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By Kate Shatzkin and Kate Shatzkin,Sun Staff Writer | June 2, 1995
The director of the community services division for the Baltimore City State's Attorney's office turned himself in to police last night after a warrant was issued charging him with sexual abuse of a relative.Donald Todd, 39, of the 1700 block of Lakeside Ave. surrendered to police detectives at 6:10 p.m. at the state's attorney's office on charges of sexual child abuse, third-degree sex offense, fourth-degree sex offense and battery, said a Baltimore police spokesman, Sam Ringgold.Mr. Todd was booked into the men's lockup at the Central District, where he was awaiting an appearance before a court commissioner, Mr. Ringgold said.
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NEWS
By JACQUES KELLY and JACQUES KELLY,SUN REPORTER | April 26, 2006
Judge Stephanie L. Royster, a top criminal prosecutor in the Baltimore state's attorney's office who was appointed to the city Circuit Court in November, died of cancer Monday at Gilchrist Center for Hospice Care. The West Baltimore resident was 45. She had been chief of staff for the state's attorney's office, supervising more than 400 employees, when she was named to the bench. She had formerly been senior prosecutor in the homicide division. "She had a presence in the courtroom and a sensitivity that jurors trusted," State's Attorney Patricia C. Jessamy said yesterday.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,SUN STAFF | November 25, 1998
Ellicott City attorney Constantine James "Kit" Sfekas, 45, was named to the Howard County District Court yesterday by Gov. Parris N. Glendening.Glendening also appointed eight other judges yesterday in Baltimore City and Baltimore, Prince George's, St. Mary's and Frederick counties.Sfekas, who has practiced law in Howard County since 1991, becomes Howard's fifth district judge."I was elated. I got in the car, drove home, and my wife and daughters and I went out and had dinner," Sfekas said last night.
NEWS
By Dan Rodricks | June 5, 2002
I'VE SAID it before: There's a fine line between an outraged reformer who challenges the status quo and the whiner who keeps blaming others for his problems, and the toes of Martin O'Mayor's shiny shoes are right there on the line again. This week he's knocking the U.S. attorney for Maryland for not helping to fight crime here in the City of a Few Dozen Charms, and, being grateful for small favors, we happily note how Mr. O'Mayor this time resisted slamming a prosecutor with profane anger -- as he did the city state's attorney, Pat Jessamy, last year.
NEWS
By Alan J. Craver and Alan J. Craver,SUN STAFF | October 1, 1995
With the resignation of one of the county's top prosecutors, an assistant state's attorney who primarily handles drug cases has been promoted at the Howard state's attorney's office.Mary Murphy, a county prosecutor for about four years, will become one of three senior assistant state's attorneys Oct. 23, Howard State's Attorney Marna McLendon announced Friday."She's a very able attorney," Ms. McLendon said. "We believe she's a leader."Ms. Murphy, a 30-year-old Timonium resident, will replace Joseph Murtha, who resigned last week to become an associate with a private law firm in Baltimore.
NEWS
By Sheridan Lyons and Sheridan Lyons,SUN STAFF | December 19, 2001
Carroll County State's Attorney Jerry F. Barnes didn't want anyone wondering whether he wanted to run for a third term, so he plunked down his $25 filing fee nine months before the 2002 primary election. So far, the green vinyl binder at the county Board of Elections in Westminster contains two candidates for county offices - Barnes and a candidate for the Republican Central Committee. "I thought it would be a good idea to file early, so that there would be no question in anyone's mind as to my intentions in the future," the prosecutor said Monday.
NEWS
By Darren M. Allen and Darren M. Allen,Sun Staff Writer | August 31, 1994
A prominent Westminster defense attorney told police that Carroll State's Attorney Thomas E. Hickman drove at him as he walked along campaigning for Mr. Hickman's Republican primary election opponent.The prosecutor says that if he had tried to run him over, he wouldn't have missed.Stephen P. Bourexis -- whose relationship with the five-term prosecutor can most politely be called strained -- said that on Sunday, a brown Ford Bronco drove toward him, swerved and stopped in front of him, according to an incident report filed Monday with Maryland State Police by the defense attorney.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | August 12, 2005
Edwin H. W. Harlan Jr., a retired Harford County District Court judge and former state's attorney, died Tuesday of Alzheimer's disease at Charlestown Retirement Community in Catonsville. He was 84. Born and raised in Bel Air, Judge Harlan had descended from a Harford County family involved in the law. His father was a Bel Air attorney and his grandfather had been a Harford County judge. After graduating in 1940 from Episcopal High School in Alexandria, Va., he enrolled at Washington & Lee University in Lexington, Va., where he completed his freshman year before enlisting in the Army in 1942.
NEWS
October 11, 1993
The Anne Arundel County state's attorney's office under Frank Weathersbee has not exactly bolstered our faith in the justice system lately.Last month, a man charged with attempted murder went free thanks to a prosecutor not scheduling his trial fast enough. Judge Eugene M. Lerner was livid, but Mr. Weathersbee simply said of his assistant, "I'm not going to shoot him because he made a mistake." And last week, Assistant State's Attorney Gerald K. Anders (not the same prosecutor who made the scheduling goof)
NEWS
By Maria Archangelo and Maria Archangelo,Staff writer | October 27, 1991
In the past four years, Jill Trivas has prosecuted a murder case, several assaults and batteries, some thefts and many drunken drivers.Now she is moving across the aisle.Trivas, a Carroll assistant state's attorney since August 1987, handled her final county case Tuesday. She starts a new job as a Baltimore public defender Nov. 6.While the change might seem drastic to some, Trivas says she does not expect it to be too difficult."People ask, 'How can you defend someone if you know they are guilty?
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