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NEWS
January 3, 2013
While increased tax rates may not be sending Maryland citizens elsewhere, as letter writer Neil L. Bergsman recently noted ("Tax rates don't send people out of state," Dec. 30), mainly because of natural inertia not to change location, the tax schedule does not invite people from out of state to decide to become Maryland residents. More importantly to the future economy of Maryland, the ever-increasing tax burdens present no incentive for industry or organizations to relocate here. Certainly, additional revenues are always needed, but at the same time attention must be paid to the long-term consequences and the impact on the future of Maryland's economy.
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NEWS
August 12, 2014
In a particularly naked bit of pandering, Republican gubernatorial candidate Larry Hogan appeared before the state Fraternal Order of Police this week as part of its process of determining its endorsement in the fall election and promised to exempt law enforcement officers' pensions from the state income tax. As intuitively appealing as it might seem to help those who have served, it's a bad idea. To his credit, Lt. Gov. Anthony G. Brown, the Democratic candidate, appeared before the same groups a day later and said he would not make that promise, preferring to seek comprehensive tax reform that benefits the middle class rather than making promises to every group.
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NEWS
February 14, 2014
The departure of Sun Products from Baltimore has rekindled letters and statements suggesting that Maryland's taxes are driving businesses out of the state ( "Sun Products move should be a wake-up call for tax-happy Md.," Feb. 13). No serious businessmen could make that statement. As a retired business CEO in Maryland, it is apparent to me that tax differentials between states are insignificant in a company's financial situation compared to other locational criteria. Location decisions are made primarily on the basis of demand for your products or services, the quality and adequacy of the local labor force, cost of materials, energy and transportation, location of markets, and quality of life that is increasingly important to attract talented employees.
NEWS
By Matthew Hay Brown | July 16, 2014
Republican gubernatorial nominee Larry Hogan told veterans Wednesday that he would eliminate the state income tax on military pensions if elected. “This tax is not only bad economic policy, it's also unfair to the men and women who have served our state and fought for our nation. You earned this tax break,” Hogan told members of the Maryland Department of the American Legion at their annual convention in Ocean City. “On day one we'll get to work on this,” he said. “And with the support of the 450,000 Maryland soldiers, sailors, airmen and Marines standing behind us, I'm confident we'll even be able to convince the tax-and-spend politicians in Annapolis that it is the right thing to do.” Hogan's campaign estimated that eliminating the tax would cost the state $40 million in revenue.
NEWS
By BRIAN SULLAM | November 15, 1992
It is not surprising that the people who paid for the notorious billboard over the Carroll County line in Pennsylvania -- the one that said "Welcome to Maryland, State of Taxes, Just Ahead" -- have never stepped forward. They are probably afraid they might be cited for violating the truth-in-advertising law.Although Maryland withholding taxes take a big chunk out of our paychecks, and the state sales tax adds 5 percent to most of our purchases, we don't live in a state with high taxes.Actually, 22 states have tax burdens a lot heavier than ours.
BUSINESS
By EILEEN AMBROSE | August 23, 2009
You don't have to own a Swiss bank account to evade taxes. Maybe you purposely underreport your income to the IRS or have gone along for years without filing a tax return. Or, you made a mistake significantly in your favor on the return and never fixed it. Whatever the case, it's not too late to make it right with the IRS. Uncle Sam prefers that you voluntarily come forward and pay what's due rather than having to track you down or, in serious cases, prosecute you. And while you're at it, you might need to make good on state taxes.
BUSINESS
By JAY HANCOCK | February 5, 2003
IN 1984, the soon-to-be amazingly profitable Toys `R' Us Inc. set up a Delaware-based subsidiary called Geoffrey Inc., named after a cartoon giraffe. Geoffrey became the owner of the Toys `R' Us name and several other trademarks. There was no logical reason to legally separate the Toys `R' Us name from the Toys `R' Us stores, which engage in the same business and are owned by the same people. But there were tax reasons, which often have little to do with logic. After creating Geoffrey, Toys `R' Us was able to spirit profits earned in Maryland and dozens of other states into Delaware, a Cayman Islands-style tax haven near Philadelphia, where they were largely bulletproof against William Donald Schaefer and other state taxmasters.
BUSINESS
By Ted Shelsby | February 5, 1992
The president and former chief financial officer of a Bethesda-based lumber distribution company have pleaded guilty to criminal charges involving the theft of more than $372,000 in sales and withholding taxes from the state of Maryland, the attorney general's office said yesterday.Bruce Gordon, president of Structural Systems Inc., admitted guilt Monday in not turning over collected tax revenues to the state. Although the violation is a misdemeanor, the maximum penalty is five years' imprisonment and a $5,000 fine, said Norman L. Smith, the assistant attorney general who prosecuted the case.
NEWS
By John W. Frece and Thomas W. Waldron Laura Lippman contributed to this story | February 4, 1992
ANNAPOLIS -- An ad hoc group of legislative leaders has decided that the state should raise $450 million in new taxes next year. But they haven't decided exactly who should pay the tab.The delegates and senators, who have been meeting off and on for more than two months, agreed the General Assembly should raise the new taxes and cut $700 million in spending to get the state's fiscal year 1993 budget in balance.They want to earmark $50 million of the new taxes for the state's poorest jurisdictions, Baltimore most prominent among them.
NEWS
By Jon Morgan and Jon Morgan,Evening Sun Staff | April 23, 1991
Maryland's much-maligned tax structure -- criticized for unfairly burdening the poor -- actually does a better job than most states in sparing the poor. It does so, however, by hitting the middle class harder than the rich, according to a new study.And, while the state's tax structure has grown more "progressive" over the last six years, the plight of the middle class at tax time has worsened.The study, released yesterday by the Washington-based Citizens for Tax Justice, looked at the relationship between taxes and income in 50 states and District of Columbia.
