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By Carol L. Bowers and Carol L. Bowers,Staff Writer | March 20, 1993
In her first run for office, Allison Cole set her sights realistically: She wanted to be the student representative on the Anne Arundel County school board.Instead, she quickly found herself in the race to be the voice for all Maryland students on the State Board of Education.Yesterday, she became the first student from her county to achieve that distinction."I'm excited. I can't wait to get to work," the 16-year-old junior from Severna Park High School said.Jane Doyle, a county school board spokeswoman, said an Anne Arundel student was a finalist for the nonvoting state post three years ago, "but we've never had a representative from this county make the final cut. She's quite an accomplished student."
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NEWS
October 4, 2014
State lawmakers and educators are right to be concerned about how much time it presently takes to clear or dismiss teachers accused of misconduct. When teachers are yanked out of their classrooms for months or even years while allegations of wrongdoing are investigated, both they and their students suffer from the absence. Maryland's school districts need to expedite the process by which such cases are resolved, but they must do so in a way that is fair to teachers while protecting the vulnerable young people entrusted to their care.
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NEWS
July 2, 1993
At least two lessons can be learned about Howard County based on test results from the Maryland School Performance Assessment Program.The first is that Howard appears to retain its position as having one of the best school systems in the state. Although officials are still working on a way of ranking school systems based on the tests, there is other evidence of Howard's success. More than half of the students in third, fifth and eighth grades scored in the top three levels of math, social studies and science.
SPORTS
By Louis Krauss and The Baltimore Sun | July 18, 2014
This time last year, fishing partners Ivan Koretic and Logan Kuhrmann, both of Essex, were preparing for The Bass Federation and Fishing League Worldwide Quad State High School Fishing Championship. This year's version will be significantly different. After being the only team from Maryland last year, Koretic and Kuhrmann, both 16, will be joined by a handful of Maryland teams Saturday in the second annual championship on the Chesapeake Bay. "It's great that there are some more Maryland teams ... this year," Koretic said.
NEWS
By Mark Bomster and Mark Bomster,Evening Sun Staff | December 19, 1990
Programs for adults, prisoners and disruptive youth could be cut in the current fiscal year, as state education officials look for ways to trim the state Education Department's budget.State School Superintendent Joseph L. Shilling said yesterday that the department will need to look at curtailing existing programs in light of the state's budget woes.But much of the state education budget consists of mandated programs, such as special education, vocational education and some local aid, which are off limits to cuts.
NEWS
By Lane Harvey Brown and Lane Harvey Brown,SUN STAFF | March 7, 2002
A Native American activist said yesterday that he would appeal to the state after the Harford County school board denied his appeal of a citizen group's decision to retain Indian mascots in three county schools. Richard Regan, a Montgomery County resident, said he received written notification Tuesday of the county Board of Education's decision. Regan appeared before the Harford board in January to appeal the panel's decision last fall to keep Indian mascots at Havre de Grace's elementary, middle and high schools.
NEWS
By Marego Athans and Marego Athans,SUN STAFF | February 25, 1998
Prodded by the threat of politicians dictating reading instruction, the state school board voted 9-1 yesterday to significantly strengthen reading training for Maryland's teachers.The proposal, to be debated at public hearings before a final vote tentatively set for June, would affect all 47,000 teachers as well as current and future college students headed for teaching careers.The new requirements would quadruple the number of reading courses required for elementary school teachers to become state certified, double the number of courses for middle and high school teachers, and include better training in phonics and the sounds that make up words.
NEWS
By Howard Libit and Howard Libit,SUN STAFF | October 25, 2000
Saying Maryland's school libraries need more aid, state Superintendent of Schools Nancy S. Grasmick announced yesterday she will seek to almost triple state spending on them next year. "This is a plan to start helping all of our schools reach the standards that we think are important," Grasmick said. Grasmick's proposal - developed during the past month and presented to the state school board - would bring state support for school libraries to $8.7 million at a time when fewer than one in five meet Maryland's standards for the minimum number of books and supplies.
NEWS
By Howard Libit and Howard Libit,SUN STAFF | October 26, 2000
High school students across Maryland might soon be able to earn credits toward graduation without setting foot in school buildings or classrooms. State educators took a major step yesterday toward creating virtual high school classrooms, agreeing to develop plans for Internet-based courses to be made available to all students. "This is certainly the wave of the future," said Nancy S. Grasmick, the state superintendent of schools. As early as next fall, some state-approved high school courses could be available through the Internet, and an array of classes could be online within the next three years.
NEWS
By Jean Thompson and Jean Thompson,SUN STAFF Sun staff writers Lyle Denniston, JoAnna Daemmrich, David Folkenflik and Peter Jensen contributed to this article | January 17, 1996
Working behind the scenes on a plan for joint control of Baltimore's ailing public schools, city and state negotiators feel strong pressure to reach agreement quickly so they can install a new school government by September."
