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By THE BOSTON GLOBE | July 6, 1997
State Street Global Advisors, the money management arm of State Street Corp., is getting into the affordable housing business.State Street said last week that it has created an investment fund for institutional investors that will provide up to $100 million in mortgage money for affordable units around the country. That could produce 4,000 units of housing over the next three years.State Street put together the fund with the thought that it would offer competitive rates for fixed-income investors.
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NEWS
By JEAN MARBELLA and JEAN MARBELLA,jean.marbella@baltsun.com | September 11, 2008
Pity poor Pratt Street. It is a big street but little loved, one that manages to be pedestrian, as in undistinguished, and yet not pedestrian-friendly, as in eminently stroll-able. No lyricists have been moved to immortalize it, as they have "State Street, that great street," or "the avenue, Fifth Avenue." So I had one question yesterday when the city unveiled a huge, $100 million redevelopment plan to freshen up and enliven the street: Is $100 million enough? No, seriously, Pratt in its current incarnation isn't all that bad. It's just neutral - the equivalent of flyover country.
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BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG NEWS | March 22, 2003
BOSTON - Shares of State Street Corp., the world's largest custodian of assets, took their biggest tumble in almost 10 years yesterday after the company said a prolonged slump in stock prices and lower long-term interest rates will reduce its earnings by about half this quarter. State Street fell $4.39, or 11 percent, to $34.11 yesterday on the New York Stock Exchange, after tumbling 16 percent to $32.50 earlier in the day. It was the stock's biggest drop since April 1993, when the shares lost 18 percent.
NEWS
By JEAN MARBELLA | September 8, 2006
I went to bid farewell to Hecht's this week, but there wasn't much left of Baltimore's last homegrown department store. Tomorrow, the few remaining Hecht's stores in the area become Macy's, the upshot of the merger of their corporate parents in February 2005. The transition has been under way for months, but after tomorrow, the Hecht's name will vanish from Baltimore's retail landscape after 149 years. It exits with more of a whimper than a bang, a store that never quite captured its city's heart in the way that Woodie's held Washington's or Marshall Field's owned Chicago's.
NEWS
August 30, 2004
Laura Branigan, 47, a Grammy-nominated pop singer best known for her 1982 platinum hit "Gloria," died Thursday of a brain aneurysm in her sleep at her home in East Quogue, N.Y. Her brother Mark Branigan said she had complained to a friend of a headache for about two weeks before she died, but had not sought medical attention. "Gloria," a signature song from her debut album Branigan, stayed atop the pop charts for 36 weeks and earned her a Grammy nomination for best female pop vocalist, the first of four nominations in her career.
FEATURES
By Meg Sullivan and Meg Sullivan,Los Angeles Daily News | August 7, 1991
SANTA BARBARA, Calif. -- As Steve Garcia rumbled slowly down State Street on a recent evening here, he was treated more like a one-man parade than a police officer working a beat.A little boy looked up from his ice cream cone and sighed, "Awesome!" A carload of people flashed him the thumbs-up sign. Patrons of an open-air bar jumped up and cheered.The object of admiration wasn't the 14-year veteran of the Santa Barbara Police Department but rather, his fancy wheels.Sporting a flashy paint job, low-slung tires, mag wheels and chromed engine parts, Garcia's car is not your standard-issue police unit.
NEWS
By JEAN MARBELLA | September 8, 2006
I went to bid farewell to Hecht's this week, but there wasn't much left of Baltimore's last homegrown department store. Tomorrow, the few remaining Hecht's stores in the area become Macy's, the upshot of the merger of their corporate parents in February 2005. The transition has been under way for months, but after tomorrow, the Hecht's name will vanish from Baltimore's retail landscape after 149 years. It exits with more of a whimper than a bang, a store that never quite captured its city's heart in the way that Woodie's held Washington's or Marshall Field's owned Chicago's.
TRAVEL
August 27, 2000
MY BEST SHOT A walker's view of England By Paul Niedringhaus, Pasadena Cotswold Way is one of England's most famous long-distance hiking trails. It stretches from Chipping Campden southwest to the town of Bath, a total of 102 miles. The trail is well marked and winds through farm fields, small villages and medieval forests. It is a civilized sort of hiking, every bit as rewarding as my most rugged backpacking trips -- just without the hardship. A MEMORABLE PLACE Falling for Albany's aura By Tony Glaros SPECIAL TO THE SUN I love New York.
NEWS
By JEAN MARBELLA and JEAN MARBELLA,jean.marbella@baltsun.com | September 11, 2008
Pity poor Pratt Street. It is a big street but little loved, one that manages to be pedestrian, as in undistinguished, and yet not pedestrian-friendly, as in eminently stroll-able. No lyricists have been moved to immortalize it, as they have "State Street, that great street," or "the avenue, Fifth Avenue." So I had one question yesterday when the city unveiled a huge, $100 million redevelopment plan to freshen up and enliven the street: Is $100 million enough? No, seriously, Pratt in its current incarnation isn't all that bad. It's just neutral - the equivalent of flyover country.
TRAVEL
By JAMIE STIEHM and JAMIE STIEHM,SUN REPORTER | May 28, 2006
CHICAGO // How do you take a spring fling in this city without springing for an expensive vacation? First, plan to spend a lot of time outdoors and second, hope for fine weather. With spring in the air and summer just around the corner, I headed to Chicago for a $500 getaway. The plan was to meet up with my mother -- who was traveling from California -- for some sightseeing. On a clear April day, I arrived in the city as tulips blooming in a kaleidoscope of color set the tone. A dash of boosterism added to the atmosphere: Banners with Mayor Richard M. Daley's picture that proclaim, "We're Glad You're Here!"
