congress to give Jordan $100 million next year.
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NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | August 3, 2006
WASHINGTON -- Most Americans consider Israel's bombing campaign in Lebanon justified, but they are divided over what role the United States should play in the crisis and how closely the U.S. should align itself with the Jewish state, a Los Angeles Times/Bloomberg poll has found. The survey, conducted between Friday and Tuesday, also found that U.S. public opinion on the Middle East situation was evolving, with support for U.S. engagement in the conflict rising steadily along with the death toll - particularly after Sunday's Israeli airstrike that killed dozens of civilians in the southern Lebanon town of Qana.
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NEWS
By Robert Ruby and Robert Ruby,Sun Staff Correspondent | January 14, 1991
DHAHRAN, Saudi Arabia -- Whatever actions Iraq takes before the deadline for its withdrawal from Kuwait, the Arab world has given the United States another indirect warning that the anti-Iraq coalition will be difficult to maintain in either peace or war.Remarks during the weekend by Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak and Farouq el Sharaa, Syria's foreign minister, highlighted differing viewpoints of Washington's Arab allies, especially over how they might...
NEWS
By DAVID WOOD and DAVID WOOD,SUN REPORTER | July 23, 2006
WASHINGTON -- Amid the chilling scenes of flame and rubble and refugees in the Middle East last week came a sobering lesson for Americans: This is a virulent new form of warfare for which the United States and other conventional powers are ill-prepared. The militant force of Hezbollah has elevated the art of insurgency to a bloody and frightening new level. It has demonstrated a capacity for massed salvos of rockets - and even a high-tech anti-ship missile that struck an Israeli warship - and left Israel and the United States groping for a few good options.
NEWS
By Mark Matthews and Mark Matthews,Washington Bureau of The Sun | December 12, 1990
WASHINGTON -- President Bush pledged not to make peace with Iraq at Israel's expense, Prime Minister Yitzhak Shamir reported yesterday, as the United States and Israel made cautious early moves to restart the search for Middle East peace once the Persian Gulf crisis is settled.Mr. Shamir was expected to hold what his spokesman said was "evidently a meeting of importance" today with Soviet Foreign Minister Eduard A. Shevardnadze. The Soviet Union, which has not formally restored relations with Israel that were broken in 1967, has pressed for an international conference to settle a range of Middle East disputes.
NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | August 3, 2006
WASHINGTON -- Most Americans consider Israel's bombing campaign in Lebanon justified, but they are divided over what role the United States should play in the crisis and how closely the U.S. should align itself with the Jewish state, a Los Angeles Times/Bloomberg poll has found. The survey, conducted between Friday and Tuesday, also found that U.S. public opinion on the Middle East situation was evolving, with support for U.S. engagement in the conflict rising steadily along with the death toll - particularly after Sunday's Israeli airstrike that killed dozens of civilians in the southern Lebanon town of Qana.
NEWS
By Mark Matthews and Mark Matthews,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | February 7, 2002
WASHINGTON - Capitalizing on his adversary's missteps, Israel's hard-line prime minister, Ariel Sharon, has forged a relationship with the United States that rivals the one enjoyed by his dovish predecessor, Ehud Barak. When he meets this afternoon for the fourth time with President Bush - who has refused to even shake hands with Palestinian leader Yasser Arafat - Sharon will be talking with a man who, to a large extent, shares his view of the threats facing Israel and American interests in the Middle East.
NEWS
By Mark Matthews and Mark Matthews,Washington Bureau of The Sun | October 3, 1990
WASHINGTON -- Secretary of State James A. Baker III said last night that there is now a greater international willingness to consider the prospect of war with Iraq than he expected a week ago.Nearing completion of 10 days of meetings in New York with counterparts from numerous countries on the Persian Gulf crisis, Mr. Baker declined to speculate on whether there would be broad participation in military action against Iraq if economic sanctions fail....
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | September 4, 2001
DURBAN, South Africa -- The United States and Israel walked out of the United Nations meeting on racism last night, denouncing a condemnation of Israel in a proposed conference declaration and lamenting that a gathering intended to celebrate tolerance and diversity had degenerated into one torn by hate. Last night, South Africa convened emergency meetings to redraft the declaration and program of action in the hope of averting other walkouts, and a spokesman for the European Union delegation, which had also raised concerns, said its diplomats would participate in those efforts.
NEWS
By MARK MATTHEWS | July 23, 2006
WASHINGTON -- President Bush has something in common with his two nemeses, Mahmoud Ahmadinejad of Iran and Bashar Assad of Syria: All three nodded approvingly from the sidelines as their allies launched a fierce war across the Israeli-Lebanese border and in the Palestinian territories that has left hundreds of civilians dead amid scenes of destruction, dislocation and shattered lives. Mr. Bush, backing Israel, ignored the international clamor for a hasty cease-fire, encouraging Israel's two-front assault against Hezbollah in Lebanon and Hamas in the West Bank and Gaza.
