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By William F. Zorzi Jr. and William F. Zorzi Jr.,SUN STAFF | October 5, 1997
The Maryland secretary of state's office -- a tiny agency that deals almost exclusively with the little-known functions of government -- has emerged as a quasi-political arm of the executive branch under Gov. Parris N. Glendening.On paper, the office is charged with obscure duties that range from attesting to the governor's signature and keeping the Great Seal of Maryland to registering trademarks and policing charities.But under Secretary of State John T. Willis, Glendening's close friend and chief political adviser, the office is used in an increasingly visible way to advance the governor's agenda and maintain links to political and community leaders around the state.
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NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | October 9, 2005
BERKELEY, CALIF. // Until recently, Dr. Kenneth Matsumura's most notable achievement was inventing an artificial liver that makes use of live rabbit cells suspended in solution. He says he also has a patent on a wristwatch that sounds an alarm before the wearer has a heart attack. But on Friday, Matsumura showed up at Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger's office in Sacramento and delivered a formal notice of a recall against the governor. Now Matsumura, a 60-year-old physician from Berkeley, is being depicted as the Terminator's terminator among Schwarzenegger's partisan detractors.
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NEWS
By Sandra McKee and Sandra McKee,SUN STAFF | October 10, 1996
RANDLEMAN, N.C. -- As the long white bus with the words "Richard Petty for Secretary of State" in blue script on its sides rolls to a halt, there is no one to be seen in Bunn, N.C. But when Richard Petty emerges onto the street, this town of 364 residents suddenly is alive.Folks emerge from every doorway. Cars and trucks pull to the curb. People rush toward the candidate, a slim man dressed in jeans, sport jacket, black felt cowboy hat and dark sunglasses. After signing napkins, wallets and shirts, he inches farther down the street, leaving Rhonda Cox enthralled.
NEWS
By Tim Craig and Tim Craig,SUN STAFF | May 10, 2003
Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr. is considering merging the state board of elections into the office of the secretary of state, a move that would give the Republican administration more control over the election process. The state Department of Budget and Management has compiled a 15-page, internal report outlining how Maryland would save more than $600,000 a year if the independent elections board was placed under the control of the secretary of state, who is appointed by the governor. "An independent agency is not necessary for states to provide a well-managed election process," says the report, a copy of which was obtained by The Sun. "Consolidation will offer the opportunity to realize cost savings and potentially increase the visibility and importance of the Office of Secretary of State."
NEWS
By Tim Craig and Tim Craig,SUN STAFF | May 10, 2003
Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr. is considering merging the state board of elections into the office of the secretary of state, a move that would give the Republican administration more control over the election process. The state Department of Budget and Management has compiled a 15-page, internal report outlining how Maryland would save more than $600,000 a year if the independent elections board was placed under the control of the secretary of state, who is appointed by the governor. "An independent agency is not necessary for states to provide a well-managed election process," says the report, a copy of which was obtained by The Sun. "Consolidation will offer the opportunity to realize cost savings and potentially increase the visibility and importance of the Office of Secretary of State."
NEWS
By Laura Lippman | November 24, 1991
The polite young man at your front door wants a donation for the Orphans and Widows of Law Officers Campaign.The honey-voiced woman at the other end of your telephone is soliciting funds for the Fully United Way of Homeless People.The Santa Claus ringing a bell on the corner asks that you give to the Good Army of Salvation.They all sound like good causes. Some of the names even sound vaguely familiar. But people who want to avoid holiday scams need to ask questions before they give, warns the Maryland Secretary of State's Office.
ENTERTAINMENT
By KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | August 27, 2001
Go to your search engine. Type in "e-therapy." Get overwhelmed. Thanks to Web sites like ABCs of Internet Therapy and Find-A-Therapist.com, some of the guesswork is eliminated. The former offers a directory that rates e-therapists by credentials, fees, payment options and services, while the latter suggests you do your homework and trust your gut feeling before revealing your life story to a screen name. If you can't meet face-to-face for at least the first visit, request an initial phone conversation.
NEWS
By Candus Thomson and Candus Thomson,SUN STAFF | December 24, 1997
Warm holiday feelings, a good economy and the allure of a tax deduction make this the season when many Marylanders write checks to charity.But in their haste to do good, some donors are taken by the generic sob stories of organizations that do not measure up to standards set by government and private watchdogs.With charity giving a $150 billion industry -- almost $3 billion of it generated in Maryland -- those who police the nonprofit organizations say it is important to choose wisely from among the dozens of appeals that come in the mail and by phone.
NEWS
By Laura Lippman and Laura Lippman,Sun Staff Writer | May 29, 1994
In Baltimore, when someone has something to give -- a Thanksgiving turkey, money from a school bake sale, a truckload of shoes -- Bea Gaddy is the likely recipient.This 61-year-old woman, known as the "Mother Teresa of Baltimore," has made her name the stamp of approval for local fund-raisers. She also made herself famous, showing up everywhere from the "CBS Morning News" to the "Jenny Jones" talk show. Billboards with her likeness are expected to go up around town soon.Just last month, Ms. Gaddy was inducted into the African-American Hall of Fame in Atlanta.
NEWS
By Laura Lippman and Laura Lippman,Staff Writer | October 7, 1992
The Sun reported incorrectly Oct. 7 that five charities had been barred by the secretary of state from raising funds in Maryland. In fact, three of the charities are legally entitled to solicit here. They are People Against Child Abuse, World Emergency Relief and the John F. Kennedy Library Foundation Inc.The Sun regrets the error.The Cancer Fund of America is back in Maryland, raising funds in a direct mail campaign that the state two years ago challenged in court as deceptive and misleading.