TRAVEL
By JAMIE STIEHM and JAMIE STIEHM,SUN REPORTER | May 28, 2006
CHICAGO // How do you take a spring fling in this city without springing for an expensive vacation? First, plan to spend a lot of time outdoors and second, hope for fine weather. With spring in the air and summer just around the corner, I headed to Chicago for a $500 getaway. The plan was to meet up with my mother -- who was traveling from California -- for some sightseeing. On a clear April day, I arrived in the city as tulips blooming in a kaleidoscope of color set the tone. A dash of boosterism added to the atmosphere: Banners with Mayor Richard M. Daley's picture that proclaim, "We're Glad You're Here!"
NEWS
August 30, 2004
Laura Branigan, 47, a Grammy-nominated pop singer best known for her 1982 platinum hit "Gloria," died Thursday of a brain aneurysm in her sleep at her home in East Quogue, N.Y. Her brother Mark Branigan said she had complained to a friend of a headache for about two weeks before she died, but had not sought medical attention. "Gloria," a signature song from her debut album Branigan, stayed atop the pop charts for 36 weeks and earned her a Grammy nomination for best female pop vocalist, the first of four nominations in her career.
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG NEWS | March 22, 2003
BOSTON - Shares of State Street Corp., the world's largest custodian of assets, took their biggest tumble in almost 10 years yesterday after the company said a prolonged slump in stock prices and lower long-term interest rates will reduce its earnings by about half this quarter. State Street fell $4.39, or 11 percent, to $34.11 yesterday on the New York Stock Exchange, after tumbling 16 percent to $32.50 earlier in the day. It was the stock's biggest drop since April 1993, when the shares lost 18 percent.
BUSINESS
By William Patalon III and William Patalon III,SUN STAFF | March 1, 2003
The Maryland retirement system is getting out of the money-management business and has given Boston-based State Street Global Advisors the task of managing about $11 billion - or 45 percent - of the state's $25 billion in pension funds, the embattled agency announced yesterday. The shift away from internal money management is the latest in a series of sweeping internal changes enacted by the State Retirement and Pension System of Maryland, largely because of a series of serious management lapses that have been chronicled in The Sun. The Maryland General Assembly is also pushing for reform because of the mismanagement, and two weeks ago recommended a major overhaul of the state pension board.
TRAVEL
August 27, 2000
MY BEST SHOT A walker's view of England By Paul Niedringhaus, Pasadena Cotswold Way is one of England's most famous long-distance hiking trails. It stretches from Chipping Campden southwest to the town of Bath, a total of 102 miles. The trail is well marked and winds through farm fields, small villages and medieval forests. It is a civilized sort of hiking, every bit as rewarding as my most rugged backpacking trips -- just without the hardship. A MEMORABLE PLACE Falling for Albany's aura By Tony Glaros SPECIAL TO THE SUN I love New York.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,SUN STAFF | May 1, 2000
Main Street in Sykesville is lined with shops, businesses and restaurants. But the town has little control over the downtown street, a state-owned highway known as Route 851. Ownership could give the town authority to schedule a festival or fill potholes along its main thoroughfare. The town will take the initial steps toward making Main Street a municipal road at a public hearing May 8 with the State Highway Administration. "Complete ownership gives the town more independence and is sometimes more conducive to the business of town," said Laura Rakowski, spokeswoman for the State Highway Administration.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,SUN STAFF | May 1, 2000
Main Street in Sykesville is lined with shops, businesses and restaurants. But the town has little control over the downtown street, a state-owned highway known as Route 851. Ownership could give the town authority to schedule a festival or fill potholes along its main thoroughfare. The town will take the initial steps toward making Main Street a municipal road at a public hearing May 8 with the State Highway Administration. "Complete ownership gives the town more independence and is sometimes more conducive to the business of town," said Laura Rakowski, spokeswoman for the State Highway Administration.
BUSINESS
By William Patalon III and William Patalon III,SUN STAFF | March 1, 2003
The Maryland retirement system is getting out of the money-management business and has given Boston-based State Street Global Advisors the task of managing about $11 billion - or 45 percent - of the state's $25 billion in pension funds, the embattled agency announced yesterday. The shift away from internal money management is the latest in a series of sweeping internal changes enacted by the State Retirement and Pension System of Maryland, largely because of a series of serious management lapses that have been chronicled in The Sun. The Maryland General Assembly is also pushing for reform because of the mismanagement, and two weeks ago recommended a major overhaul of the state pension board.
BUSINESS
By THE BOSTON GLOBE | July 6, 1997
State Street Global Advisors, the money management arm of State Street Corp., is getting into the affordable housing business.State Street said last week that it has created an investment fund for institutional investors that will provide up to $100 million in mortgage money for affordable units around the country. That could produce 4,000 units of housing over the next three years.State Street put together the fund with the thought that it would offer competitive rates for fixed-income investors.
FEATURES
By Meg Sullivan and Meg Sullivan,Los Angeles Daily News | August 7, 1991
SANTA BARBARA, Calif. -- As Steve Garcia rumbled slowly down State Street on a recent evening here, he was treated more like a one-man parade than a police officer working a beat.A little boy looked up from his ice cream cone and sighed, "Awesome!" A carload of people flashed him the thumbs-up sign. Patrons of an open-air bar jumped up and cheered.The object of admiration wasn't the 14-year veteran of the Santa Barbara Police Department but rather, his fancy wheels.Sporting a flashy paint job, low-slung tires, mag wheels and chromed engine parts, Garcia's car is not your standard-issue police unit.
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