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By Kate Shatzkin and Kate Shatzkin,SUN STAFF | March 21, 1997
Baltimore State's Attorney Patricia C. Jessamy announced yesterday that she is seeking the death penalty against Joseph Ray Metheny in the killings of two women -- the first time the prosecutor has sought the ultimate punishment since taking office two years ago.Metheny, 42, has claimed that he has killed up to 10 people, including two homeless men he was acquitted of bludgeoning to death last year.Metheny is charged with first-degree murder and robbery in the killings of Kimberly Lynn Spicer, 23, and Cathy Ann Magaziner, ++ 39. Police say he confessed to both killings, but Metheny pleaded not guilty to the charges yesterday.
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NEWS
By MICHAEL OLESKER | September 5, 2002
IN NORTHWESTERN District Court yesterday morning, Judge Kathleen Sweeney listened to 18 cases that seemed merely a judicial appetizer for the rest of the day. These cases involved theft and assault. They involved counterfeit videotapes and distribution of narcotics. They involved requests for hospitalization of mentally ill relatives and leaving the scene of an accident and fraud. These 18 cases took a total of 65 minutes to hear. After these, the court docket said Sweeney still had 33 cases to go, making a total of 51. In the district courts of Baltimore, 51 cases is known as an average morning.
NEWS
October 24, 1994
Even though five-term incumbent Thomas E. Hickman fancies the state's attorney race in Carroll County as a three-person contest, it really involves two people. Voters can write in the name of Mr. Hickman, who lost in the Republican primary, but the general election winner will be either Republican Jerry F. Barnes or Democrat Linda Holmes.After 20 years of Mr. Hickman's stewardship, the county state's attorney's office needs to reassess its duties. If the office is to swiftly and efficiently prosecute criminals, it must shed current duties such as scheduling criminal cases and directing the county narcotics task force.
NEWS
By Jennifer McMenamin and Jennifer McMenamin,sun reporter | September 3, 2006
One candidate is a personal injury lawyer who earned millions over the years by beckoning prospective clients with TV ads that invited, "Let's talk about it." The other, a former county prosecutor running with the support of his current boss, attorney and Orioles owner Peter G. Angelos, emphasizes his work experience and describes himself as a "serious guy for a serious job." The two men, Stephen L. Miles and Scott D. Shellenberger, are vying for the Democratic nomination for Baltimore County state's attorney -- a job for which there has not been a contested election in more than two decades.
NEWS
By Caitlin Francke and Caitlin Francke,SUN STAFF | January 3, 1997
Another prosecutor has resigned from the Howard County state's attorney's office, the sixth to leave since February under State's Attorney Marna McLendon's administration.Turnover in the office -- more than a quarter of its 22 prosecutors have left in the past year -- has been much higher than in counterpart offices in Baltimore, Anne Arundel and Harford counties in the same period.McLendon said she was not concerned. Some prosecutors come to the office to gain trial experience, and others become career prosecutors, she said, and the departures create opportunities for others.
NEWS
By Tricia Bishop and Tricia Bishop,tricia.bishop@baltsun.com | September 13, 2009
As soon as Maryland's Gang Prosecution Act went into effect in 2007, prosecutors in Harford County tested it, filing charges against a group that had stabbed and beaten a man. But when prosecutors couldn't show how the attack had furthered a criminal conspiracy, as required under the new law, the judge balked. They had to drop the gang charges and move forward with simple assault. "It's a very unworkable statute. ... Most prosecutors haven't really bothered to do anything with it," said Harford County State's Attorney Joseph I. Cassilly, who contends that the law is watered-down and useless.
NEWS
By Dennis O'Brien and Dennis O'Brien,Staff Writer | March 4, 1993
Attorneys for three men charged with being part one of the biggest drug rings in county history argued yesterday that search warrants were sworn out based on insufficient evidence, that prosecutors were using the grand jury improperly and that the judge who signed the search warrants was biased in favor of the police.Attorneys representing brothers James M. Emory, 47, of Pasadena and Roger Lee Emory, 43, of Glen Burnie, as well as Philip B. Dulany, 48, of Pasadena, asked that 400 pounds of marijuana seized during an Oct. 29, 1992, raid be ruled inadmissible as evidence.
NEWS
By Alan J. Craver and Alan J. Craver,SUN STAFF | October 1, 1995
With the resignation of one of the county's top prosecutors, an assistant state's attorney who primarily handles drug cases has been promoted at the Howard state's attorney's office.Mary Murphy, a county prosecutor for about four years, will become one of three senior assistant state's attorneys Oct. 23, Howard State's Attorney Marna McLendon announced Friday."She's a very able attorney," Ms. McLendon said. "We believe she's a leader."Ms. Murphy, a 30-year-old Timonium resident, will replace Joseph Murtha, who resigned last week to become an associate with a private law firm in Baltimore.
NEWS
By Lisa Respers and Lisa Respers,SUN STAFF | November 14, 1999
It's hard to keep up with Mimi Cooper.For the past few years, the 37-year-old Cooper has juggled her career as a Harford County prosecutor and crime prevention official with the demands of a young family. Last week, she took on a new role: that of Judge Cooper."It feels good," Cooper said after spending a day on the bench observing cases handled by District Court Judge Emory A. Plitt Jr., part of the training that will prepare her for full-time judicial duties. "I'm really excited."Her appointment to the Harford County bench last month by Gov. Parris N. Glendening is the culmination of more than a decade of work by the University of Baltimore Law School alumna, who set her sights on the legal profession after working as a legal aid volunteer while an undergraduate.
NEWS
By ANDREW A. GREEN and ANDREW A. GREEN,SUN REPORTER | May 24, 2006
SILVER SPRING -- Saying he has the breadth of experience to protect consumers, the environment and minorities, Montgomery County Councilman Thomas E. Perez announced his candidacy for attorney general yesterday. The Democrat and former U.S. Justice Department lawyer said he wants to continue and expand upon the legacy of retiring Attorney General J. Joseph Curran Jr. He said he would guarantee civil rights, stamp out public corruption and help ensure that all Marylanders have access to quality health care.
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