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By Gadi Dechter and Gadi Dechter,Sun reporter | February 17, 2007
Gov. Martin O'Malley nominated seven people yesterday -- some new faces, some holdovers from previous Democratic administrations -- to the 17-member board that sets tuition, approves policy and hires presidents at 11 Maryland public university campuses. The governor's choices to serve on the state university system's Board of Regents include a former University of Maryland basketball star, the head of one of Baltimore's oldest law firms and a major donor to former Republican Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr. O'Malley selected C. Thomas McMillen, a former congressman, Rhodes scholar and University of Maryland basketball star, to take the seat vacated by Ehrlich fundraiser Richard E. Hug. McMillen has served on the independent Knight Commission, which promotes reform in collegiate athletics.
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NEWS
By Carrie Wells | May 30, 2014
Amid a series of changes to federal laws regarding how universities handle sexual assaults and sexual misconduct, the University System of Maryland is in the process of updating its two-decade-old policies on the matter. The Board of Regents of the university system, which includes 11 of the state's public four-year universities, is set to discuss the proposed revisions at a committee meeting Tuesday. The proposal is still under discussion with various stakeholders, including college presidents and their legal counsel, and a final draft will be presented to the full board in late June.
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NEWS
By Dan Berger | November 5, 2001
House and Senate are getting ideological over airport security. How 'bout a little pragmatism on this one, gang? Dr. Glendening has all the credentials to become head of a state university system anywhere but Maryland. The good thing about recession is you can refinance the unpaid mortgage at lower rates if they don't foreclose first. The state comptroller is a grumpy old man. He used to be a grumpy young man.
NEWS
By Carrie Wells, The Baltimore Sun | March 30, 2014
Theo Jones is set to graduate from Sojourner-Douglass College with a nursing degree in November, but instead of celebrating as he nears the finish line, he's left wondering if he should transfer to another school. Sojourner-Douglass was ordered this month by its accrediting body to "show cause" or prove why it should not lose its accreditation, and Jones is one of the many students who are deeply worried about their futures. Jones said he's made inquiries to five potential employers in recent weeks, and all have asked him about the school's accreditation status.
NEWS
By Childs Walker, The Baltimore Sun | December 22, 2010
The former dean of the University of Maryland School of Law has agreed to return more than $300,000 of a $350,000 bonus questioned in a state legislative audit earlier this year, the attorney general's office announced Wednesday. The legislative audit, released in February, revealed that former dean Karen Rothenberg received $410,000 in "questionable" payments between fiscal 2007 and fiscal 2009. The audit embarrassed the state university system and hastened the retirement of Rothenberg's former boss, University of Maryland, Baltimore President David Ramsay.
NEWS
January 24, 2011
At what point should not complying with our immigration laws have consequences ( "College bound, but undocumented," Jan. 24)? Assuming that the state university system has a quota for in-state applicants in order to meet budgetary expectations, granting in-state tuition to the children of illegal immigrants puts the children of legal residents of Maryland at a disadvantage. Children of illegal immigrants are not being denied a college education by if the state does not grant them in-state tuition.
NEWS
April 10, 2002
WHEN MARK L. Perkins suddenly resigned as Towson University's president this week, he characterized his short tenure there as "the grandest nine months of my professional life." Would that Maryland's second-largest public university could claim the same. Mr. Perkins, who left under threat of firing by the state university system's regents, was brought in to press the flesh and actively market Towson in Annapolis, within the state university system and to potential private donors. He certainly exuded a salesman's air, but he accomplished quite the opposite.
NEWS
By Julie Scharper, The Baltimore Sun | September 25, 2012
Maryland's two largest public research universities launched a joint public health program Tuesday, the first of a series of planned collaborations designed to break down barriers between the two campuses. Officials say the joint program will enable students to draw upon the University of Maryland, College Park's expertise in subjects such as biostatistics and the social sciences while benefiting from opportunities for clinical research at the University of Maryland School of Medicine in Baltimore.
NEWS
By Alec MacGillis and Alec MacGillis,SUN STAFF | March 20, 2002
The state university system's Board of Regents has offered its chancellorship to William E. Kirwan, who left the presidency of the University of Maryland, College Park four years ago partly out of frustration with the very system he is being asked to lead. Kirwan, president of Ohio State University, will not decide whether to take the post until after a commencement in Columbus on Friday, Ohio State spokesman Lee Tashjian said yesterday. Kirwan, who for months disavowed any interest in the Maryland job, expects to weigh the offer while at his family's vacation home at Deep Creek Lake during Ohio State's spring break next week.
NEWS
By Stephen Kiehl and Stephen Kiehl,stephen.kiehl@baltsun.com | April 7, 2009
COLLEGE PARK - More than 100 students cheered swashbuckling and sex-crazed pirates in a pornographic film that screened at the University of Maryland on Monday night - a film that, at various points in the past week, state lawmakers and the university tried to suppress. University administrators, who canceled a planned showing of Pirates II: Stagnetti's Revenge last week after lawmakers threatened to withhold funding, reversed their position Monday and allowed the screening as long as it included an educational component.
