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By Annie Linskey | annie.linskey@baltsun.com | March 20, 2010
The state Senate gave preliminary approval to an expansion of gambling into Prince George's County, voting for a measure Friday that would allow card games at the faltering Rosecroft Raceway pending a voter-supported constitutional amendment. The measure, a local bill backed by Senate President Thomas V. Mike Miller, stirred a broad debate about enhancing gambling options in Maryland, which is struggling to launch a slot-machine program approved by voters in 2008. Sen. Delores G. Kelley, a Baltimore County Democrat, said the local bill should be expanded and supported a proposal allowing card games at Maryland's five authorized slot-machine venues, as well as at Rosecroft.
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By Pamela Wood and Michael Dresser and The Baltimore Sun | October 1, 2014
A Republican state Senate candidate from Annapolis has admitted he falsely claimed to hold a college degree, saying he hasn't yet graduated. Don Quinn, who is running against longtime Democratic Sen. John C. Astle, said he's been taking online courses from Washington State University for about four years, but is 12 credits shy of earning his degree. Quinn's LinkedIn profile and an online biography he submitted to The Baltimore Sun claim he holds a degree from Washington State.
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NEWS
By Alison Knezevich, The Baltimore Sun | April 5, 2012
Legislation to add elected members to the all-appointed Baltimore County school board cleared the state Senate on Thursday. Under the amended House bill, which passed the Senate 34-9, the school board would have six elected members and five members appointed by the governor, said state Sen. Bobby Zirkin. The Pikesville Democrat had sponsored a Senate measure to create a partially elected school board. The County Council would draw election districts in consultation with the county school board, he said.
NEWS
By Alison Knezevich and The Baltimore Sun | September 27, 2014
Campaigns on Baltimore County's east side are still in full swing, but one outcome is already certain: For the first time in nearly half a century, voters get a new state senator. Democratic Sen. Norman Stone, who took office in 1967, is retiring from the General Assembly. Fellow Democrat John Olszewski Jr., currently a state delegate; Republican Johnny Ray Salling, a steelworker; and unaffiliated candidate Scott Collier are competing to replace him. Stone, who entered the Senate the year Spiro Agnew became governor, is its longest-serving member.
NEWS
By Erin Cox, The Baltimore Sun | February 4, 2014
Maryland senators will resume debate Wednesday on whether to outlaw the sale of grain alcohol, a colorless spirit so potent the chamber voted to ban it twice before. More than a dozen other states already forbid the sale of the 190-proof liquor, according to state analysts. The proposal has died in the House of Delegates in the past, but was revived with a new lawmakers pushing it this year. On Tuesday, the Senate took up the question of whether its prevalence on college campuses contributed to alcohol poisoning, and whether banning it would hurt small businesses that sell it. Democrat Sen. Rich Madaleno of Montgomery County said the president of Frostburg State University asked him to introduce the bill to ban substance, which is nearly pure alcohol, because of the problems it creates at colleges.
NEWS
By Erin Cox and The Baltimore Sun | January 21, 2014
The Maryland Senate approved an emergency plan Tuesday designed to help people stuck without insurance because of the state's glitch-ridden health exchange. Lawmakers vowed inquiries will continue into what went wrong. The emergency proposal, which now moves to the House of Delegates, would allow people to sign up for the state's high-risk insurance program that was supposed to end when the Affordable Care Act took effect. The coverage would be retroactive to Jan. 1. State officials estimate that as many as 5,000 people who tried without success to buy policies online may seek coverage through the legislation. The four companies that sell policies through the exchange also agreed to allow people to sign up for retroactive coverage dating back to Jan. 1 if they signed up for coverage by 5 p.m. Tuesday.
