Advertisement
HomeCollectionsState Taxes
IN THE NEWS

State Taxes

NEWS
Dan Rodricks | October 15, 2012
Under the Maryland Dream Act, students who want to attend our community colleges or public universities at the in-state tuition rate must have attended a Maryland high school for at least three years. They must prove that their families filed state income tax returns during that time, and they or their families must file returns each year that the student attends college. Because the Dream Act was written for illegal immigrants, you might be wondering how this can be. Since when do such people pay income taxes?
Advertisement
NEWS
By John Leopold | June 14, 2012
When the General Assembly considered video lottery facility legislation in the special session of 2007, a defined area of Anne Arundel County was included as one of five designated sites. In fact, it was included as the site allocated the greatest number of slot machines. This meant it was the site that would generate the greatest revenue for the state education trust fund. Anne Arundel County was willing to accommodate the largest site and respond to the constitutional provision requiring compliance with local zoning laws.
NEWS
June 3, 2012
This Wednesday's planned opening of the half-billion-dollar Maryland Live! Casino at Arundel Mills marks a red-letter day in Maryland gaming history. The scale of the enormous, 330,000-square-foot facility is stunning: It will eventually house 4,750 slot machines (far more than any other Maryland facility) in addition to restaurants and entertainment. No doubt the opening will be a particularly satisfying moment for developer David Cordish and others at the Cordish Cos.who overcame a considerable number of obstacles, not least a 2010 voter referendum.
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella, The Baltimore Sun | February 14, 2012
Eight Maryland businesses approved for $34 million in tax credits for job creation from 2007 to 2010 failed to document their project or startup costs, a legislative audit of the state's economic development agency has found. An audit of the Maryland Department of Business and Economic Development released Tuesday also found that the agency had failed to recover a $250,000 investment in a technology company that moved out of state less than a year after getting a loan to create jobs in Maryland.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | February 8, 2012
Comptroller Peter Franchot said Wednesday that he planned to make the process of filing income taxes in Maryland "virtually paperless" by 2014. Franchot said at a meeting of the Board of Public Works, on which he sits, that 70 percent of Maryland taxpayers were expected to files returns electronically this year – double the rate of five years ago. He said electronic filing saved the state $2 per return and reduced paper waste by 26 million pages...
NEWS
By Sam Whitehorn | February 1, 2012
Got a problem? There's an app for that! Unfortunately, solving Maryland's budget deficit isn't that easy. In fact, one proposal set forth this week by Gov.Martin O'Malleyto tax digital goods could impact states and consumers well beyond Maryland's borders. While Maryland has the right to address the taxation of goods, Congress must fix the potential for duplicative state taxation first. Over the last 10 years, the sale of digital goods has grown at lightning speed. According to the CTIA (a trade group representing the wireless telecommunications industry)
BUSINESS
Eileen Ambrose | January 30, 2012
While the legislators battle it out over taxes in Annapolis, Marylanders will get a brief respite. From Feb. 18 through the 20 th , Marylanders buying certain Energy Star products can avoid paying the 6 percent state sales tax. Items that qualify for the tax holiday include air conditioners, clothes dryers and washers, furnaces, refrigerators, programmable thermostats. For a full list, check out the comptroller's website . This three-day tax holiday on energy products takes place annually on the weekend of the third Monday in February.
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | January 16, 2012
Frustrated by Maryland's high rate of health disparities, state leaders are proposing a new attack - one more commonly associated with economic development. Gov. Martin O'Malley's 2012-2013 budget will include funding to create Health Enterprise Zones, where doctors and community groups in areas with large health disparities, such as Baltimore, could add medical and support services for minorities. Tax credits and other financial incentives would be available to spur interest. The plan is designed to save lives and healthcare dollars, according to Lt. Gov. Anthony G. Brown, who last summer formed a work group on disparities led by Dr. E. Albert Reece, dean of the University of Maryland School of Medicine.
NEWS
April 14, 2011
"Amazing, awesome, incredible" and "I am overjoyed" were among the responses I received to the news that the increase in the alcohol tax enacted this week by the General Assembly will help fund services for people with developmental disabilities. These responses came from families who have languished on the state's waiting list for essential supports for many years. We estimate that more than 500 children and adults with disabilities such as autism, cerebral palsy and Down Syndrome will finally receive the support they desperately need.
BUSINESS
By Gus G. Sentementes, The Baltimore Sun | July 11, 2010
Baltimore's biotechnology industry has made strides. Two biotech parks by the Johns Hopkins University and the University of Maryland now anchor the east and west sides of the city. A few dozen biotech startups have made their home here. But Baltimore's nascent biotech industry doesn't yet have a breakout company — a darling of venture capitalists and Wall Street that has grown past the risky and unprofitable startup phase to achieve a steady stream of revenue and products in the pipeline.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.