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By Darren M. Allen and Darren M. Allen,Staff Writer | October 11, 1992
A former Carroll assistant state's attorney who represented man charged with his fourth drunken-driving offense had helped to prepare the case against him, according to court records.David M. Littrell, who was asked to resign from the prosecutor's office on July 31, took on Timothy R. Angles as a client last month. Mr. Angles, who already had three drunken-driving convictions on his record, faced his fourth charge stemming from a one-car accident in January in which two people were injured.
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NEWS
By Tom Pelton and Tom Pelton,SUN STAFF | October 22, 1997
Anne Arundel County Executive John G. Gary is accusing the local circuit court's top judge of being soft on alleged law-breaking by an assistant state's attorney who donated to the judge's campaign.The Gary administration has asked for a state investigation into whether Trevor Kiessling, head of the county drug asset forfeiture program, routinely lied to judges by filing papers falsely claiming that the county police chief had approved the auctioning of cars seized from drug suspects.Gary's attorney and Kiessling's office have asked Administrative Judge Clayton Greene Jr. to meet with them and help decide whether Kiessling did anything wrong.
NEWS
By Caitlin Francke and Caitlin Francke,SUN STAFF | January 3, 1997
Another prosecutor has resigned from the Howard County state's attorney's office, the sixth to leave since February under State's Attorney Marna McLendon's administration.Turnover in the office -- more than a quarter of its 22 prosecutors have left in the past year -- has been much higher than in counterpart offices in Baltimore, Anne Arundel and Harford counties in the same period.McLendon said she was not concerned. Some prosecutors come to the office to gain trial experience, and others become career prosecutors, she said, and the departures create opportunities for others.
NEWS
By Thom Loverro and Thom Loverro,Sun Staff Correspondent | October 18, 1990
UPPER MARLBORO -- For most of his adult life, Arthur A. "Bud" Marshall was not just state's attorney for Prince George's County, he was the law. The post was not just a job for him; it was who he was.Four years ago, a young black attorney named Alexander Williams Jr. stripped Mr. Marshall of that identity when he defeated the six-term incumbent in a landmark upset victory, the first countywide black official elected to office in the white-dominated county.Life...
NEWS
By SUMATHI REDDY and SUMATHI REDDY,SUN REPORTER | June 28, 2006
Stuart O. Simms, the former Baltimore prosecutor who held two Maryland Cabinet positions in the Glendening administration, will announce his candidacy for Maryland attorney general tomorrow, injecting fresh competition into the Democratic primary. Marsha Koger, a spokeswoman for the Simms campaign, confirmed that the 55-year-old Baltimore attorney has decided to run for the seat left open by retiring Attorney General J. Joseph Curran Jr. The news comes less than a week after Simms' run for lieutenant governor ended with the abrupt withdrawal of his running mate, Douglas M. Duncan, from the governor's race.
NEWS
By Dennis O'Brien and Dennis O'Brien,Staff Writer | May 18, 1993
Citing insufficient evidence, the state's attorney dropped charges yesterday against a 32-year-old Arnold man charged in the 1989 slaying of a Glen Burnie teen-ager.Mark John Loetz of the 900 block of Burnett Ave. will still spend the next year in the county detention center, where he has been held since December for violating terms of probation on a drug distribution conviction, according to detention center officials.The dismissal was formally approved yesterday by Circuit Judge Raymond G. Thieme Jr. in a brief hearing.
NEWS
By Caitlin Francke and Caitlin Francke,SUN STAFF | February 11, 2001
The rules seem clear: Prosecutors must tell a defendant about any evidence that could help prove his innocence or reduce the extent of his guilt. They must also show him all material they plan to use against him in a trial, a right that dates to the American Revolution and is incorporated as a guarantee in the U.S. Constitution. But in Baltimore, city prosecutors continue to run afoul of these rules, enraging judges and defense attorneys and placing viable criminal cases at risk of being dismissed.
NEWS
By Darren M. Allen and Darren M. Allen,Sun Staff Writer | January 4, 1995
In a homecoming of sorts, Jerry F. Barnes was sworn in yesterday as Carroll's state's attorney, officially replacing the five-term incumbent who gave him his first job in law and was his mentor and close friend.But for most of the lawyers who worked in the office under Thomas E. Hickman -- many of whom Mr. Barnes still refers to as friends -- the transfer of power looked more like an eviction.Since Carroll voters overwhelmingly placed Mr. Barnes in the prosecutor's office Nov. 8, seven of the 11 assistant state's attorneys have quit, been fired, or asked to resign, many of them in the past two weeks.
NEWS
By Sheridan Lyons and Sheridan Lyons,Staff Writer | October 21, 1993
A Baltimore County jury took less than five hours yesterday to convict Baltimore police Sgt. James Allan Kulbicki of first-degree murder in the shooting death of a young woman who bore him a child during an adulterous, three-year affair.Kulbicki, apparently prepared for the worst, went back to hug his wife, Connie, their 9-year-old son, Allan, and his 18-year-old stepson, Darryl Marciszewski, as the crowded courtroom awaited the jury.The 37-year-old sergeant stood stoically as the verdict was delivered, but his wife, and the mother and sister of the victim, 22-year-old Gina Marie Nueslein, began to sob.Judge John Grason Turnbull II, who had called extra sheriff's deputies into the courtroom, immediately revoked Kulbicki's bail but said he would ask the Baltimore County Detention Center "to keep special watch on him" because he is a police officer and might be harmed by inmates.
NEWS
By Jay Merwin and Jay Merwin,Evening Sun Staff Frank D. Roylance contributed to this story | November 7, 1990
The races for Carroll County sheriff, state's attorney and several other local posts remained undecided today, and the candidates will have to wait for a count of an estimated 800 absentee ballots before final tallies are known."
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