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By BONITA FORMWALT | June 22, 1994
She found me in the multipack candy aisle of Price Club unsuccessfully trying to balance a container of Strawberry Twizlers on top of a double carton of Fruit Loops.School was out for the summer, nutrition was out the window."Almost makes you appreciate that $1.10 lunch in the school cafeteria," she said with just a hint of sarcasm.We joined the line of other mothers waiting to check out."Do you have any special summer plans for the kids?" she asked.Mentally I reviewed my summer schedule.
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NEWS
January 17, 2014
Harford County Sen. Barry Glassman is accepting State Senatorial Scholarship applications until April 15. The State Senatorial Scholarship targets current high school seniors, full-time and part-time undergraduate and graduate degree-seeking individuals. The scholarship is open to individuals who are attending public or private institutions in Maryland. To qualify for the State Senatorial Scholarship, the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) must be submitted by March 1. The application for the Senatorial Scholarship can be found on http://www.BarryGlassman.com Return the completed application to: Senator Barry Glassman, 320 James Senate Office Building, Annapolis, MD 21401.
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NEWS
September 21, 1993
OVER many years, most of the things that are wrong with the Maryland legislative scholarship program have been cited in editorials on this page:It's a convenient form of patronage, especially for the senators, who handed out $5.6 million last year to constituents. (The House of Delegates program is much smaller: $1.4 million.)Because it's not based on need, scholarship distribution is arbitrary. Aid goes disproportionately to students attending a few expensive private colleges -- and to whites.
NEWS
By Sandy Alexander and Sandy Alexander,SUN STAFF | March 25, 2004
A bill introduced yesterday in the Maryland General Assembly seeks to help some of the hundreds of nursing students turned away from Maryland schools each year by allowing them to use a state scholarship at out-of-state schools. Rising interest in nursing careers has overwhelmed four-year schools and community colleges. School officials say they must turn away more than 400 applicants a year, largely because of a shortage of nursing faculty and limited clinical space. "We've done an excellent job of recruiting people to go into nursing," said Sen. Paula C. Hollinger, a Baltimore County Democrat who introduced the bill.
NEWS
June 27, 1991
The following students received awards and scholarships at the Severna Park High School graduation:Kimberly Aller, Presidential Scholarship; Megan Ambrose, Scholarship for Scholars Physical Education and Presidential Scholarship; Lisa Anderson, Severn River Lions Club, Severna Park Optimist, Ray Croc Student/Teacher, Maryland Distinguished Scholar, Panhellenic Club and National Guard Distinguished Scholar.Elizabeth Anderson, Soccer Scholarship North Carolina State; Ted Baeurla, Delaware Tech Athletic Scholarship; Jenny Banks, Yearbook; Mary Beth Belka, George Washington University Presidential Scholarshipand Senatorial Scholarship from Phil Jimeno; Tamara Bennett, Academic Scholarship from York.
NEWS
December 16, 1991
A Baltimore County lawmaker said he plans to sponsor a bill in the 1992 General Assembly that would end a House of Delegates program that currently allows members to hand out money for college scholarships based on their own criteria rather than on need.Del. Gerry Brewster, D-Baltimore County, said the bill would allow the State Scholarship Administration to award the money directly to students, instead of first to delegates, who then dole it out as patronage.Maryland is the only state in the nation that permits legislators to award scholarships to constituents, Brewster said.
NEWS
By Marina Sarris and Thomas Waldron and Marina Sarris and Thomas Waldron,Staff Writers Staff writer Mark Bomster contributed to this article | March 17, 1993
A proposal to take state legislators out of the business of awarding college scholarships enjoys the support of one-third of the Senate, with more than one-third undecided, a Sun survey found yesterday.The poll showed that 15 of the 47 senators would vote to turn the $7 million legislative scholarship fund over to state scholarship officials. Another 17 were undecided or unwilling to commit themselves publicly. Despite that, the full Senate may not get to vote on the matter unless reformers can round up votes from at least four of the five undecided members of a Senate panel that must consider the issue first.
NEWS
By Thomas W. Waldron and Thomas W. Waldron,Annapolis Bureau | February 9, 1992
ANNAPOLIS -- While Maryland legislators are cutting almost everything else this session, the odds are good they'll hold onto one of their most cherished political perks -- the $6.4 million scholarship fund they dole out to constituents.Despite attacks from critics, particularly in the Republican minority, the program is likely to survive as the only one of its kind in the nation -- one that gives each senator more than $100,000 a year to disburse with no oversight and few rules."Let's face it, if you've given out a scholarship to somebody, that person and that person's family will owe a certain debt to you," said Del. John S. Morgan, R-Howard, who received a senatorial scholarship in graduate school.
