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NEWS
March 11, 2013
Here's a quiz for all current and future college students and their families: Which of the following has risen in price the most sharply over the last several decades - tuition, health care, the consumer price index or textbooks? For the correct answer, please consult the back of your texts. Since 1978, the cost of college textbooks has risen 812 percent, according to the American Enterprise Institute. Few necessities can match that kind of price explosion. In 2011, the cost of college texts rose 8 percent, or more than four times the rate of inflation, according to U.S. Labor Department statistics.
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NEWS
By Amanda Yeager, ayeager@tribune.com | December 20, 2013
The second Republican to file in Howard and Baltimore counties' District 12 says he's the candidate for voters interested in small government and individual freedoms. "People should be able to do what they want, as long as they're not hurting anyone else," Gordon Bull said of his political stance. "I'm not into trying to control people, their lives or their decisions. " Bull, 32, called himself "a liberty-minded Republican" interested in bringing government "a lot closer to the people.
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NEWS
By Howard Libit and Howard Libit,SUN STAFF | April 8, 2002
If Maryland lawmakers thought approving a new school funding formula was difficult, just wait until they have to find the $1.3 billion to pay for it. Legalizing slot machines, raising the sales tax and taxing more services are being mentioned as potential sources of dollars for the Thornton Commission plan, which was given final approval during the weekend by the General Assembly. The legislation calls for large increases in state aid for schools over the next six years - but includes money to pay only for the first two. "We will take a hard look at the money, a hard look at the revenue structure of this state," said House Speaker Casper R. Taylor Jr., an Allegany County Democrat.
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella, The Baltimore Sun | October 23, 2013
When Amazon.com opens a huge distribution center next year in Southeast Baltimore, consumers across the state who buy books, electronics, toys or anything else from the online seller will no longer be able to avoid the state's 6 percent sales tax. Consumers might not like it, but that's just fine with many retailers in Maryland, who say the online giant enjoyed that competitive advantage for too long. Seattle-based Amazon announced plans Tuesday to open a 1 million-square-foot warehouse that will employ 1,000 full-time workers at the site of the former General Motors plan on Broening Highway, a move welcomed by city and state officials.
NEWS
October 30, 2011
My wife and I are both over 65 and we have found it too expensive to continue living in Maryland. We have purchased a new home in a 55 and over community in Delaware where the property taxes will be one-third what we pay in Baltimore County. Other costs such as car tags and license fees are also lower, and there is no state sales tax at all. We have met other people from Maryland who have bought homes in Delaware, and we all basically left or are leaving for the same reasons.
NEWS
August 15, 2013
By most accounts, Maryland Tax-Free Week has been a good way for shoppers to get a limited break from Maryland's 6 percent sales tax. Timed to coincide with back-to-school shopping in August, shoppers don't have to pay state sales tax when buying most apparel and footwear items under $100. It's a well-timed break for parents and an added boost for retailers. This year's tax-free week ends Saturday. And while any break from the state's regressive sales tax is a welcome relief, limiting the tax holiday to just clothing is too narrow, especially if the goal is to help parents financially as their children return to school.
NEWS
August 24, 2011
In his commentary ("GOP: Tax the poor, protect the rich" Aug. 21), Dan Rodricks indicates that Republicans are saying that it may be time to tax the poor. We are already taxing the poor in Maryland. The state sales tax was raised, and the tax on beer was raised. These are taxes that are paid by everyone, but they hurt the poor more than the wealthy people. Gov. O'Malley now wants to raise the gas tax, and that again will hurt the poor the most. The Democrats control the Maryland House and Senate.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | January 11, 2013
A plan proposed by Virginia's governor to raise transportation revenue while scrapping the gas tax is largely based on "wishful thinking," the chief policy analyst for the Maryland General Assembly has concluded. "It is hoped that Maryland can do better," Warren G. Deschenaux said in a letter to legislative leaders. Deschenaux said Gov. Bob McDonnell's plan to raise almost $3.2 billion for transportation over five years depends in large part on transfers from other programs and a revenue stream that Congress has not yet allowed the states to tap. The Virginia proposal attracted considerable interest in Annapolis after McDonnell unveiled it Tuesday because Maryland faces a similar shortfall in transportation revenue. Though he did not endorse McDonnell's plan, Gov. Martin O'Malley said he agreed with certain aspects of it -- especially a move away from reliance on the conventional center-per-gallon gas tax. Deschenaux told legislative leaders he reviewed the Virginia proposal because of Maryland's "great interest" in transportation funding.
EXPLORE
February 2, 2012
In the not so distant aftermath of the most recent penny per dollar increase in state sales tax and any number of hikes in fees prior to that, a new gas tax, or any other state tax increase this year, is an insult to the people of Maryland. Since before Robert L. Ehrlich Jr. became governor, state officials have been talking about a $1 billion dollar structural deficit, as if it were insurmountable. A billion dollars is a lot of money, but it's a scant 1/36th of the state's $36 billion budget.
NEWS
Editorial from The Aegis | August 15, 2013
There's still time, if you're reading this on publication day, to take advantage of the waning hours of Shop Maryland Week, the seven days when purchases can be made without having to pay state sales tax. It's promoted as a way for parents to save a few dollars when they're doing back to school shopping, so not everything is sold tax-free. Importantly, individual items costing more than $100 are taxed at the usual rate of 6 percent. Beyond that, figuring out which items are taxed and which are not is kind of hit and miss.