SPORTS
By Matt Hamilton, The Baltimore Sun | May 18, 2014
Michael Duarte loves to lift weights and plays varsity baseball as a sophomore at Sparrows Point. Richie Martin is a self-proclaimed hamburger junkie who would rather hunt on Maryland's Eastern Shore than play sports for the Pointers. Despite their differences, the two teenagers set out together May 4 for a day on Dundee Creek in Gunpowder Falls State Park, sliding their white, 17-foot Ranger boat between two piers and into the murky brown water. Their chemistry was evident as soon as the boat hit the water.
NEWS
By Liz Bowie, The Baltimore Sun | March 25, 2014
A Maryland school superintendent wouldn't ordinarily give local systems a pass on the requirement that public school students go to school for 180 days a year. But these have not been ordinary times. The seemingly endless winter, with its unusual number of snow days, has raised the specter of students going to school into the last week of June. On Tuesday, the State Board of Education offered a way out. As light snow fell outside their meeting room, board members voted to give Superintendent Lillian Lowery the authority to waive up to five days of school this year for public schools and two days for private schools.
NEWS
By Liz Bowie and Erica L. Green, The Baltimore Sun | January 27, 2014
Delvond Grady disliked attending middle school at New Hope Academy so much, he began finding ways to get sent home. "I started to do stuff, mostly just being all kinds of disrespectful, on purpose, just to get suspended," said Delvond, now a ninth-grader at the Baltimore school. But the school's administrators decided they weren't going to let students like Delvond, who were being suspended for nonviolent offenses, take a few days off because they were bored. They changed their approach to discipline and have seen a precipitous drop in suspensions.
SPORTS
By Katherine Dunn and Nicholas Fouriezos and The Baltimore Sun | December 6, 2013
Class 1A No. 14 Douglass (13-0) vs. Fort Hill (13-0) When: Saturday, noon Where: M&T Bank Stadium TV: WNUV-54, WDCW-50 Coaches: Elwood Townsend, Douglass; Todd Appel, Fort Hill Outlook: Douglass, which won the first playoff game in school history this season, faces a team with a rich state tournament history. The Sentinels, from Cumberland, have been to the state final eight times and won their second title in 1997. In a classification dominated for the last decade by Dunbar, which moved up to Class 2A this year, the Ducks have relied on defense to reinforce their drive to the final.
NEWS
By Liz Bowie and By Liz Bowie | December 3, 2013
  Governor Martin O'Malley appointed Larry Giammo, a former Rockville mayor and director of a national non-profit, to the state school board Tuesday. Giammo fills a seat vacated by Ivan Walls, a Montgomery County doctor, who resigned a few months ago.  The appointment means the 12-member state board will continue to be dominated by five members from the Prince George's and Montgomery county area of the state. Two school board members are from Baltimore City, one is from Howard, and three are from the rural counties of Kent, Allegany and Calvert.  The board, which decides education policy for the state, also has one student member each year.
NEWS
October 16, 2013
Anybody who has ever encountered the college admissions process knows that there's no such thing as an even playing field. Most schools will admit that upfront. "Like all colleges," Harvard College notes on its own admissions web site, "we seek to admit the most interesting, able, and diverse class possible. " In other words, schools often try to balance out an incoming class with students who not only have good grades or high test scores but have had unusual life experiences as well as those they regard as "well rounded.
NEWS
By Erika Niedowski and Erika Niedowski,SUN STAFF | January 29, 2002
The Baltimore school system continued its slow but steady progress on state tests last year, posting its fifth straight increase and outgaining every other jurisdiction except one in Maryland. The percentage of city pupils meeting the standard on the Maryland School Performance Assessment Program exams rose 2 points, to 22.5. In every other school system in the metropolitan area, scores dropped, and the statewide average fell 1.6. Only Worcester County's gain was larger than Baltimore's.
NEWS
November 10, 1998
BY PROPOSING a comprehensive incentive package for teachers, state school Superintendent Nancy S. Grasmick has shown how Maryland can prevent an expected teacher shortage from becoming an acute crisis. The worst thing the governor and the General Assembly could now do is disregard her call for action. Early preventive measures are needed. Teacher-preparation programs nationwide are simply not producing enough graduates to fill the need created by rising enrollments and large numbers of teachers eligible to retire.
NEWS
By Liz Bowie, The Baltimore Sun | September 24, 2013
Maryland's state Board of Education said Tuesday that state testing will go forward as planned, despite calls from school district superintendents and the teachers union for a one-year moratorium. The state board voted 10-1 Tuesday to seek waivers from the U.S. Department of Education that would prevent double testing of students and place a one-year delay on the use of student test data to evaluate teachers' job performance. The state is also asking that its school accountability system be suspended for a year.
NEWS
By Joe Burris, The Baltimore Sun | July 25, 2013
Maryland schools Superintendent Lillian Lowery, a self-described optimist, had hoped students would excel on this year's state assessments because they were being taught under a more rigorous curriculum. Instead, test scores plunged. Lowery now says the new curriculum actually led to the decline, as tests weren't updated to match what students were learning. The poor showing on the Maryland School Assessment spurred calls this week for a moratorium on testing, and led to questions about student preparedness and whether the new curriculum was being made a scapegoat.
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