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NEWS
By John W. Frece and John W. Frece,Anapolis Bureau of The Sun | March 1, 1991
ANNAPOLIS -- Lt. Gov. Melvin A. Steinberg split with his boss, Gov. William Donald Schaefer, yesterday over what course the administration should recommend for its controversial Linowes commission tax restructuring proposal.Mr. Schaefer wants the bill passed this year. Mr. Steinberg said ++ he was convinced the measure needed to be studied by the General Assembly and subjected to public hearings this summer.As a result, Mr. Steinberg, who is in charge of the governor's legislative agenda, said he had decided not to testify at a joint legislative hearing today on the tax proposal legislation.
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BUSINESS
By Ross Hetrick and Ross Hetrick,Staff Writer | June 27, 1992
Employers will have to be more vigilant about where their employees live to determine the proper amount of local income taxes to withhold under new guidelines issued by the Maryland comptroller of the treasury.One of the major changes in withholding is the piggyback tax imposed by the counties and Baltimore. For the past three years, this rate had been 50 percent of the state income tax rate in all parts of Maryland except Worcester County, where it is 20 percent.But during its last session the General Assembly raised the ceiling from 50 percent to 60 percent.
NEWS
June 10, 2007
County needs help to deal with BRAC The good news about the national military base realignment is that we're getting thousands of new jobs at Aberdeen Proving Ground. The bad news is we're being stuck with the costs of providing infrastructure for tens of thousands of new people. Harford County is trying to shoulder these responsibilities but is being denied the tools needed to do the job. For example, Harford has already forward-funded schools just to keep up with current growth. The state government provides much less than is needed because of its own money issues, we're told.
BUSINESS
March 17, 1999
Members of the Maryland Association of Certified Public Accountants are answering readers' tax questions through April 15. See below for how to submit a question.I work in the District of Columbia, for the D.C. government, but I reside in Baltimore. For two pay periods my employer mistakely sent my state taxes to D.C. instead of to Maryland. What can I do about that and how do I report my income tax?Maryland and the District of Columbia have adopted a reciprocal agreement that allows your compensation to be taxed in the state of Maryland, even though it is earned in the District of Columbia.
BUSINESS
By David Conn and David Conn,Annapolis Bureau of The Sun | February 1, 1991
ANNAPOLIS -- The Maryland Retail Merchants Association became yesterday the latest business group to speak out on a controversial tax package that, among other things, would expand and raise the state sales tax.Not surprisingly, the group found no merit in that aspect of the package, named the Linowes report after its chairman, Montgomery County lawyer R. Robert Linowes. The report, which the Schaefer administration has decided to send to the General Assembly, would raise about $800 million in new taxes to help poorer jurisdictions around the state, as well as raise money for education and transportation.
NEWS
By R. ROBERT LINOWES | April 2, 1991
There is never a good time to talk about taxes. GivenMaryland's softened economy and the current state budget deficit, the prospect of new taxes is neither popular nor promising.Yet, a discussion about Maryland's tax system is very much in order. Our system is outmoded and outdated. Over time it has failed to keep pace with the changing nature of the state and the needs of all our citizens. It is not a fair system -- either in how it taxes, or in how the revenue is expended.The Commission on State Taxes and Tax Structure was created in 1987 for the express purpose of finding ways to change and improve Maryland's tax system.
NEWS
By Kerry O'Rourke and Kerry O'Rourke,Staff writer | December 16, 1990
WESTMINSTER - The plan calls for a tax increase that will affect even his wallet, but R. Robert Linowes, author of a state tax reform report, says it's the right thing to do."If the state is going to be economically sound, there's got to be money," he said. "There are no more free lunches. The bills are coming due."Linowes outlined the plan to members of the Carroll County Chamber of Commerce at a luncheon Thursday at Martin's Westminster."I assure you, I'm going to be hit as hard as anyone in this room," he said.
BUSINESS
By Eileen Ambrose and Eileen Ambrose,Sun Columnist | May 8, 2007
Frank of Reisterstown says one thing seems to be overlooked in the hoopla over TV game shows: taxes. "For example, in Deal or No Deal, the contestant is asked, `What would you do with $1,000,000?'" he writes in an e-mail. "In all these contests, taxes don't seem to be considered. Winners do have to pay taxes on their winnings, don't they?" You bet. Just ask Richard Hatch, the Survivor winner whose serving time in prison for tax evasion. As if no one was going to notice that a naked contestant won $1 million.
NEWS
By Saul Friedman and Saul Friedman,Newsday | October 15, 1992
WASHINGTON -- Texas billionaire Ross Perot, whose economic plan calls on the nation to participate in a "fair-share sacrifice," pays a smaller share of his income in taxes than most Americans and stands to pay even less under his proposal, according to a study of his holdings and to sources familiar with his finances.Precise figures are not available because Mr. Perot has refused to make his income-tax returns public or discuss his finances, and his office declined to return repeated calls.
BUSINESS
By Gady A. Epstein and Gady A. Epstein,SUN STAFF | April 15, 1999
So by now you may have figured out that the new Maryland tax form can be a pain in the neck. The one-page "short" sheet is gone, replaced by a longer, headache-inducing form with different rates and sets of exemptions for state and local taxes.Well, next year the short form is coming back. Legislators have to file taxes, too, and they have passed a bill getting rid of the extra work sheets and calculations.It may be too late for this year's tax day, but for next April taxpayers can count on a one-page form.
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