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NEWS
January 24, 2014
As evidence of the Palestinians' reluctance to make peace with Israel, letter writer Michael Langbaum says that they "cannot even agree to recognize Israel as a Jewish state" ("Sharon's strategy didn't work," Jan. 20). But why should Palestinians recognize Israel as a Jewish state when less than 80 percent of Israel's population is of Jewish heritage? A far greater proportion of Americans have Christian antecedents. Is Mr. Langbaum willing, for that reason, to recognize that the U.S. is a "Christian" nation?
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NEWS
January 24, 2014
As evidence of the Palestinians' reluctance to make peace with Israel, letter writer Michael Langbaum says that they "cannot even agree to recognize Israel as a Jewish state" ("Sharon's strategy didn't work," Jan. 20). But why should Palestinians recognize Israel as a Jewish state when less than 80 percent of Israel's population is of Jewish heritage? A far greater proportion of Americans have Christian antecedents. Is Mr. Langbaum willing, for that reason, to recognize that the U.S. is a "Christian" nation?
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NEWS
April 6, 1992
More than three-fourths of callers to SUNDIAL are against statehood for the District of Columbia. The tally is 477 against, 148 in favor (76 percent vs. 23 percent) out of 625 callers.
TRAVEL
By Karen Nitkin
For The Baltimore Sun
| June 7, 2013
West Virginia, the only state created during the Civil War, was born 150 years ago, on June 20, 1863, when the state of Virginia was split in two to add a Union state. These days, West Virginia is known for its resorts and outdoor recreation. With historic downtowns that still boast plenty of architecture from pre-statehood days, the past seems close in West Virginia. This year, but particularly in June, the state is marking its big birthday with music, parades, reenactments, and other special events.
NEWS
By James J. Kilpatrick | September 18, 1990
Washington. LET IT BE stated for the record, bluntly and without qualification: Statehood for Puerto Rico is an intolerable proposition. Pending bills that would pave the way to that prospect should be defeated out of hand.The American press regrettably has paid little attention to the Puerto Rican issue. The situation is heating up. Two Senate committees have completed work on a bill (S. 712) that would speed the path to statehood. A subcommittee in the House has reported its bill (H.R. 4765)
NEWS
By Marianne Means | August 11, 1997
WASHINGTON -- Into the volatile political racial wars, Congress is now preparing to throw another complication -- statehood for Spanish-speaking Puerto Rico.The island has been an American commonwealth for nearly 100 years, locked in an anachronistic half-baked status that no longer makes much sense either in Washington or San Juan. Denying the territory full rights has kept it in dependent second-class limbo for too long.But the politics of elevating Puerto Rico into full participation in the union are murky, messy and even a bit mean.
NEWS
By David Abel | December 13, 1998
SAN JUAN - A hundred years after the United States seized this small, strategically important gateway to the Caribbean, more than 2 million voters here will go to the polls today for the third time to seek an end to their lingering national limbo.For decades, this former Spanish colony has considered becoming the 51st state, but voters intent on adding a star to the U.S. flag have been unable to edge out those who preferred retaining their status as a U.S. "commonwealth" - a sort of halfway house of Americanness devised in 1952.
NEWS
December 11, 1998
SINCE Congress would not hold a plebiscite of Puerto Rican voters on the island's status, Gov. Pedro Rossello is. The referendum Sunday will not be binding, but Congress will be unable to ignore it.The vote will not close debate on whether Puerto Rico should retain its unique commonwealth status, achieve independence, associate with the United States on a new basis or gain statehood. If the vote is for statehood, as seems possible, it will open that debate on the mainland. And if Puerto Ricans choose statehood, they would deserve sympathetic consideration.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | August 5, 1994
WASHINGTON -- Proponents of statehood for the District of Columbia got a rare Senate hearing yesterday but were frustrated that the focus was on giving more representation to the city's residents rather than on creation of a 51st state.Eager as supporters of statehood were to make their case that the district should become the new state of New Columbia, with two senators and a member of the House, they criticized the scope of the hearings for diluting their cause with ideas they deemed impractical, unfair and undemocratic.
NEWS
By John B. O'Donnell and John B. O'Donnell,Washington Bureau | November 23, 1993
WASHINGTON -- Out of 175 Republicans in the House of Representatives, only one voted Sunday for statehood for the District of Columbia: Maryland's Wayne T. Gilchrest.The Eastern Shore congressman described his vote for D.C. statehood as a "symbolic . . . vote in principle for representative democracy."But his support was a vivid reminder that 47-year-old Mr. Gilchrest, now in his third year on Capitol Hill, is a GOP maverick and a man who marches to the beat of his own drummer.He muses occasionally that he "wouldn't miss this a bit" if he found himself out of Congress.