BUSINESS
By Natalie Sherman, The Baltimore Sun | July 2, 2014
The state has approved bigger tax breaks for industrial properties in Southeast Baltimore, including the site of a new Amazon warehouse. Designed to spur job creation, the benefits took effect Tuesday. The new "focus areas" provide property owners with a 10-year, 80 percent property tax credit on value added by physical improvements. They also boost the credits granted for wages paid to new employees and offer breaks for investments in "personal property," such as machinery. The benefits apply to about 2.4 square miles around Holabird Avenue and about 7.4 square miles in Orangeville, excluding the residential area.
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella, The Baltimore Sun | July 1, 2014
More than 100 applicants are vying for $12 million worth of Maryland tax credits available to biotechnology investors in fiscal 2015, state economic development officials said. Applications for the Biotechnology Investment Incentive Tax Credit program were submitted online Tuesday to the state Department of Business and Economic Development. The program, first funded in fiscal 2007, has spurred investment of more than $120 million in 70 biotech firms, state officials said. Some Baltimore area companies that received investments last year include American Gene Technologies International, Animalgesic Laboratories, Cerecor Inc., Clear Guide Medical and Diagnostic Biochips.
FEATURES
By Julie Scharper, The Baltimore Sun | May 5, 2014
Maryland, it's not the land of pleasant living any more.   At least not according to nearly half the state's population.  About 47 percent of Marylanders would like to move out of state, according to a recent Gallup poll .  The Free State came just behind Illinois and Connecticut as a state that had the largest population of residents looking to flee.  In contrast, less than a quarter of the residents of Montana, Hawaii (well,...
NEWS
March 10, 2014
The announcement last week by Maryland's Board of Revenue Estimates that the state will be taking in $238 million less in taxes this year and next was certainly unwelcome, and it complicates the already difficult task the General Assembly faces in enacting a balanced budget before it adjourns in April. The amount of tooth-gnashing it has prompted, however, is wildly out of proportion to its actual impact on the state's overall spending plans. Comptroller Peter Franchot, who as chairman of the Board of Revenue Estimates was on hand to approve the new figures on Thursday, told The Washington post that the numbers are "proof positive that something is wrong.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser | February 18, 2014
Republican gubernatorial candidate David R. Craig released a plan Tuesday would put Maryland on a "glide path" toward eliminating its state income tax while cutting total spending by a minimum of 3 percent a year. Craig, who has been Harford County executive for the past decade, said such a move would stimulate economic growth and halt a loss of population to states with lower taxes. "We must restore Maryland to the way it was and we need a governor who knows how to do it," he said.
NEWS
February 14, 2014
The departure of Sun Products from Baltimore has rekindled letters and statements suggesting that Maryland's taxes are driving businesses out of the state ( "Sun Products move should be a wake-up call for tax-happy Md.," Feb. 13). No serious businessmen could make that statement. As a retired business CEO in Maryland, it is apparent to me that tax differentials between states are insignificant in a company's financial situation compared to other locational criteria. Location decisions are made primarily on the basis of demand for your products or services, the quality and adequacy of the local labor force, cost of materials, energy and transportation, location of markets, and quality of life that is increasingly important to attract talented employees.
BUSINESS
By EILEEN AMBROSE | August 4, 2009
Mark Lecates took advantage of the "cash for clunkers" program about 10 days ago, getting $4,500 off the price of a new Honda Civic for scrapping his nearly 10-year-old Ford Explorer. He has no complaints, but he does have a question about Maryland taxes in the transaction. The Baltimore resident paid state taxes on the full cost of the vehicle - before $4,500 was knocked off the price. His tax bill on the sale totaled around $1,025. By paying taxes on the clunker incentive, Lecates figures he paid an extra $270.
NEWS
By John W. Frece and John W. Frece,SUN STAFF | October 9, 1995
OCEAN CITY -- Maryland's largest business organization will call today for a 15 percent cut in the state and local personal income tax rate as a way of making Maryland more competitive for jobs.In welcoming remarks at the Maryland Chamber of Commerce's two-day legislative conference here, Chairman Wayne A. Mills is expected to urge the governor and General Assembly to adopt a 25 percent tax rate reduction as an eventual goal.But as a first step, Mr. Mills, vice president and general manager for Washington Gas Light's Maryland division, said the 1996 General Assembly should approve a 15 percent cut that would begin in 1997 and be phased in over three years.
NEWS
By Anirban Basu and Zach Fritz | December 29, 2013
How did it come to this? Between 2007 and 2012, the State of Maryland raised taxes and fees 24 times according to Change Maryland, including raising income taxes during a 2012 special legislative session, increasing the sales tax on alcoholic beverages from 6 percent to 9 percent in 2011, and levying a hospital assessment that year. Despite these revenue enhancements, the state faces unexpectedly large fiscal deficits this year and next. What was estimated to be a $300 million surplus for fiscal year 2014 is now an $87 million deficit.
NEWS
November 12, 2013
Maryland, like the rest of this country, owes its military veterans a debt of gratitude. Not just those who were wounded in the armed conflicts of recent years but everyone who ever wore a uniform of the armed services of this country. From the volunteers who greet returning military at Baltimore-Washington International Thurgood Marshall Airport to the local employers who give hiring preference or discounts to veterans, we would not begrudge them a thing. Words alone are inadequate to express our thanks, and we believe the federal government has a solemn obligation to ensure that their needs, particularly in health care and the transition to civilian life, are met. But one of the latest proposals to emerge from the candidates running to be Maryland's next governor - to eliminate state taxes on military pensions - is not the right way to go about helping veterans.
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