ENTERTAINMENT
By KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | August 27, 2001
Go to your search engine. Type in "e-therapy." Get overwhelmed. Thanks to Web sites like ABCs of Internet Therapy and Find-A-Therapist.com, some of the guesswork is eliminated. The former offers a directory that rates e-therapists by credentials, fees, payment options and services, while the latter suggests you do your homework and trust your gut feeling before revealing your life story to a screen name. If you can't meet face-to-face for at least the first visit, request an initial phone conversation.
NEWS
By Candus Thomson and Candus Thomson,SUN STAFF | December 24, 1997
Warm holiday feelings, a good economy and the allure of a tax deduction make this the season when many Marylanders write checks to charity.But in their haste to do good, some donors are taken by the generic sob stories of organizations that do not measure up to standards set by government and private watchdogs.With charity giving a $150 billion industry -- almost $3 billion of it generated in Maryland -- those who police the nonprofit organizations say it is important to choose wisely from among the dozens of appeals that come in the mail and by phone.
NEWS
By William F. Zorzi Jr. and William F. Zorzi Jr.,SUN STAFF | October 5, 1997
The Maryland secretary of state's office -- a tiny agency that deals almost exclusively with the little-known functions of government -- has emerged as a quasi-political arm of the executive branch under Gov. Parris N. Glendening.On paper, the office is charged with obscure duties that range from attesting to the governor's signature and keeping the Great Seal of Maryland to registering trademarks and policing charities.But under Secretary of State John T. Willis, Glendening's close friend and chief political adviser, the office is used in an increasingly visible way to advance the governor's agenda and maintain links to political and community leaders around the state.
NEWS
By Thomas W. Waldron and Thomas W. Waldron,SUN STAFF | December 18, 1996
On government time and stationery, a state employee wrote Eastern Shore ministers this month urging them to publicize Gov. Parris N. Glendening's "courageous" stand against casino-style gambling in Maryland."
NEWS
By Sandra McKee and Sandra McKee,SUN STAFF | October 10, 1996
RANDLEMAN, N.C. -- As the long white bus with the words "Richard Petty for Secretary of State" in blue script on its sides rolls to a halt, there is no one to be seen in Bunn, N.C. But when Richard Petty emerges onto the street, this town of 364 residents suddenly is alive.Folks emerge from every doorway. Cars and trucks pull to the curb. People rush toward the candidate, a slim man dressed in jeans, sport jacket, black felt cowboy hat and dark sunglasses. After signing napkins, wallets and shirts, he inches farther down the street, leaving Rhonda Cox enthralled.
NEWS
By Laura Lippman and Laura Lippman,Sun Staff Writer | May 29, 1994
In Baltimore, when someone has something to give -- a Thanksgiving turkey, money from a school bake sale, a truckload of shoes -- Bea Gaddy is the likely recipient.This 61-year-old woman, known as the "Mother Teresa of Baltimore," has made her name the stamp of approval for local fund-raisers. She also made herself famous, showing up everywhere from the "CBS Morning News" to the "Jenny Jones" talk show. Billboards with her likeness are expected to go up around town soon.Just last month, Ms. Gaddy was inducted into the African-American Hall of Fame in Atlanta.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | October 9, 2005
BERKELEY, CALIF. // Until recently, Dr. Kenneth Matsumura's most notable achievement was inventing an artificial liver that makes use of live rabbit cells suspended in solution. He says he also has a patent on a wristwatch that sounds an alarm before the wearer has a heart attack. But on Friday, Matsumura showed up at Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger's office in Sacramento and delivered a formal notice of a recall against the governor. Now Matsumura, a 60-year-old physician from Berkeley, is being depicted as the Terminator's terminator among Schwarzenegger's partisan detractors.
NEWS
June 14, 1991
On Flag Day, Gov. William Donald Schaefer is reminding all Marylanders to care for and display Maryland flags in the proper fashion.In January 1989, the governor established a Commission on Protocol forthe Maryland state flag. The panel produced a formal Maryland state flag protocol.Secretary of State Winfield M. Kelly Jr., chairman of the commission, offers a few tips to ensure that the Maryland flag is displayed and treated with the proper respect:* The Maryland flag should always be raised briskly and lowered slowly and ceremoniously.
NEWS
By Laura Lippman and Laura Lippman,Staff Writer | October 7, 1992
The Sun reported incorrectly Oct. 7 that five charities had been barred by the secretary of state from raising funds in Maryland. In fact, three of the charities are legally entitled to solicit here. They are People Against Child Abuse, World Emergency Relief and the John F. Kennedy Library Foundation Inc.The Sun regrets the error.The Cancer Fund of America is back in Maryland, raising funds in a direct mail campaign that the state two years ago challenged in court as deceptive and misleading.
NEWS
By Laura Lippman | November 24, 1991
The polite young man at your front door wants a donation for the Orphans and Widows of Law Officers Campaign.The honey-voiced woman at the other end of your telephone is soliciting funds for the Fully United Way of Homeless People.The Santa Claus ringing a bell on the corner asks that you give to the Good Army of Salvation.They all sound like good causes. Some of the names even sound vaguely familiar. But people who want to avoid holiday scams need to ask questions before they give, warns the Maryland Secretary of State's Office.
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