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State Taxes

NEWS
By Sam Whitehorn | February 1, 2012
Got a problem? There's an app for that! Unfortunately, solving Maryland's budget deficit isn't that easy. In fact, one proposal set forth this week by Gov.Martin O'Malleyto tax digital goods could impact states and consumers well beyond Maryland's borders. While Maryland has the right to address the taxation of goods, Congress must fix the potential for duplicative state taxation first. Over the last 10 years, the sale of digital goods has grown at lightning speed. According to the CTIA (a trade group representing the wireless telecommunications industry)
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BUSINESS
Eileen Ambrose | January 30, 2012
While the legislators battle it out over taxes in Annapolis, Marylanders will get a brief respite. From Feb. 18 through the 20 th , Marylanders buying certain Energy Star products can avoid paying the 6 percent state sales tax. Items that qualify for the tax holiday include air conditioners, clothes dryers and washers, furnaces, refrigerators, programmable thermostats. For a full list, check out the comptroller's website . This three-day tax holiday on energy products takes place annually on the weekend of the third Monday in February.
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | January 16, 2012
Frustrated by Maryland's high rate of health disparities, state leaders are proposing a new attack - one more commonly associated with economic development. Gov. Martin O'Malley's 2012-2013 budget will include funding to create Health Enterprise Zones, where doctors and community groups in areas with large health disparities, such as Baltimore, could add medical and support services for minorities. Tax credits and other financial incentives would be available to spur interest. The plan is designed to save lives and healthcare dollars, according to Lt. Gov. Anthony G. Brown, who last summer formed a work group on disparities led by Dr. E. Albert Reece, dean of the University of Maryland School of Medicine.
NEWS
April 14, 2011
"Amazing, awesome, incredible" and "I am overjoyed" were among the responses I received to the news that the increase in the alcohol tax enacted this week by the General Assembly will help fund services for people with developmental disabilities. These responses came from families who have languished on the state's waiting list for essential supports for many years. We estimate that more than 500 children and adults with disabilities such as autism, cerebral palsy and Down Syndrome will finally receive the support they desperately need.
BUSINESS
By Gus G. Sentementes, The Baltimore Sun | July 11, 2010
Baltimore's biotechnology industry has made strides. Two biotech parks by the Johns Hopkins University and the University of Maryland now anchor the east and west sides of the city. A few dozen biotech startups have made their home here. But Baltimore's nascent biotech industry doesn't yet have a breakout company — a darling of venture capitalists and Wall Street that has grown past the risky and unprofitable startup phase to achieve a steady stream of revenue and products in the pipeline.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | June 17, 2010
Gov. Martin O'Malley will designate 14 rail stations as the state's initial sites for mixed-use development connected with transit projects, making them eligible for state spending and tax incentives. The governor plans to announce the list of transit-oriented development projects, including seven in metropolitan Baltimore, receiving that legal authorization at a news conference today in Prince George's County. Most of the projects have been publicly discussed as potential sites for mixed-use development, but the governor's action will allow the state Department of Transportation to devote money and staff time to moving them forward, said Chris Patusky, the agency's real estate director.
NEWS
March 14, 2010
W hen the current fiscal year ends in June, Maryland's tax collections will likely have dropped 5.2 percent from the previous year, the worst showing on record. Personal income in 2009 is expected to show the lowest growth rate since 1954; unemployment is at its highest level since 1983 and is expected to get worse; and solid economic growth is not expected until 2012 at the least. Believe it or not, that counts as good news, at least in a relative sense. The figures released Wednesday by the Board of Revenue Estimates are about the same as they were in the group's last report, in December, and that one was largely unchanged from September.
NEWS
By Larry Carson | larry.carson@baltsun.com | March 9, 2010
The latest state income tax payments to local governments fell $61.8 million year over year, piling new fiscal woes atop budgets already reeling from state cuts, high snow removal costs and earlier revenue declines. The declines in payments from the state to county governments at the end of February put an added $29.4 million burden on Montgomery County, which was already facing a projected $761.5 million shortfall by June 30, according to the Maryland comptroller's office. Prince George's and Charles counties were alone among Maryland's 24 jurisdictions to receive more in the fourth quarter of 2009 than in 2008.
BUSINESS
January 23, 2010
AT&T customers in Maryland who connect to the Internet with smart phones are being taxed illegally, a class action lawsuit filed Friday alleges. The lawsuit, filed in U.S. District Court by a Baltimore law firm led by trial lawyer William H. Murphy Jr., says those Maryland customers have been improperly billed a 6 percent monthly state tax and a monthly local communications tax. The lawsuit is seeking refunds and contends that total damages could exceed tens of millions of dollars.
BUSINESS
By Eileen Ambrose and Eileen Ambrose,eileen.ambrose@baltsun.com | October 13, 2009
If you're behind on your state taxes, you have just about two weeks to come clean and avoid severe repercussions. Maryland's tax amnesty program, launched in September, expires Oct. 30. Under the amnesty, individuals and small businesses must pay back taxes, but they will only owe half the interest usually assessed and won't face civil penalties or criminal prosecution. And for the first time, delinquent taxpayers have the option of paying up under a plan that stretches payments out until the end of next year.
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