NEWS
By MARK MATTHEWS | July 23, 2006
WASHINGTON -- President Bush has something in common with his two nemeses, Mahmoud Ahmadinejad of Iran and Bashar Assad of Syria: All three nodded approvingly from the sidelines as their allies launched a fierce war across the Israeli-Lebanese border and in the Palestinian territories that has left hundreds of civilians dead amid scenes of destruction, dislocation and shattered lives. Mr. Bush, backing Israel, ignored the international clamor for a hasty cease-fire, encouraging Israel's two-front assault against Hezbollah in Lebanon and Hamas in the West Bank and Gaza.
NEWS
August 31, 2004
THE DENIALS are loud and resounding. The American Israel Public Affairs Committee called allegations that the American Jewish lobby received secret information about U.S. policy on Iran from a Pentagon analyst, and passed it onto Israel, "baseless and false." The government of Israel was just as emphatic about the charge: "false and outrageous." The reported FBI investigation touched a nerve. It raised the specter of divided loyalties, Israel spying on its chief ally and benefactor, mudslinging at a pro-Israel president on the eve of his renomination.
NEWS
By Mark Matthews and Mark Matthews,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | October 17, 2002
WASHINGTON - The United States assured Israel yesterday that it would make "a maximum effort to avoid the need" for Israel to retaliate if Iraq attacked the Jewish state during a U.S. war against Saddam Hussein, Israeli officials said. On a day that marked a symbolic step toward possible war against Hussein's regime, President Bush alluded to the possibility that if war broke out, Iraq might attack other nations in the region, including Israel - perhaps with chemical or biological weapons.
NEWS
By Mark Matthews and Mark Matthews,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | April 2, 2002
WASHINGTON - The escalation of the Israeli-Palestinian conflict is damaging the fragile relations that the United States and Israel have developed with moderate Arab states, eroding the progress made in the decade since the Persian Gulf war. It has also made it harder for the Bush administration to isolate Iraq and gain Arab support for its drive to topple the government of President Saddam Hussein. Leaders in Jordan and Egypt, the only Arab states to have made peace with Israel, face growing anti-Israel sentiment that is increasingly directed against the United States as well.
TOPIC
By G. Jefferson Price III and G. Jefferson Price III,PERSPECTIVE EDITOR | March 3, 2002
CAIRO, Egypt - When Hosni Mubarak, the president of Egypt, comes to Washington this week, he will undoubtedly deliver the same message chanted like a mantra by Egyptian officials in this capital city - the United States' blind support of Israel is dangerously unhelpful in the abiding war with the Palestinians; putting Iraq in the "axis of evil" and threatening an attack on Saddam Hussein only make matters worse in the Middle East. The Egyptian media are saturated with reports on the daily bloodshed in Israel and the Israeli-occupied territories that describe Palestinian suicide attackers as "martyrs" and their acts as "sacrifices."
NEWS
By Mark Matthews and Mark Matthews,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | February 7, 2002
WASHINGTON - Capitalizing on his adversary's missteps, Israel's hard-line prime minister, Ariel Sharon, has forged a relationship with the United States that rivals the one enjoyed by his dovish predecessor, Ehud Barak. When he meets this afternoon for the fourth time with President Bush - who has refused to even shake hands with Palestinian leader Yasser Arafat - Sharon will be talking with a man who, to a large extent, shares his view of the threats facing Israel and American interests in the Middle East.
NEWS
By Mark Matthews and Mark Matthews,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | April 2, 2002
WASHINGTON - The escalation of the Israeli-Palestinian conflict is damaging the fragile relations that the United States and Israel have developed with moderate Arab states, eroding the progress made in the decade since the Persian Gulf war. It has also made it harder for the Bush administration to isolate Iraq and gain Arab support for its drive to topple the government of President Saddam Hussein. Leaders in Jordan and Egypt, the only Arab states to have made peace with Israel, face growing anti-Israel sentiment that is increasingly directed against the United States as well.
NEWS
August 31, 2004
THE DENIALS are loud and resounding. The American Israel Public Affairs Committee called allegations that the American Jewish lobby received secret information about U.S. policy on Iran from a Pentagon analyst, and passed it onto Israel, "baseless and false." The government of Israel was just as emphatic about the charge: "false and outrageous." The reported FBI investigation touched a nerve. It raised the specter of divided loyalties, Israel spying on its chief ally and benefactor, mudslinging at a pro-Israel president on the eve of his renomination.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | September 4, 2001
DURBAN, South Africa -- The United States and Israel walked out of the United Nations meeting on racism last night, denouncing a condemnation of Israel in a proposed conference declaration and lamenting that a gathering intended to celebrate tolerance and diversity had degenerated into one torn by hate. Last night, South Africa convened emergency meetings to redraft the declaration and program of action in the hope of averting other walkouts, and a spokesman for the European Union delegation, which had also raised concerns, said its diplomats would participate in those efforts.
NEWS
By Jim Anderson | June 27, 2000
WASHINGTON -- Once you know the code, it's easy to tell when policies fail at the State Department. Their names are "disappeared" just as efficiently as political suspects were eliminated in Latin American dictatorships. Policy names that are no longer useful are exterminated, like the Kremlin used to expunge names and faces from photographs when a member of the Politburo fell out of Stalin's favor. The latest example of this semantic cleansing at the State Department is "rogue," as in "rogue states."
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