Advertisement
HomeCollectionsState Taxes
IN THE NEWS

State Taxes

BUSINESS
By Lyle Denniston and Lyle Denniston,Washington Bureau of The Sun Sun staff writer David Conn contributed to this article | December 13, 1994
WASHINGTON -- Maryland and most other states got final clearance from the Supreme Court yesterday to continue taxing income that shareholders receive when their mutual funds put money indirectly into federal government securities.In a unanimous decision, the court ruled that federal law does not bar states from taxing income earned from "repurchase agreements" that are entered into by mutual funds.That ruling overturned a decision by the Nebraska Supreme Court that had granted state-tax immunity to those kinds of mutual fund investments.
Advertisement
BUSINESS
By Ross Hetrick and Ross Hetrick,Staff Writer | June 27, 1992
Employers will have to be more vigilant about where their employees live to determine the proper amount of local income taxes to withhold under new guidelines issued by the Maryland comptroller of the treasury.One of the major changes in withholding is the piggyback tax imposed by the counties and Baltimore. For the past three years, this rate had been 50 percent of the state income tax rate in all parts of Maryland except Worcester County, where it is 20 percent.But during its last session the General Assembly raised the ceiling from 50 percent to 60 percent.
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins and Jamie Smith Hopkins,SUN STAFF | December 16, 2003
The U.S. Supreme Court yesterday strengthened Maryland's case for collecting millions of dollars from dozens - if not hundreds - of companies avoiding taxes by sending profits to Delaware. The high court refused to hear Crown Cork & Seal's appeal of a state court decision that found it liable for $1.4 million in state taxes. It was a second win for Maryland - last month the Supreme Court declined to consider an appeal from another business on the same issue. The timing couldn't be better for state Comptroller William Donald Schaefer, who recently offered 70 companies a penalty of 2 percent instead of the normal 25 percent if they pay up by Jan. 30. Those businesses have until the end of this month to decide whether to take the deal, and though some have contacted the state comptroller, officials wouldn't say if any have promised to send a check.
NEWS
By Greg Garland and Greg Garland,SUN STAFF | July 23, 2002
A company involved in the state's new $14 million "Smoking Stops Here" advertising campaign paid $4,300 in back state taxes yesterday as a step toward getting its corporate charter restored. However, it is uncertain whether Twenty-First Century Group Inc. will remain part of a team running the 17-month anti-smoking advertising campaign. Roger Gray, president and chief executive of GKV Communications, the prime contractor, said he is reviewing Twenty-First Century Group's role as a subcontractor.
NEWS
By John W. Frece and John W. Frece,Anapolis Bureau of The Sun | March 1, 1991
ANNAPOLIS -- Lt. Gov. Melvin A. Steinberg split with his boss, Gov. William Donald Schaefer, yesterday over what course the administration should recommend for its controversial Linowes commission tax restructuring proposal.Mr. Schaefer wants the bill passed this year. Mr. Steinberg said ++ he was convinced the measure needed to be studied by the General Assembly and subjected to public hearings this summer.As a result, Mr. Steinberg, who is in charge of the governor's legislative agenda, said he had decided not to testify at a joint legislative hearing today on the tax proposal legislation.
NEWS
June 10, 2007
County needs help to deal with BRAC The good news about the national military base realignment is that we're getting thousands of new jobs at Aberdeen Proving Ground. The bad news is we're being stuck with the costs of providing infrastructure for tens of thousands of new people. Harford County is trying to shoulder these responsibilities but is being denied the tools needed to do the job. For example, Harford has already forward-funded schools just to keep up with current growth. The state government provides much less than is needed because of its own money issues, we're told.
BUSINESS
March 17, 1999
Members of the Maryland Association of Certified Public Accountants are answering readers' tax questions through April 15. See below for how to submit a question.I work in the District of Columbia, for the D.C. government, but I reside in Baltimore. For two pay periods my employer mistakely sent my state taxes to D.C. instead of to Maryland. What can I do about that and how do I report my income tax?Maryland and the District of Columbia have adopted a reciprocal agreement that allows your compensation to be taxed in the state of Maryland, even though it is earned in the District of Columbia.
BUSINESS
By David Conn and David Conn,Annapolis Bureau of The Sun | February 1, 1991
ANNAPOLIS -- The Maryland Retail Merchants Association became yesterday the latest business group to speak out on a controversial tax package that, among other things, would expand and raise the state sales tax.Not surprisingly, the group found no merit in that aspect of the package, named the Linowes report after its chairman, Montgomery County lawyer R. Robert Linowes. The report, which the Schaefer administration has decided to send to the General Assembly, would raise about $800 million in new taxes to help poorer jurisdictions around the state, as well as raise money for education and transportation.
NEWS
By R. ROBERT LINOWES | April 2, 1991
There is never a good time to talk about taxes. GivenMaryland's softened economy and the current state budget deficit, the prospect of new taxes is neither popular nor promising.Yet, a discussion about Maryland's tax system is very much in order. Our system is outmoded and outdated. Over time it has failed to keep pace with the changing nature of the state and the needs of all our citizens. It is not a fair system -- either in how it taxes, or in how the revenue is expended.The Commission on State Taxes and Tax Structure was created in 1987 for the express purpose of finding ways to change and improve Maryland's tax system.
NEWS
By Suzanne Wooton and Suzanne Wooton,Sun Staff Correspondent | January 6, 1991
ANNAPOLIS -- First of all, Richard Dein wants to set the record straight. Boating is not yacht clubs, 42-foot sailboats and cabin cruisers. It's not fat cats and deep pockets. It's a 20-foot power boat, a fishing pole, a beer or two and a Sunday afternoon on the South River.But that garden-variety American dream is getting tougher and tougher for the little guy to afford, says Mr. Dein.Take beer, for instance. The price went up last week with the new federal excise tax. Gas has jumped to $1.30 a gallon, thanks to federal taxes and Iraqis.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.