NEWS
By Carrie Wells, The Baltimore Sun | March 19, 2014
Over objections about the fairness of the process, the state Board of Public Works approved a land deal Wednesday that would allow a developer to build a luxury hotel and conference center at the University of Maryland, College Park. The university envisions a $115 million hotel to attract Big 10 conference attendees for a 3-acre tract across Route 1 from the main gates of campus, a long-held goal after other plans for that area failed. The university selected developer David Hillman of Southern Management Corp., which manages numerous apartment complexes in Baltimore and the Washington area.
NEWS
By Julie Scharper, The Baltimore Sun | September 25, 2012
Maryland's two largest public research universities launched a joint public health program Tuesday, the first of a series of planned collaborations designed to break down barriers between the two campuses. Officials say the joint program will enable students to draw upon the University of Maryland, College Park's expertise in subjects such as biostatistics and the social sciences while benefiting from opportunities for clinical research at the University of Maryland School of Medicine in Baltimore.
NEWS
January 24, 2011
At what point should not complying with our immigration laws have consequences ( "College bound, but undocumented," Jan. 24)? Assuming that the state university system has a quota for in-state applicants in order to meet budgetary expectations, granting in-state tuition to the children of illegal immigrants puts the children of legal residents of Maryland at a disadvantage. Children of illegal immigrants are not being denied a college education by if the state does not grant them in-state tuition.
NEWS
By Childs Walker, The Baltimore Sun | December 22, 2010
The former dean of the University of Maryland School of Law has agreed to return more than $300,000 of a $350,000 bonus questioned in a state legislative audit earlier this year, the attorney general's office announced Wednesday. The legislative audit, released in February, revealed that former dean Karen Rothenberg received $410,000 in "questionable" payments between fiscal 2007 and fiscal 2009. The audit embarrassed the state university system and hastened the retirement of Rothenberg's former boss, University of Maryland, Baltimore President David Ramsay.
NEWS
By Childs Walker | childs.walker@baltsun.com | December 5, 2009
Students applying to the state university system will have to have four math courses and will be required to take math their last year in high school under new admissions requirements passed Friday by regents. The requirements, which will take effect for those starting ninth grade in 2011, passed unanimously after a spirited debate in which several regents and university presidents questioned whether the standards would be the best fit for all students. Skeptics expressed particular concern about students who reach a high level of math early in high school and want to try other subjects as seniors.
NEWS
By Stephen Kiehl and Stephen Kiehl,stephen.kiehl@baltsun.com | April 7, 2009
COLLEGE PARK - More than 100 students cheered swashbuckling and sex-crazed pirates in a pornographic film that screened at the University of Maryland on Monday night - a film that, at various points in the past week, state lawmakers and the university tried to suppress. University administrators, who canceled a planned showing of Pirates II: Stagnetti's Revenge last week after lawmakers threatened to withhold funding, reversed their position Monday and allowed the screening as long as it included an educational component.
NEWS
By Carrie Wells, The Baltimore Sun | March 19, 2014
Over objections about the fairness of the process, the state Board of Public Works approved a land deal Wednesday that would allow a developer to build a luxury hotel and conference center at the University of Maryland, College Park. The university envisions a $115 million hotel to attract Big 10 conference attendees for a 3-acre tract across Route 1 from the main gates of campus, a long-held goal after other plans for that area failed. The university selected developer David Hillman of Southern Management Corp., which manages numerous apartment complexes in Baltimore and the Washington area.
NEWS
By Patricia Meisol CbB | October 15, 1991
Deans and department heads at the University of Maryland at College Park were to notify 67 employees this morning that they would lose their jobs because of budget cuts brought on by a loss of state funds.The layoffs at the state's main public research campus, affecting 30 departments, are unprecedented in the university's 135-year history, officials said.They represent only about one-fourth of the pink slips that could be delivered on campus beginning July 1 if the economic picture does not change.
NEWS
By Stephen Kiehl and Stephen Kiehl,stephen.kiehl@baltsun.com | December 13, 2008
Employees of the state university system will be furloughed up to five days under a plan approved yesterday by the Maryland Board of Regents that would save $16 million in salary costs. Regents said the furloughs, which will come between January and June, were preferable to laying off any of the system's 22,500 full-time employees. The furloughs, the system's first since 1992, were ordered by the governor as the state tries to balance its budget in the face of declining revenues and a global economic crisis.
NEWS
By Stephen Kiehl and Stephen Kiehl,Sun Reporter | August 19, 2008
Top university officials in Maryland - including the chancellor of the state university system and the president of the Johns Hopkins University - say the current drinking age of 21 "is not working" and has led to dangerous binges in which students have harmed themselves and others. Six college and university presidents in Maryland are among more than 100 nationwide who have signed a statement calling for a public debate on rethinking the drinking age. It is a rare joint effort by the leaders of religious, liberal arts and large research universities to curb what they see as the top student-life issue on their campuses.
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