NEWS
By BARRY RASCOVAR | April 17, 1994
What went wrong in the State House this year? How is it that the General Assembly session ended this past week with so little the way of significant accomplishments?Don't blame it on William Donald Schaefer this time.In the past, he may have been petulant, unsympathetic and arrogant in dealing with lawmakers. But not this year. Governor Schaefer proved the model of diplomacy and accommodation. He was both sensible and cunning, flexible and encouraging. Yet his modest package of bills was decimated at session's end.Don't blame this debacle on House Speaker Casper R. Taylor, either.
NEWS
By William Thompson and William Thompson,Evening Sun Staff | January 17, 1991
A bomb scare that turned out to be a simple misunderstanding brought a measure of comic relief to state lawmakers meeting today in Annapolis.On edge this morning following yesterday's outbreak of war, a security guard posted in the James Senate Office Building suspected foul play was at hand when a man rushed in, dropped a battered briefcase onto the floor and left.The man, who turned out to be Sen. Arthur Dorman, D-Prince George's, was not immediately identified as a lawmaker. Instead, the guard called for help, and within minutes the office building was cleared of workers while police began an investigation.
NEWS
By Gregory Kane | January 30, 2002
"DON'T JUST do something, stand there!" For the past two years, on legislation that would allow Maryland to vie for the $200 million in federal money allocated to start charter schools, this state's Senate has been doing nothing and standing there. Last year, Del. John Leopold of Anne Arundel County sponsored legislation that would permit Marylanders to apply for federal funds to establish charter schools. He did the same the year before. The House of Delegates passed Leopold's bill both years.
NEWS
By James M. Coram and James M. Coram,Sun Staff Writer | May 11, 1994
Former state Sen. Edward J. Kasemeyer got out of one political race yesterday and into another.Soured in his gubernatorial bid, but still sweet on public service, Mr. Kasemeyer said he hopes to return to the state Senate, this time from District 12.He was elected to the Senate from District 14 in 1986 after serving a term as a General Assembly delegate from the "B" portion of that district."
NEWS
By Jeff Barker and Erin Cox, The Baltimore Sun | July 11, 2014
Two Maryland lawmakers said Friday they will ask a state Senate committee to explore the death of a 10-year-old disabled foster child who was in the care of a group home. Another state senator who advocates for people with disabilities said the boy's death at the Laurel-area group home pointed to a shortage of funding and resources to serve vulnerable people in Maryland. The Baltimore Sun reported Thursday that the boy died as the state was in the process of shutting down the home amid concern about staffing problems at the center.
NEWS
By Ian Duncan, The Baltimore Sun | June 9, 2014
The Hershey Company is accusing a state senator from Queen Anne's County of using chocolate-colored campaign signs to draw on its sugary "fame and equity" in a bid to drum up votes. In a federal lawsuit filed last week, the Pennsylvania-based confectioner asked a judge to stop Sen. Stephen S. Hershey Jr. from using campaign materials that it believes are too similar to its own logo and packaging. "Hershey is bringing this action to stop Senator Steve Hershey and his campaign from using the famous trade dress of the Hershey's chocolate bar in connection with Senator Hershey's campaign activities," the company wrote in a complaint.
NEWS
By Erin Cox, The Baltimore Sun | May 26, 2014
Frederick voters may notice a theme to their primary ballots next month: Young for state senator. Young for county executive. Young for county school board. Young for state delegate. Politics, after all, is the Young family business. "I was driving the other day, and I literally saw all four of their campaign signs on the same corner," said Todd Anderson, a federal contractor who lives in the city of Frederick. "I guess we've got kind of a Kennedy clan here. " The family's dominance in city and county politics is measured in decades.
NEWS
By Mary K. Tilghman, mtilghman@tribune.com | May 13, 2014
Public education - the new hybrid school board, school safety and overcrowding - dominated discussions among the three candidates for the 42nd District's state Senate seat. Just six weeks before the primary, incumbent Sen. Jim Brochin, a Democrat of Towson, Democrat Connie DeJuliis, of Glen Arm, who represented Dundalk in the House of Delegates for one term in the 1990s, and Republican Tim Robinson, a physician from Timonium, faced off at the Idlewylde Community Center. Brochin, who is seeking his fourth term, will face DeJuliis in the Democratic primary election June 24. The winner will face Robinson in the general election Nov. 4. All three candidates told the audience of about 25 that they believe these issues were better handled by county officials, but promised their support.
