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By Tyeesha Dixon and Tyeesha Dixon,Sun reporter | May 14, 2008
Howard County State's Attorney Dario Broccolino announced yesterday the appointment of Mary V. Murphy as deputy state's attorney. Murphy, 43, will replace Broccolino, who was promoted to state's attorney last month. He replaced Timothy McCrone, who was named a Circuit Court judge in December. Murphy, who has worked as a Howard County assistant state's attorney since 1991, is the first woman to be named deputy, said Wayne Kirwan, Broccolino's spokesman. The only female state's attorney in Howard County was Marna McClendon, who served two four-year terms starting in 1994.
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NEWS
By Maria Archangelo and Maria Archangelo,Staff writer | October 27, 1991
In the past four years, Jill Trivas has prosecuted a murder case, several assaults and batteries, some thefts and many drunken drivers.Now she is moving across the aisle.Trivas, a Carroll assistant state's attorney since August 1987, handled her final county case Tuesday. She starts a new job as a Baltimore public defender Nov. 6.While the change might seem drastic to some, Trivas says she does not expect it to be too difficult."People ask, 'How can you defend someone if you know they are guilty?
NEWS
By Darren M. Allen and Darren M. Allen,Sun Staff Writer | January 4, 1995
In a homecoming of sorts, Jerry F. Barnes was sworn in yesterday as Carroll's state's attorney, officially replacing the five-term incumbent who gave him his first job in law and was his mentor and close friend.But for most of the lawyers who worked in the office under Thomas E. Hickman -- many of whom Mr. Barnes still refers to as friends -- the transfer of power looked more like an eviction.Since Carroll voters overwhelmingly placed Mr. Barnes in the prosecutor's office Nov. 8, seven of the 11 assistant state's attorneys have quit, been fired, or asked to resign, many of them in the past two weeks.
NEWS
By Lisa Respers and Lisa Respers,SUN STAFF | November 14, 1999
It's hard to keep up with Mimi Cooper.For the past few years, the 37-year-old Cooper has juggled her career as a Harford County prosecutor and crime prevention official with the demands of a young family. Last week, she took on a new role: that of Judge Cooper."It feels good," Cooper said after spending a day on the bench observing cases handled by District Court Judge Emory A. Plitt Jr., part of the training that will prepare her for full-time judicial duties. "I'm really excited."Her appointment to the Harford County bench last month by Gov. Parris N. Glendening is the culmination of more than a decade of work by the University of Baltimore Law School alumna, who set her sights on the legal profession after working as a legal aid volunteer while an undergraduate.
NEWS
By Dennis O'Brien and Dennis O'Brien,Sun Staff Writer | May 18, 1995
Twenty-nine professional employees of the Anne Arundel County state's attorney's office will attend an overnight retreat this weekend in Port Deposit.The retreat at the Donaldson Brown Center will cost $2,900, or $100 for each participant, said Kristin Riggin, an office spokeswoman. She said the retreat is intended as a strategic planning session and will be paid for from the office's $4,000 annual budget for staff meetings and training."The focus is going to be how can we make certain aspects of the office work better and how can we better serve the public," she said.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | August 12, 2005
Edwin H. W. Harlan Jr., a retired Harford County District Court judge and former state's attorney, died Tuesday of Alzheimer's disease at Charlestown Retirement Community in Catonsville. He was 84. Born and raised in Bel Air, Judge Harlan had descended from a Harford County family involved in the law. His father was a Bel Air attorney and his grandfather had been a Harford County judge. After graduating in 1940 from Episcopal High School in Alexandria, Va., he enrolled at Washington & Lee University in Lexington, Va., where he completed his freshman year before enlisting in the Army in 1942.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel and Andrea F. Siegel,andrea.siegel@baltsun.com | December 13, 2009
Six lawyers, two of them career criminal prosecutors and one a former judge who lost a previous election, will be considered to replace a judge who retired last summer from the Anne Arundel County Circuit Court bench. Sixteen people applied, and the Judicial Nominating Commission for the county winnowed the applicants down last week. Gov. Martin O'Malley must appoint someone from the panel's list, though he can also reopen the process to generate a new list. Whoever is appointed will have a short time on the job before needing to win election next year to keep it, provided the appointment is made before the filing deadline in July for November's election.
NEWS
By Fred Rasmussen and Fred Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | April 24, 1996
Jean Stovall Anderson, who during her 30-year career as a receptionist in the Baltimore City state's attorney's office became a trusted friend of judges, lawyers and crime victims, died Thursday of cancer at Greater Baltimore Medical Center. She was 71.Mrs. Anderson was the first black female to work in the Baltimore state's attorney's office, according to Judge Charles E. Moylan of the Maryland Court of Special Appeals, who as the city's top prosecutor hired her in 1966.At the time of her death, she was assigned to the victims' services unit.
NEWS
By Tyrone Richardson and Tyrone Richardson,sun reporter | April 4, 2007
Longtime Senior Assistant State's Attorney Michael D. Rexroad arrived at Howard County Circuit Court last week for what he thought was a routine show-cause hearing. But he quickly found that the hearing was a ploy to lure him to Courtroom 1 for a surprise sendoff Thursday to mark his retirement after more than 28 years with the state's attorney's office. He told the assembled judges, prosecutors, public defenders and court staff that he pleaded guilty to retirement on condition that he will spend it relaxing and teaching at the University of Baltimore Law School, his alma mater.
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