NEWS
Editorial from The Aegis | August 15, 2013
There's still time, if you're reading this on publication day, to take advantage of the waning hours of Shop Maryland Week, the seven days when purchases can be made without having to pay state sales tax. It's promoted as a way for parents to save a few dollars when they're doing back to school shopping, so not everything is sold tax-free. Importantly, individual items costing more than $100 are taxed at the usual rate of 6 percent. Beyond that, figuring out which items are taxed and which are not is kind of hit and miss.
NEWS
August 15, 2013
By most accounts, Maryland Tax-Free Week has been a good way for shoppers to get a limited break from Maryland's 6 percent sales tax. Timed to coincide with back-to-school shopping in August, shoppers don't have to pay state sales tax when buying most apparel and footwear items under $100. It's a well-timed break for parents and an added boost for retailers. This year's tax-free week ends Saturday. And while any break from the state's regressive sales tax is a welcome relief, limiting the tax holiday to just clothing is too narrow, especially if the goal is to help parents financially as their children return to school.
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella, The Baltimore Sun | August 9, 2013
Organizers of Maryland's tax-free shopping week are aiming to give back-to-school buying in August the kind of boost that Black Friday gives to holiday spending each fall. Now in its fourth year, the annual tax holiday gives consumers a break on the state's 6 percent sales tax on most apparel and footwear priced up to $100. The week runs Sunday through next Saturday. The breaks have drawn criticism, principally because the state stands to forgo an estimated $5 million in tax revenue.
NEWS
March 11, 2013
Here's a quiz for all current and future college students and their families: Which of the following has risen in price the most sharply over the last several decades - tuition, health care, the consumer price index or textbooks? For the correct answer, please consult the back of your texts. Since 1978, the cost of college textbooks has risen 812 percent, according to the American Enterprise Institute. Few necessities can match that kind of price explosion. In 2011, the cost of college texts rose 8 percent, or more than four times the rate of inflation, according to U.S. Labor Department statistics.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | January 11, 2013
A plan proposed by Virginia's governor to raise transportation revenue while scrapping the gas tax is largely based on "wishful thinking," the chief policy analyst for the Maryland General Assembly has concluded. "It is hoped that Maryland can do better," Warren G. Deschenaux said in a letter to legislative leaders. Deschenaux said Gov. Bob McDonnell's plan to raise almost $3.2 billion for transportation over five years depends in large part on transfers from other programs and a revenue stream that Congress has not yet allowed the states to tap. The Virginia proposal attracted considerable interest in Annapolis after McDonnell unveiled it Tuesday because Maryland faces a similar shortfall in transportation revenue. Though he did not endorse McDonnell's plan, Gov. Martin O'Malley said he agreed with certain aspects of it -- especially a move away from reliance on the conventional center-per-gallon gas tax. Deschenaux told legislative leaders he reviewed the Virginia proposal because of Maryland's "great interest" in transportation funding.
NEWS
August 27, 2012
Sen. Ben Cardin and Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake recently wrote an opinion piece in these pages regarding Baltimore's failing infrastructure. As Senator Cardin's opponent in the November election, I wanted to take this opportunity to address the real problem facing our state and federal infrastructure. Both at the national level and within the state of Maryland, we are struggling to close massive structural deficits due to years of budget mismanagement and inefficient government spending.
NEWS
September 11, 2008
Internet tax break costs state millions Jay Hancock's column "What's behind shortfall in state's taxes? Try smuggling" (Sept. 3) touched on an important tax policy issue facing state governments across the nation and in Maryland. For several years, Congress has debated the application of state sales taxes on goods purchased via the Internet. Unfortunately, little action has resulted from this debate. National estimates indicate that states will lose $21 billion to $34 billion in uncollected taxes for purchases made over the Internet that are exempt from state sales tax. For Maryland, collecting sales tax on all Internet purchases could yield revenue increases in the hundreds of millions of dollars, money the state sorely needs to bring its budget into balance given the lagging condition of our economy and continued structural deficit.
NEWS
February 27, 1991
In the thick of Maryland's budget conundrum comes a simple statement of common sense from the chairman of the House Appropriations Committee: We don't have the time to look at the trees now, Buzz Ryan told colleagues, we have to look at the forest. Indeed, lawmakers' attempts to hit a moving budget target have put the process behind schedule. But all the bantering and horse-trading over budget cuts, furloughs and layoffs misses the larger point: What kind of state do Marylanders want to live in?
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella, The Baltimore Sun | August 8, 2012
After two years of enjoying a break on the state sales tax every August, many Maryland consumers now plan theirback-to-schoolshopping around the weeklong event. That's one measure of the success of Maryland's Tax Free Week, which will mark its third year when it begins Sunday, state and retail industry officials said. During the tax holiday, which runs until midnight Aug. 18, consumers won't be charged the state's 6 percent sales tax on most clothing and footwear priced under $100.
EXPLORE
February 2, 2012
In the not so distant aftermath of the most recent penny per dollar increase in state sales tax and any number of hikes in fees prior to that, a new gas tax, or any other state tax increase this year, is an insult to the people of Maryland. Since before Robert L. Ehrlich Jr. became governor, state officials have been talking about a $1 billion dollar structural deficit, as if it were insurmountable. A billion dollars is a lot of money, but it's a scant 1/36th of the state's $36 billion budget.
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