Advertisement
HomeCollectionsState Transportation
IN THE NEWS

State Transportation

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
By Doug Birch John W. Frece of The Sun's Annapolis Bureau contributed to this article | March 8, 1991
State transportation officials, who are lobbying for higher gasoline taxes by pleading poverty, have still managed to find $64,979 to hire a former Baltimore highways official who ran one of the governor's political action committees.Frank Babusci, 42, who recently won a disability pension from the city, said yesterday he begins work Monday at Department of Transportation headquarters at the Baltimore-Washington International Airport as a contract employee "with a vast [array] of duties."Stephen G. Zentz, deputy secretary of transportation, said Mr. Babusci's new job will combine responsibility for some future programs, including a consumer quality-control effort, with a vacant post within the division of operating services.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | March 28, 2014
James Joseph O'Donnell, a former Maryland transportation secretary and World War II lieutenant commander, died of respiratory failure Tuesday at Stella Maris Hospice in Timonium. The former Cedarcroft resident was 95. "Jim got things done in a quiet way. He was a big help for me and was a good public servant," said former Gov. Harry R. Hughes, who lives in Denton. "He was very competent and was at all times a real gentleman. " Born in Baltimore and raised on Randall Street in South Baltimore, he attended the Cathedral School and was a 1936 graduate of Loyola High School.
Advertisement
NEWS
By Michael Dresser and Michael Dresser,SUN STAFF | September 23, 2004
State Transportation Secretary Robert L. Flanagan criticized Baltimore's economic development efforts yesterday, saying that the city has failed to capitalize on opportunities to revitalize the neighborhood around Penn Station. His remarks -- which some interpreted as a slap at Mayor Martin O'Malley by a high-ranking Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr. administration official -- came at a regional transportation summit. Flanagan warned that the city would have to do a better job to compete for scarce federal transit dollars.
NEWS
By Joe Burris, The Baltimore Sun | September 23, 2013
Local traffic moved without unscheduled road closures at 9:15 a.m. on Monday as local and state transportation departments reported no incidents. The Maryland Transit Administration reported minor MARC train delays at 9:15 a.m.
NEWS
By Nick Madigan and Nick Madigan,nick.madigan@baltsun.com | November 11, 2008
Wish list in hand, Baltimore County Executive James T. Smith Jr. asked state transportation officials yesterday for millions of dollars to pay for improvements to roads, bridges and train stations, but a tough economy means he will not get everything he wants. In a meeting in Towson, Smith told John D. Porcari, Maryland's secretary of transportation, that with an expected influx of residents under the military's Base Realignment and Closure process, "it is imperative that we have the appropriate infrastructure to accommodate the new residents and jobs that we anticipate adding to this area."
NEWS
By Hanah Cho and Hanah Cho,SUN STAFF | October 12, 2003
Stressing the need to find money to fix Maryland's ailing highways, state Transportation Secretary Robert L. Flanagan outlined Friday the roadway projects in Harford County that will remain stalled until the state can find additional funding sources. Among the projects for which construction money has not been earmarked is the often-discussed Perryman access road from Route 159 to U.S. 40 and reconstructing the Interstate 95 and Route 24 interchange. The meeting in Bel Air was the transportation secretary's 10th stop on a tour across Maryland to address the state's transportation needs as officials outlined unfunded projects until 2010 that total $10.5 billion.
NEWS
By Joe Burris, The Baltimore Sun | September 23, 2013
Local traffic moved without unscheduled road closures at 9:15 a.m. on Monday as local and state transportation departments reported no incidents. The Maryland Transit Administration reported minor MARC train delays at 9:15 a.m.
NEWS
July 7, 1996
George William Frick Jr., 74, owned Broadway FoodsGeorge William "Bill" Frick Jr., former owner of Broadway Foods Inc., died Friday of cancer at Greater Baltimore Medical Center in Towson. He was 74.Born on 33rd Street in Baltimore, Mr. Frick graduated from City College in 1937 and Lafayette College in Easton, Pa., in 1942.During World War II, he was stationed at an Army base in Anchorage, Alaska, where he worked as a supply sergeant from 1942 to 1945. Upon discharge, he returned home to work at the then-Broadway Meat Co., which had been in his family since 1890.
NEWS
By David Nitkin and David Nitkin,SUN STAFF | July 2, 2005
Marsha J. Kaiser, a high-ranking state Transportation Department manager who was criticized in an audit for overseeing projects given to her husband's company, has resigned from her state position, officials announced yesterday. State Transportation Secretary Robert L. Flanagan gave no reason for Kaiser's departure after seven years as director of planning and capital programs. "The impact Marsha has had on transportation in Maryland can be felt in every corner of the state. Marsha is a leader and a problem-solver," Flanagan said in a statement.
NEWS
July 10, 1992
Life is hard for Anne Arundel residents who live in Baltimore-Washington International Airport's "noise zone." The Maryland Aviation Administration only made it harder by spending three years trying to deny them their right to complain.This week, at long last, a state transportation review board began considering the BWI neighbors' appeal of the 1988 noise control plan, which included some major, unpopular changes. The zone -- the area where noise from jets may exceed 65 decibels -- was enlarged from 8,600 to 12,000 acres.
