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By Jack L. Levin | March 25, 1993
WALKING past the open window of an elementary schoo classroom, I heard the children singing the familiar words of "Maryland, My Maryland" -- familiar because I had sung them as a pupil some 70 years ago.In this time of change, in Washington and throughout the world, it seems to me that the time has come to consider changing the Maryland anthem. The words are meaningless to most children (as they were to me three-score-and-10 years ago) and insulting to the Maryland Free State.Those being urged not to "cower in the dust" were the owners and exploiters of some 84,000 slaves still in bondage in Maryland when the song was written by a passionate Yankee-hater, James Ryder Randall.
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NEWS
February 21, 2011
I wish to comment on the issue of renaming Negro Mountain and Polish Mountain in Western Maryland, which seems to be a hot topic before the state legislature this session. Seems to me that in lieu of a severely mounting state deficit, high unemployment and other pressing matters which are literally consuming this state's resources, some of our state representatives find it necessary to waste valuable time and resources on this endeavor. These mountains were duly named back in their time to hail accomplishments by their namesakes, and I find it offensive to change that.
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NEWS
By Neal Lavon | March 19, 2001
TAKOMA PARK -- Three high school students from the Washington suburbs, armed with the support of Democratic Del. Peter Franchot of Takoma Park, fulfilled part of a class project recently by suggesting the General Assembly repeal "Maryland, My Maryland" as the state song. Earlier attempts to retire it were unsuccessful. For history's sake, I hope this one results in a similar outcome. I'm neither a Confederate sympathizer nor do I wish to re-fight the Civil War. The Confederacy may have been many things, but its reason for existence sprang from human bondage, and it had to be defeated.
NEWS
April 10, 2009
As a historical artifact, Maryland's state song is an invaluable insight into the mindset of Maryland in 1861. We were a state awash in Southern sympathizers, and we looked none too kindly upon Abraham Lincoln and the Union Army. It's not just a few anti-Lincoln references here or there in the nine-stanza poem set to "O Tannenbaum"; the song is a rallying cry to defend against "Northern scum." Those lyrics may be offensive by modern sensibilities (it's hard not to be a little taken aback when one of the nation's greatest presidents is referred to as a despot right off the bat)
NEWS
By Michael Olesker | March 8, 2001
ONCE AGAIN in Annapolis, the deep thinkers get the marvelous chance to answer a simple question: Must we live with a piece of history that should embarrass absolutely everyone? Del. Peter Franchot, a Montgomery County legislator acting at the behest of a 15-year-old high school kid who sees what the grownups around him have missed, is asking the General Assembly this week to scratch "Maryland, My Maryland" as the official state song. As a piece of music, it is derived from an old drinking melody.
NEWS
By Nicole Fuller and Nicole Fuller,nicole.fuller@baltsun.com | March 15, 2009
The fourth graders at Glen Burnie Park Elementary School had strong reactions the first time many of them heard the Maryland state song, a rousing Civil War era tune. An Thai, a 10-year-old, said the song struck her as "too long and unpleasant." Kewannie Edwards said he was confused. The song had harsh words for Abraham Lincoln, celebrated as one of the country's great presidents. "It called Abraham Lincoln a despot," said Edwards, 9. "It was mean." So the students wrote to their local legislators, including Del. Pamela G. Beidle, who ultimately agreed with her young constituents and crafted legislation to get rid of the 70-year-old state song, "Maryland, My Maryland," and replace it with a shorter and tamer song.
NEWS
By Julie Bykowicz and Julie Bykowicz,julie.bykowicz@baltsun.com | March 7, 2009
Sen. Jennie Forehand was attending a conference of Southern lawmakers some years ago when Maryland, My Maryland, the state song, began playing at a ceremony. An impassioned Confederate-era poem set to the tune of O Tannenbaum, the song takes a particularly exclamatory turn at the end: "She is not dead, nor deaf, nor dumb - Huzza! She spurns the Northern scum! She breathes! She burns! She'll come! She'll come! Maryland! My Maryland!" "People were laughing at it," said Forehand, a Montgomery County Democrat, "They were asking, 'What in the world is this all about?
NEWS
By Sarah Koenig and Sarah Koenig,SUN STAFF | February 15, 2002
It was April 1861, and James Ryder Randall of Louisiana couldn't sleep. He had just read a newspaper account of how his former college roommate was killed in a Pratt Street riot between Confederate sympathizers and Union soldiers from Massachusetts. "I could not dismiss what I had read in the paper from my mind. About midnight I rose, lit a candle, and went to my desk," Randall recalled 20 years later. "Some powerful spirit appeared to possess me, and almost involuntarily I proceeded to write the song of `My Maryland.
NEWS
By Laura Cadiz and Laura Cadiz,SUN STAFF | May 17, 2001
Late Saturday afternoon, the strains of "Maryland, My Maryland" will play across the Pimlico infield and national television as the horses parade out for the 126th running of the Preakness Stakes. About two hours later, to a far smaller audience at an Annapolis retirement community, a group of young singers will perform a new version of "Maryland, My Maryland" - one they think should replace the inflammatory 1861 call to the Confederacy by James Ryder Randall with lyrics by a 14-year-old Millersville girl.
NEWS
December 5, 1999
1935: Lillie C. Jackson begins NAACP presidency1939: State buys Morgan College1939: "Maryland, My Maryland" is state songPub Date: 12/08/99
NEWS
April 8, 2009
State song hangs on, but change is in the air "Maryland, My Maryland" will retain its place as official state song, for now. State lawmakers rejected an attempt this year to change the Confederate-era poem, but key senators recently vowed to revisit the issue when the legislative session ends next week. Among those who have changed their tune is Senate President Thomas V. Mike Miller, a history buff who previously defended the song for its historical value. "It was a great war song. The words were just stunning, but of course offensive to a great many people," the Democrat from Calvert County said Tuesday, adding that "it certainly needs to be modified."