NEWS
By Carrie Wells, The Baltimore Sun | May 12, 2014
A high-ranking state official whose wife is running against Baltimore County State Sen. Jim Brochin is being accused of stealing Brochin's campaign signs, an incident the senator's opponent called "a misunderstanding. " Marc Lazerow, Brochin's campaign manager, said he found Maryland Commissioner of Labor and Industry J. Ronald DeJuliis and two other men in the midst of tearing down four Brochin campaign signs near a busy intersection Saturday afternoon. Connie DeJuliis, DeJuliis's wife and Brochin's opponent in the Democratic primary, said Sunday her husband had permission from the owner of the property to put up her campaign signs and that her husband thought Brochin's campaign signs had been placed there improperly.
NEWS
By Colin Campbell, The Baltimore Sun | March 27, 2014
Baltimore political consultant Julius Henson appealed Wednesday a Circuit Court ruling that he violated his probation by running for a state Senate seat. His lawyer said Henson's case is bolstered by Wednesday's ruling by the state Court of Special Appeals, which held that former Anne Arundel County Executive John Leopold could run for office during his probation for a misconduct conviction. In that case, the appeals court said that while judges have broad power to sentence, the Maryland Board of Elections has the ultimate power to determine who is eligible to run for office.
NEWS
By Adam Sachs and Adam Sachs,Sun Staff Writer | February 8, 1994
Democratic political activist James M. Kraft has decided to pursue his "initial desire" -- a run for state Senate instead of the House of Delegates seat for which he had geared his campaign for several months.Mr. Kraft said yesterday he decided to run for the Senate in District 12 -- which includes West Columbia, Elkridge and southwestern Baltimore County -- after Democratic Sen. Nancy L. Murphy recently announced her intention to run for Baltimore County executive rather than seek re-election.
NEWS
By Thomas W. Waldron and Thomas W. Waldron,SUN STAFF | December 4, 1997
Launching a new era in partisan politics in Maryland, the Democratic members of the state Senate raised about $500,000 at a Baltimore fund-raiser last night to help cement their hold on power in the State House in next year's elections.Several hundred people attended the event at the downtown Harbor Court Hotel, including business leaders, university officials and most of the State House lobbying corps.The 32 Democratic senators -- led by Senate President Thomas V. Mike Miller -- hope to raise as much as $1 million to help their party's incumbents and, in some cases, challengers to incumbent Republicans.
NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | March 14, 2014
Possession of small amounts of marijuana would be treated as a civil offense rather than a crime under a bill that passed the Senate Friday. The vote was 36 to 8. The measure now goes to the House of Delegates, where similar legislation last year failed to get out of committee. Under the bill, anyone caught with 10 grams or less of the drug would be issued a civil citation and fined up to $100. Juveniles would be required to appear in court and could be ordered into drug treatment, as could adults receiving their third citation.
NEWS
By Erin Cox, The Baltimore Sun | February 4, 2014
Maryland senators will resume debate Wednesday on whether to outlaw the sale of grain alcohol, a colorless spirit so potent the chamber voted to ban it twice before. More than a dozen other states already forbid the sale of the 190-proof liquor, according to state analysts. The proposal has died in the House of Delegates in the past, but was revived with a new lawmakers pushing it this year. On Tuesday, the Senate took up the question of whether its prevalence on college campuses contributed to alcohol poisoning, and whether banning it would hurt small businesses that sell it. Democrat Sen. Rich Madaleno of Montgomery County said the president of Frostburg State University asked him to introduce the bill to ban substance, which is nearly pure alcohol, because of the problems it creates at colleges.
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