BUSINESS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | August 29, 2013
Stefanie Trop decided to live in Butchers Hill, a 7-minute walk from the Johns Hopkins medical campus, because all her friends live and work in the city and she didn't want to drive to school. "It's not always the most pleasant walk; it's not very scenic and you can't pick any route you want to," she said. "But it's quick and easy. " Trop is one of a growing number of young professionals and other commuters in Maryland and around the country who are spending less time behind the wheel, according to a study released Thursday by the U.S. PIRG Education Fund.
NEWS
July 10, 2013
Gov. Martin O'Malley's announcement of $650 million for transportation projects in the Washington suburbs is welcome news for some Marylanders, but it also highlights serious concerns about how new gas tax money is allocated ("O'Malley announces nearly $650M for county transportation improvements," July 9). Every major state transportation project since the mid-1990s has gone to the Washington region. Just the four largest projects in that period - the Inter-County Connector, the Woodrow Wilson Bridge and completion of the Metro system's Blue and Green lines - total over $5 billion.
NEWS
By Tricia Bishop, The Baltimore Sun | June 26, 2013
A legislative audit released Wednesday found that Towson University was slow to act when students repeatedly wrote bad tuition checks and that a $4.3 million agreement with the Maryland Department of Transportation circumvented Maryland procurement rules. The audit states that 78 students submitted two or more bad tuition checks worth $650,000 over two or more semesters. If the university had placed the proper holds on their accounts, the repeat offenses couldn't have occurred. The school promised to take "timely and appropriate action against students who are in arrears.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | May 29, 2013
Gov. Martin O'Malley will turn to a longtime political ally, former Baltimore County Executive James T. Smith, to lead the Maryland Department of Transportation as it begins a new era of stepped-up construction, administration officials confirmed Tuesday. O'Malley is expected to announce the appointment of Smith, 71, on Wednesday. His selection ends a search that has continued for more than a year - since former Transportation Secretary Beverly Swaim-Staley announced her departure last spring.
BUSINESS
By Candus Thomson, The Baltimore Sun | June 30, 2012
After 35 years in state and local government, Beverley Swaim-Staley announced in April that she would step down as Maryland's secretary of transportation, effective July 1. Appointed by Gov. Martin O'Malley in September 2009, Swaim-Staley was the first woman to head MDOT, which has a $3.8 billion budget and more than 9,000 employees. She previously served as deputy transportation secretary, perhaps most memorably in 2001, when she supervised Baltimore/Washington International Thurgood Marshall Airport in the aftermath of the 9/11 terrorist attacks.
NEWS
September 22, 2011
One can scarcely blame Gov. Martin O'Malley for wanting to do something about jobs. Maryland's unemployment rate, while still well below the national average, is high and showing little sign of improvement despite the boost from the federal military base realignment program that has sent thousands of defense-related jobs to the state in recent years. Given that Mr. O'Malley supports President Barack Obama's jobs bill and, as chairman of the Democratic Governors Association, also harbors his own aspiration for the national political stage, his announcement Wednesday that he will offer his own jobs bill at a special session next month comes as no surprise.
BUSINESS
By Suzanne Wooton and Suzanne Wooton,Staff Writer | July 1, 1993
ANNAPOLIS -- The on-again-off-again plans to expand the international terminal at Baltimore-Washington International Airport inched forward yesterday as state officials approved a $6.2 million contract for final design of the project.In February, state transportation officials, citing the anticipated loss of a major European carrier at BWI and the slump in the airline industry, had postponed the long-awaited expansion.But yesterday they said that an upswing in BWI passengers this year and the recent alliance between British Airways and USAir, the dominant carrier at BWI, had prompted the decision to move ahead with the $130 million project.
NEWS
April 23, 2003
IN THE FEW years since neighborhood buses began running in the Hampden and Mondawmin areas, these so-called shuttle bugs have been hailed as a popular convenience. The frequent low-cost shuttles connect with light rail and subway stops, making better use of these substantial investments and helping the state reach its goal of doubling statewide mass transit ridership from 2000 to 2020. But these days, Maryland is hardly on track toward meeting that ridership goal. And the shuttles? Plans for similar services in South Baltimore, Towson and Fells Point were put on hold last fall, and the state last week said the Hampden and Mondawmin shuttles would run less frequently and their fare would double to $1 a ride.
NEWS
June 2, 2011
For nearly as long as there has been motorized travel, there have been shutterbugs taking pictures of trains, planes, automobiles and the like. And surely no form of transportation is more romanticized — or attracts a more dedicated fan base — than rail travel. So how is it that twice this year tourists taking pictures of light rail have been detained and hassled by Maryland Transit Administration police for the purported crime of photography? Worse yet, in both instances the victims were repeatedly told that it was illegal to take pictures of light rail trains while standing on public property.
NEWS
By Larry Carson, The Baltimore Sun | May 12, 2011
Howard County's most liberal and conservative state legislators agree that gasoline taxes shouldn't go up while prices are so high, but that leaves unanswered questions about how to pay for transportation projects. Gov. Martin O'Malley is trying to revive discussion of the state's depleted transportation fund in anticipation of the issue's coming up in the fall special General Assembly session intended to redraw congressional district lines. If Howard's delegation is any measure, it will be tough to pass anything.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.