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NEWS
March 21, 1994
Occasionally, we are left to wonder whether a case that came sealed in leak-proof Tupperware would be airtight enough for Anne Arundel County State's Attorney Frank Weathersbee.Mr. Weathersbee faces a difficult fight for re-election this fall, but that is largely his own fault. His history of non-aggressiveness makes him a perfect target for challengers who sense the public's thirst for get-tough justice.Inexplicably, he seems oblivious to this glaring vulnerability. One would think he would be trying to adopt a bolder persona, especially since Republican John Greiber, a tenacious bulldog of a candidate, started yapping at his heels.
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NEWS
October 30, 1994
I want to write to express my support for Tom Hickman and his staff in the state's attorney's office. People do not realize how much Tom has done on behalf of the children of Carroll County.Children have benefited from the collection efforts of the child support enforcement unit. Last year, $4.7 million was collected. Carroll County ranks number one in Maryland in its successful collection rate.The Child Abuse and Sexual Assault Unit developed by Tom Hickman has done wonders to protect our children.
NEWS
By Chris Guy and Chris Guy,SUN STAFF | October 27, 2000
EASTON - The Rev. Mike Maloney is accustomed to daily questions of good and evil, sin and punishment, right and wrong. The preacher has never given up his secular duty - first as an assistant state's attorney and now halfway through his third term as Dorchester County's top prosecutor. But on this night, Maloney is surrounded by a 20-member choir and cadre of evangelical ministers, musicians and soloists, all swaying in time to a gospel song as a dozen people, arms raised and palms turned heavenward, come forward to answer his call to be born again and receive a miracle.
NEWS
July 14, 1999
Prosecutor's office is open and effective and respects the lawAs the state's attorney for Baltimore, I have been and continue to be accessible and accountable. I attend community meetings, return telephone calls and respond to media and citizen inquiries. I am an honest, hardworking public servant who represents the citizens of Baltimore in a competent and responsible fashion.The Sun has interviewed me numerous times. I am the only individual in city government who has opened up her office and life to a Sun reporter.
NEWS
By Elaine Tassy and Elaine Tassy,SUN STAFF | January 22, 1996
After 21 years, Baltimore County State's Attorney Sandra A. O'Connor, the county's chief prosecutor, says she's nowhere near calling it quits."There are times when you go, 'Oh, gosh.' But never seriously," she says.This month, Mrs. O'Connor marks 21 years in her elected position. During that time, she has built such a strong prosecutorial reputation that no one will run against her. She created Maryland's first crime victim assistance unit and launched other innovations that have spread throughout the state.
NEWS
By Reginald Fields and Reginald Fields,SUN STAFF | January 31, 2003
Baltimore prosecutors say that city police botched an investigation and offered weak evidence to support child-abuse charges against a mother arrested this week for allegedly leaving her three children home alone for days. After being criticized by the attorney's office, police officials yesterday confirmed making mistakes in the investigation and said they have launched a follow-up inquiry to justify the charges. Neither prosecutors nor police, however, went so far as to say that charges would be dropped against 22-year-old Tiffany Simmons of the 900 block of Gilmor Street in West Baltimore.
NEWS
By Allison Klein and Allison Klein,SUN STAFF | August 25, 2002
Patricia C. Jessamy, the first woman to become Baltimore state's attorney, faces her first stiff competition for the job in the 7 1/2 years she has held the office. Jessamy adamantly says she has helped to reduce crime, and dismisses criticism that her office has fumbled important cases and allowed criminals to go free. "They don't know where the office was when I became state's attorney," Jessamy said of her critics, who have included Mayor Martin O'Malley. "This office is 1,000 percent better than it was when I got here."
NEWS
By Larry Carson and Larry Carson,Sun reporter | February 20, 2008
Four more candidates have submitted their names to be Howard County's next state's attorney: Domenic F. Iamele, 63, is a longtime Baltimore defense and personal injury attorney in practice with his son. He was an assistant state's attorney in Baltimore for five years in the early 1970s, according to his Web site. Gary Stewart Peklo, 61, who moved to the county in 1972, practices civil litigation, including wills, and some criminal law as a sole practitioner in Ellicott City, and was an assistant state's attorney in Howard County from 1975 to 1978, he said.
NEWS
By Darren M. Allen and Darren M. Allen,Staff Writer | December 17, 1993
Carroll State's Attorney Thomas E. Hickman filed the complaint that got Stephen P. Bourexis suspended from practicing law for six months, according to a report by the state Attorney Grievance Commission.Mr. Hickman also used his office to investigate financial misconduct allegations against the prominent Westminster defense attorney and pressed the commission to impose sanctions, the report said.The attorneys admit a strong dislike for each other, in the courtroom and out. The prosecutor has more than once called the defense attorney a liar; Mr. Bourexis has filed lawsuits -- and Attorney Grievance Commission complaints -- claiming Mr. Hickman misuses his office.
NEWS
By Elaine Tassy and Elaine Tassy,SUN STAFF | October 28, 1996
They are the lawyers in limbo on the ladder to litigation.Julie Marindin, Brian Thompson and Marc L. Zayon graduated from the University of Baltimore School of Law in December and passed the bar in June. They could find jobs at big firms, if they wanted.Instead, these doctors of jurisprudence earn $24,000 as law clerks in the Baltimore County state's attorney's office, waiting for prosecutors' jobs to open.The only full-fledged lawyers now working as law clerks for state prosecutors in the Baltimore metropolitan region, they routinely tote carts full of files down the hall, sit in court next to seasoned prosecutors, do research for attorneys and handle simple matters before judges.
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