NEWS
By Julie Bykowicz and Julie Bykowicz,julie.bykowicz@baltsun.com | March 25, 2009
The Senate president - a huge history buff - made a startling announcement Tuesday, the eve of the celebration of Maryland's 375th birthday. Thomas V. Mike Miller said the time has come to change the state song. Breaking with his past unfailing support of maintaining "Maryland, My Maryland" the way it is, despite its decidedly pro-Confederate slant, Miller told lawmakers that they should at least change "a couple of stanzas" of the song. The final stanza of James Ryder Randall's 1861 poem, later set to the tune of "O Tannenbaum" and adopted in 1939 as the state song, is particularly inflammatory: "She is not dead, nor deaf, nor dumb - / Huzza!
NEWS
By Nicole Fuller and Nicole Fuller,nicole.fuller@baltsun.com | March 15, 2009
The fourth graders at Glen Burnie Park Elementary School had strong reactions the first time many of them heard the Maryland state song, a rousing Civil War era tune. An Thai, a 10-year-old, said the song struck her as "too long and unpleasant." Kewannie Edwards said he was confused. The song had harsh words for Abraham Lincoln, celebrated as one of the country's great presidents. "It called Abraham Lincoln a despot," said Edwards, 9. "It was mean." So the students wrote to their local legislators, including Del. Pamela G. Beidle, who ultimately agreed with her young constituents and crafted legislation to get rid of the 70-year-old state song, "Maryland, My Maryland," and replace it with a shorter and tamer song.
NEWS
March 14, 2009
City needs funds to repair pipes The Baltimore Sun's article about the Washington Suburban Sanitary Commission seeking to claim a portion of the stimulus money available for water projects that would otherwise go to Baltimore cited the recent Montgomery County water-main break seen on national TV ("Md. to review water grants," March 6). But I, for one, think funding projects in one of the nation's richest counties, Montgomery County, by taking money from a poorer jurisdiction, Baltimore, is counterproductive.
NEWS
By Julie Bykowicz and Julie Bykowicz,julie.bykowicz@baltsun.com | March 7, 2009
Sen. Jennie Forehand was attending a conference of Southern lawmakers some years ago when Maryland, My Maryland, the state song, began playing at a ceremony. An impassioned Confederate-era poem set to the tune of O Tannenbaum, the song takes a particularly exclamatory turn at the end: "She is not dead, nor deaf, nor dumb - Huzza! She spurns the Northern scum! She breathes! She burns! She'll come! She'll come! Maryland! My Maryland!" "People were laughing at it," said Forehand, a Montgomery County Democrat, "They were asking, 'What in the world is this all about?
NEWS
September 11, 2002
Kenneth J. Yablonski, 68, a lawyer who championed workers' compensation benefits before and after his labor leader father was slain by fellow union members, died of a heart attack Sunday in Washington, Pa. A black wreath hung Monday on the main door of Yablonski, Costello and Leckie, the law firm he helped found. His father, Joseph "Jock" Yablonski, an unsuccessful candidate for the presidency of the United Mine Workers of America, was found murdered with his wife and daughter at their Clarksville, Pa., home in 1969.
NEWS
By Dan Berger | April 20, 2001
Uh-oh. The market thinks the recession is over. The market is never right. The Confederate battle flag, emblem for the violent destruction of the United States, will remain on the state flag of Mississippi. A poem urging that course will remain the state song of Maryland. So is Maryland better than Mississippi? Hizzoner would condemn City Hall if it stood in the path of the West Side project.
NEWS
By NEWPORT NEWS DAILY PRESS | January 28, 1997
RICHMOND, Va. -- For more than 50 years, Virginia lawmakers have clung to an official state song whose racist lyrics have long been an embarrassment.With no one eager to sing about "the old darkey" or "Massa and Missis," the song -- "Carry Me Back to Old Virginia" -- is no longer played at state functions or taught in the public schools.Yet year after year, attempts by the General Assembly to change the song end in failure. Now some lawmakers are pushing a plan with a twist.The state Senate will take up a bill today to declare the tune the "official song emeritus" of the commonwealth.
NEWS
By FROM STAFF REPORTS | February 23, 2002
Senate vote kills latest attempt to replace state song "Maryland! My Maryland!" the 1861 Confederate anthem that mentions blood, gore and "Northern scum," has withstood the latest attempt to replace it as the state song. After a spirited public hearing, a Senate panel voted 6-3 yesterday to kill the bill, which would have replaced the song's lyrics with a pastoral poem written in 1894 by a Western Maryland schoolteacher. "I do believe we need to change the song, but this might not be the one," Sen. Paul G. Pinsky, a Prince George's Democrat, said of the suggested replacement.
NEWS
By Sarah Koenig and Sarah Koenig,SUN STAFF | February 15, 2002
It was April 1861, and James Ryder Randall of Louisiana couldn't sleep. He had just read a newspaper account of how his former college roommate was killed in a Pratt Street riot between Confederate sympathizers and Union soldiers from Massachusetts. "I could not dismiss what I had read in the paper from my mind. About midnight I rose, lit a candle, and went to my desk," Randall recalled 20 years later. "Some powerful spirit appeared to possess me, and almost involuntarily I proceeded to write the song of `My Maryland.
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