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State Taxes

BUSINESS
March 17, 1999
Members of the Maryland Association of Certified Public Accountants are answering readers' tax questions through April 15. See below for how to submit a question.I work in the District of Columbia, for the D.C. government, but I reside in Baltimore. For two pay periods my employer mistakely sent my state taxes to D.C. instead of to Maryland. What can I do about that and how do I report my income tax?Maryland and the District of Columbia have adopted a reciprocal agreement that allows your compensation to be taxed in the state of Maryland, even though it is earned in the District of Columbia.
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BUSINESS
By David Conn and David Conn,Annapolis Bureau of The Sun | February 1, 1991
ANNAPOLIS -- The Maryland Retail Merchants Association became yesterday the latest business group to speak out on a controversial tax package that, among other things, would expand and raise the state sales tax.Not surprisingly, the group found no merit in that aspect of the package, named the Linowes report after its chairman, Montgomery County lawyer R. Robert Linowes. The report, which the Schaefer administration has decided to send to the General Assembly, would raise about $800 million in new taxes to help poorer jurisdictions around the state, as well as raise money for education and transportation.
NEWS
By R. ROBERT LINOWES | April 2, 1991
There is never a good time to talk about taxes. GivenMaryland's softened economy and the current state budget deficit, the prospect of new taxes is neither popular nor promising.Yet, a discussion about Maryland's tax system is very much in order. Our system is outmoded and outdated. Over time it has failed to keep pace with the changing nature of the state and the needs of all our citizens. It is not a fair system -- either in how it taxes, or in how the revenue is expended.The Commission on State Taxes and Tax Structure was created in 1987 for the express purpose of finding ways to change and improve Maryland's tax system.
NEWS
By Kerry O'Rourke and Kerry O'Rourke,Staff writer | December 16, 1990
WESTMINSTER - The plan calls for a tax increase that will affect even his wallet, but R. Robert Linowes, author of a state tax reform report, says it's the right thing to do."If the state is going to be economically sound, there's got to be money," he said. "There are no more free lunches. The bills are coming due."Linowes outlined the plan to members of the Carroll County Chamber of Commerce at a luncheon Thursday at Martin's Westminster."I assure you, I'm going to be hit as hard as anyone in this room," he said.
NEWS
By Saul Friedman and Saul Friedman,Newsday | October 15, 1992
WASHINGTON -- Texas billionaire Ross Perot, whose economic plan calls on the nation to participate in a "fair-share sacrifice," pays a smaller share of his income in taxes than most Americans and stands to pay even less under his proposal, according to a study of his holdings and to sources familiar with his finances.Precise figures are not available because Mr. Perot has refused to make his income-tax returns public or discuss his finances, and his office declined to return repeated calls.
BUSINESS
By Gady A. Epstein and Gady A. Epstein,SUN STAFF | April 15, 1999
So by now you may have figured out that the new Maryland tax form can be a pain in the neck. The one-page "short" sheet is gone, replaced by a longer, headache-inducing form with different rates and sets of exemptions for state and local taxes.Well, next year the short form is coming back. Legislators have to file taxes, too, and they have passed a bill getting rid of the extra work sheets and calculations.It may be too late for this year's tax day, but for next April taxpayers can count on a one-page form.
NEWS
January 6, 1991
No new taxes, State Sen. Charles H. Smelser, D-Carroll, Frederick, Howard, told farmers and business people Thursday morning."Right now, I'm not voting for any tax increase," he said at the monthly Agribusiness breakfast at Baugher's Restaurant.But other legislators probably will, he said."If I had to bet on it today, I'd bet there's going to be a gas tax increase," Smelser said in a briefing on the upcoming state legislative session.Smelser, a member of the Budget and Taxation Committee, said he's not too keen on a tax reform plan proposed by R. Robert Linowes, a Montgomery County lawyer who headed the governor's Commission on State Taxes and Tax Structure.
BUSINESS
By Amanda J. Crawford and Amanda J. Crawford,SUN STAFF | April 25, 2000
Thousands of Maryland and Virginia residents who work in Washington might soon be leaving something behind in the city: income tax. Under a proposal that Del. Eleanor Holmes Norton, a District of Columbia Democrat, plans to introduce in Congress on May 2, suburbanites, who make two-thirds of the income earned in Washington, would have 2 percent of their salaries redirected from federal income taxes to the city. The plan would not affect commuters' take-home pay or the amount of their state taxes.
NEWS
March 29, 2004
HERE'S A GOOD way to keep down state taxes - let's discourage the General Assembly from giving away an extra $88 million or so in corporate welfare this year. Remember the so-called Delaware loophole? It's the shell game that certain corporations have been playing for years to hide their income from Maryland taxes. It works like this: Say you're owner of the Blue Boy Bagel Co. with franchises across the state. You set up a dummy holding corporation in Delaware that charges your stores big bucks to lease the Blue Boy trademark.
NEWS
September 23, 2007
It's not unprecedented for the state of Maryland to tax a private, for-profit company that's doing business on public land. In fact, the law allows it - which makes Anne Arundel County's ire at the loss of tax revenue from a planned private development at Fort Meade understandable. The relocation of thousands of federal jobs to Fort Meade will increase traffic on roads leading to the base, but officials seeking compensation must focus their efforts on the private developer, not the government.
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