NEWS
By Thomas W. Waldron and Thomas W. Waldron,Staff Writer | August 23, 1992
In the scramble to pay fall tuition bills, many college students and their parents are making an unhappy discovery -- there isn't much money left to go around.With the economic slump forcing record numbers of students to apply for aid, several state colleges report an unprecedented demand.The University of Maryland at College Park scaled back the amount given to each needy student by hundreds of dollars. The rationing, intended to spread the money around to more people, means students will have to get by without frills such as new clothes or campus entertainment, said an official there.
NEWS
By Marina Sarris and Marina Sarris,Staff Writer | March 16, 1993
When it comes to their one-of-a-kind scholarship program, Maryland state legislators can't "win for losing," Sen. Leo E. Green complained yesterday.First, the media keep beating them up over the $7 million program by calling it a perk of political office, the senator said.Second, reporters keep singling out -- unfairly in his view -- those cases in which senators award college scholarships to the children of campaign workers, party officials and wealthy constituents.Mr. Green, D-Prince George's, was trying to persuade the Senate Economic and Environmental Affairs Committee to pass his bill reforming the scholarship program.
NEWS
By KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | February 26, 2004
WASHINGTON - The U.S. Supreme Court made a bold statement yesterday for the separation of church and state, ruling that states may deny public scholarship money to students seeking religious training. In a surprisingly strong 7-2 opinion written by Chief Justice William H. Rehnquist, the court said that while the First Amendment doesn't always prohibit public funding of religious education, it also does not compel states to fund such education. Washington state, which denied a merit-based state scholarship to a student who wanted to become a minister, was perfectly in its rights to do so, the justices said.
NEWS
By David G. Savage and David G. Savage,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | May 20, 2003
WASHINGTON - The Supreme Court took up a case yesterday that will test how far the government can go in funding religion, agreeing to decide whether states that give college scholarships must pay for a student's training to become a cleric. The outcome could redraw the line that separates church and state in education. Last year, the justices said states may subsidize children to attend religious schools through a voucher program. The 5-4 ruling said this taxpayer money for church schools did not violate the First Amendment's ban on an "establishment of religion."
NEWS
By Stephen Kiehl and Stephen Kiehl,SUN STAFF | January 17, 2002
For a change, Annapolis High School teacher Kevin Schiavone stood in front of the General Assembly and the governor yesterday instead of a classroom full of kids. The lawmakers, he said, were a little less raucous. They gave him a standing ovation. Schiavone, 29, was in the first class of Marylanders to receive the state's HOPE Teacher Scholarship. Gov. Parris N. Glendening singled him out yesterday during his State of the State address as an example of the impact of state scholarship programs.
NEWS
By Michael Hill and Michael Hill,SUN STAFF | January 20, 2000
In a step toward awarding every B student $3,000 a year for college, Gov. Parris Glendening's budget kicks off Maryland's Hope scholarship program, making grants available to those majoring in business management, public affairs and the health professions. The Hope program, announced last year, will enlarge upon the current science and technology and teacher education scholarships that fund about 1,400 students -- Maryland residents who graduate from high school with a B average and maintain that grade level in college.
NEWS
By Michael Hill and Michael Hill,SUN STAFF | August 16, 1999
The state's Science and Technology Scholarship program has come under criticism from one of the schools it is supposed to benefit -- the Johns Hopkins University, where officials say it could end up costing students money."
NEWS
March 7, 1998
MARYLAND legislators should support Gov. Parris N. Glendening's proposed science and technology scholarship program because it has a targeted purpose that is not merely altruistic: the cultivation of a qualified work force so high-tech companies will not move out of state in search of employees.The lack of such workers is a serious problem for Maryland companies.At a recent hearing before state lawmakers in Annapolis, business leaders said some 20,000 well-paying, high-tech jobs are vacant because so few college students are pursuing engineering, science and computer degrees.
NEWS
April 7, 1994
Politicians who wonder why the public has such a low opinion of them should turn their attention to the Maryland Senate, where two "princes" of that body have been playing the sort of undemocratic games Machiavelli himself would have cheered.The issue is the legislative scholarship scam: Lawmakers dispense patronage and purchase political good will by awarding millions of taxpayer dollars to children of associates, friends and relatives. Efforts to reform this shameful program gathered momentum last year, winning wide support in the House but stalling in the Senate.
NEWS
By Larry Carson and Larry Carson,Staff Writer | October 7, 1992
Saying he no longer has hope that the Maryland General Assembly will give up the power to distribute millions of dollars in state scholarships, Del. Gerry Brewster has decided to relinquish his own power to distribute the funds.The Baltimore County Democrat has asked the State Scholarship Administration to award his share of the scholarship money to students in his district on the basis of need. Each state delegate is given $41,712 in scholarship money to disburse over a four-year period.
NEWS
By Rosalie Falter and Rosalie Falter,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | February 15, 1998
FIFTY COMPUTER students from North County High School and the Center for Applied Technology North listened intently Monday as Gov. Parris N. Glendening outlined plans for a Maryland Science and Technology scholarship program that could make it easier for them to go to college."
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