NEWS
October 4, 2011
I disagree with Ariel Ilan Roth's op-ed "U.S. is Wrong on Palestine" (Sept. 21). I will make a purely legal argument why the U.S. should veto Palestine's unilateral attempt for statehood in the United Nations. The following information is from the European Coalition for Israel's research document titled "Foundations of the International Legal Rights of the Jewish People and the State of Israel" and video documentary, which includes commentary from Dore Gold, Howard Grief, and Jacques Gauthier.
NEWS
By Ariel Ilan Roth | September 21, 2011
This week, the Palestinians will petition the U.N. Security Council for admission as a full member state. Admitting Palestine would be a nightmare for Israel and a serious problem for the United States. Nonetheless, President Barack Obama made the wrong decision in declaring Wednesday that the U.S. will oppose the Palestinians' bid for statehood. Admitting Palestine as a full member state of the U.N. threatens Israel because it means that Israel's military forces stationed over the "Green Line" that separates the two entities will be an army occupying an internationally recognized, sovereign state.
NEWS
September 19, 2011
Israel and the Palestinians are on a collision course this week, as the government of Palestinian Authority leader Mahmoud Abbas prepares to unilaterally seek United Nations recognition of an independent Palestinian state. If Mr. Abbas goes through with his plan, it would force the U.S. to use its veto on the Security Council to block the proposal, which it has promised to do - but which would also leave it in a far weaker position to influence events in the region. U.S. officials are desperately hoping to avoid such an outcome, but at this point the best they may be able to do is limit the damage.
NEWS
June 3, 2011
Gerald Otten and others appear to have forgotten the history of the Middle East ("The United Nations created a Jewish state; it can also create a Palestinian one," May 31). The United Nations did act on Palestinian statehood in 1947; two states were created by the declaration. However, the so-called Palestinians rejected their statehood by attacking the Jewish state alongside the surrounding Arab states, and afterward by choosing to live on UN handouts in refugee camps instead of creating their own state in the territories they possessed.
NEWS
By Laura King and Hossam Hamalawy and Laura King and Hossam Hamalawy,LOS ANGELES TIMES | November 29, 2004
CAIRO, Egypt - Mahmoud Abbas, the leading candidate for the presidency of the Palestinian Authority, said yesterday that Palestinians want to begin negotiating terms of final statehood with Israel as soon as possible and hope to reach an accord by the end of next year. Abbas, who is considered a moderate, told reporters after meeting with Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak in Cairo that Palestinians would not accept a temporary solution. "Even a state with interim borders is a waste of time," he said.
NEWS
By Mark Matthews and Mark Matthews,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | November 13, 2004
WASHINGTON - President Bush promised yesterday to help Palestinians achieve statehood and secure peace with Israel, but said they would have to make the first moves by building democracy, undertaking reforms and fighting terrorism. In his first extended comments on the Middle East since the death of Yasser Arafat, Bush laid out steps that would have to occur before he would press Israelis and Palestinians to negotiate a final settlement ending their half-century-old conflict. He made clear that pursuing an international peace plan should follow Israel's planned withdrawal of troops and settlers from the Gaza Strip and part of the West Bank, which is not due to get under way until next summer or fall.
NEWS
By Tom Bowman and Tom Bowman,Washington Bureau | November 14, 1992
WASHINGTON -- Faced with a Democratic White House that favors statehood for the District of Columbia, Republican lawmakers are ready with an alternative: Return the bulk of the nation's capital to Maryland."
NEWS
By KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | December 14, 1998
SAN JUAN, Puerto Rico -- In a cautious vote favoring the preservation of Puerto Rican heritage and protesting the wording on the ballot, Puerto Ricans voted yesterday against the option of becoming a state for the third time since the island became a commonwealth.As millions of paper ballots were counted by hand in schools across Puerto Rico, preliminary tallies indicated that the island's residents had chosen "none of the above" over statehood. With 100 percent of the vote counted, "none of the above" led over statehood by 50 to 47 percent.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | July 25, 2004
SAN JUAN, Puerto Rico - For political theatrics, you could not get much noisier and nastier than the governor's race in Puerto Rico. The juicy battle has Pedro Rossello, the charismatic but corruption-tainted former governor who wants his old job back, trading insults, charges and counter-charges with his successor, Sila M. Calderon. They are doing everything but hurling dishware at each other. Yet Calderon, the incumbent, is not a candidate - she is the first Puerto Rico governor in decades to forgo a re-election bid. She announced last year that she would not seek a second term, after Rossello, who wants Puerto Rico to become the 51st state, resurfaced.
NEWS
By Uli Schmetzer and Uli Schmetzer,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | August 11, 2003
JERUSALEM - The conflict between Israel and Hezbollah guerrillas in southern Lebanon flared anew yesterday after shells fired by guerrillas killed an Israeli teen-ager and wounded four in the border town of Shlomi. The shelling sparked an attack by Israeli warplanes on suspected Hezbollah positions in southern Lebanon. Also yesterday, Israeli Prime Minister Ariel Sharon told his Cabinet that the U.S.-backed plan for Palestinian statehood would not move ahead until the Palestinians carry out their pledge to dismantle militant groups.
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