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By SUMATHI REDDY and SUMATHI REDDY,SUN REPORTER | June 1, 2006
A Baltimore Circuit Court judge has dismissed a $14 million lawsuit accusing city and state leaders of failing to protect the Dawson family from the 2002 firebombing that killed the couple and their five children. Judge M. Brooke Murdock struck down an argument from survivors that the city created danger by soliciting participation through its "Believe" campaign and by encouraging residents to report criminal activity to police. The judge ruled that the advertisements were directed at all Baltimore residents and not to the Dawsons specifically.
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NEWS
By Jeff Barker and Jeff Barker,SUN STAFF | September 30, 2003
Prince George's County State's Attorney Glenn F. Ivey said yesterday that his office is considering criminal charges against the parents of a 4-year-old boy who fatally shot his 5-year-old sister with a semiautomatic handgun, even as the family mourns the girl's death. "We understand the family must be grieving and, yes, that's something we consider," Ivey said in an interview. "At the same time, we've got some legal obligations. Parental accountability is a point of emphasis for us, especially when it comes to making sure kids don't get their hands on loaded weapons."
NEWS
By Matthew Dolan and Matthew Dolan,SUN STAFF | January 4, 2005
Maryland's new U.S. attorney said at his swearing-in ceremony yesterday that he does not intend to seek the post permanently, keeping open the contest to become the state's next top federal prosecutor. Allen F. Loucks was ushered in yesterday morning to replace Thomas M. DiBiagio, who announced his resignation last month. Loucks, who has worked in the office for 10 years, said it was common to have a placeholder fill the job while awaiting a permanent U.S. attorney appointed by the president.
NEWS
May 22, 2003
Police chief dismayed by Jessamy's jabs The Sun's editorial "Enough is enough" (May 16) was absolutely accurate: The Police Department and the state's attorney's office do need to work in cooperation to fight crime in this city. This is precisely the reason that I met with Baltimore State's Attorney Patricia C. Jessamy after only two days in my position as police commissioner. Recognizing that the relationship between the heads of the two agencies has been less than amicable in the past, I pledged my commitment and support to work with the state's attorney, toward what I believed was our mutual goal of reducing crime and improving public safety.
NEWS
By Don Markus, The Baltimore Sun | May 20, 2010
Called for jury duty for the third time that he can remember, Dario Broccolino doesn't know why he wasn't picked Thursday to hear a personal injury complaint stemming from an automobile accident. Maybe because he's the top prosecutor for Howard County? "I have no idea which side didn't want me on the jury," Broccolino said. "There's a million different reasons why you want someone on a jury or don't want them on a jury, what perceptions or preconceived ideas you have." Broccolino walked into the courtroom of Circuit Judge Timothy McCrone — his predecessor and former boss — not as Howard County state's attorney but as a citizen called to meet a civic obligation.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Frederick N. Rasmussen and Jacques Kelly and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | July 30, 2002
Anselm Sodaro, Baltimore's former chief judge who as a prosecutor won a stunning conviction in the 1952 Grammer murder case, died of cancer Sunday at Gilchrist Center for Hospice Care. He was 91 and had lived in Towson for a decade. He was the city state's attorney from 1950 to 1956, winning national attention for sending a Northeast Baltimore man to the gallows for murdering his wife in what was dubbed "the almost perfect crime." Gov. Theodore R. McKeldin, a Republican, picked Judge Sodaro, a Democrat, to fill a vacancy on the Supreme Bench of Baltimore City - now the Circuit Court - in 1956, and he remained on the bench for nearly 35 years.
NEWS
By Caitlin Francke and Caitlin Francke,SUN STAFF | February 14, 1997
An Ellicott City attorney has lost his law license for illegally making thousands of photocopies in the Howard County Courthouse.Melvin Gary Rybczynski -- who also runs a local title business -- was disbarred by the Court of Appeals on Feb. 5.In October, he was sentenced to two weeks in jail and ordered to pay more than $2,500 in restitution for making copies with a state-owned copy card.Melvin Hirshman, counsel for the state's Attorney Grievance Commission, said Rybczynski consented to the disbarment in the middle of an investigation because he could not defend himself against the charges of improper conduct.
NEWS
By Fred Rasmussen and Fred Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | April 24, 1996
Jean Stovall Anderson, who during her 30-year career as a receptionist in the Baltimore City state's attorney's office became a trusted friend of judges, lawyers and crime victims, died Thursday of cancer at Greater Baltimore Medical Center. She was 71.Mrs. Anderson was the first black female to work in the Baltimore state's attorney's office, according to Judge Charles E. Moylan of the Maryland Court of Special Appeals, who as the city's top prosecutor hired her in 1966.At the time of her death, she was assigned to the victims' services unit.
NEWS
October 9, 1998
PROSECUTING criminals is one of the most important jobs in the courthouse. Citizens want a state's attorney who vigorously and effectively prosecutes people charged with committing felonies, misdemeanors and other infractions of laws and ordinances.Frank R. Weathersbee, a Democrat, has occupied the position since 1988, when, as the deputy, he was appointed to fill a vacancy. In 1990 and 1994, voters re-elected him.Richard R. Trunnell, a Republican and former Prince George's assistant state's attorney, is seeking to unseat him.Mr.
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