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NEWS
By Todd Richissin and Todd Richissin,SUN STAFF | February 6, 1999
PRINCE FREDERICK -- The legal travail of Anthony Gray Jr. -- poor, luckless and slow of wit -- began more than seven years ago, when all indications say he was arrested and sentenced to life in prison merely for being in a very frightened place at a very frightening time.On Monday, Gray is likely to be freed from the prison where he has spent the bulk of his adult life.In an extraordinary admission, the Calvert County state's attorney will tell a judge here that prosecutors made a horrible mistake: No convincing evidence exists that Gray committed the murder that has kept him behind bars.
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NEWS
By Todd Richissin and Matthew Mosk and Todd Richissin and Matthew Mosk,SUN STAFF | March 11, 1999
A Baltimore legislator yesterday introduced a bill that would have the state pay a Southern Maryland man $7.5 million for serving more than seven years in prison for a killing he did not commit.The bill, introduced on the House floor by Democratic Del. Clarence Davis, directs Gov. Parris N. Glendening to budget the money for the "wrongful conviction and wrongful imprisonment" of Anthony Gray Jr., 31, of Calvert County.The bill must go to a committee -- most likely the House Appropriations Committee -- for consideration.
NEWS
By JUSTIN FENTON and JUSTIN FENTON,SUN REPORTER | March 30, 2006
As Darrell Levon Miller testified Tuesday about his involvement in a drug-running gang and the killing of a 37-year-old father of nine, a young man slipped into the courtroom and sat in the front row. His long black T-shirt was inscribed with the words, "Get Down or Lay Down," and depicted images of guns. Two other men lingered outside, where Miller's father heard one say, "We should've popped Darrell when we had the chance." When Judge Thomas E. Marshall learned of the situation, he quickly called a recess and had security guards tell the men to leave the building.
NEWS
By Caitlin Francke and Caitlin Francke,SUN STAFF | January 3, 1997
Another prosecutor has resigned from the Howard County state's attorney's office, the sixth to leave since February under State's Attorney Marna McLendon's administration.Turnover in the office -- more than a quarter of its 22 prosecutors have left in the past year -- has been much higher than in counterpart offices in Baltimore, Anne Arundel and Harford counties in the same period.McLendon said she was not concerned. Some prosecutors come to the office to gain trial experience, and others become career prosecutors, she said, and the departures create opportunities for others.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel | December 13, 2009
Six lawyers, two of them career criminal prosecutors and one a former judge who lost a previous election, will be considered to replace a judge who retired last summer from the Anne Arundel County Circuit Court bench. Sixteen people applied, and the Judicial Nominating Commission for the county winnowed the applicants down last week. Gov. Martin O'Malley must appoint someone from the panel's list, though he can also reopen the process to generate a new list. Whoever is appointed will have a short time on the job before needing to win election next year to keep it, provided the appointment is made before the filing deadline in July for November's election.
NEWS
By Devon Spurgeon and Devon Spurgeon,SUN STAFF | November 17, 1999
Staring straight ahead at the judge who will decide his fate, David A. Dicus listened intently as the state's attorney described him as a calculating killer who on a warm summer night nearly four years ago strangled his wife and dumped her body in a field.Dicus showed little emotion during the 3 1/2 hours of closing arguments yesterday in Anne Arundel County Circuit Court. With his long hair cut for the trial, Dicus briefly smiled at his 15-year-old son, Lucas, who was sitting behind him fidgeting and scribbling into a spiral notebook.
NEWS
By Fred Rasmussen and Fred Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | February 6, 1996
Mary Jo Eichhorn, who worked for 22 years as a secretary in the Baltimore City state's attorney's office, died Sunday of heart failure at Charlestown Retirement Community. She was 80.After raising her children, the longtime Catonsville resident went to work in the office in 1960 and was secretary to State's Attorneys Charles Moylan and George Helinski. Later, she was private secretary to city State's Attorney Milton Allen. At the time of her retirement in 1972, she was secretary to Mary Ann Willin, then deputy city state's attorney.
NEWS
By Lisa Respers and Lisa Respers,SUN STAFF | November 14, 1999
It's hard to keep up with Mimi Cooper.For the past few years, the 37-year-old Cooper has juggled her career as a Harford County prosecutor and crime prevention official with the demands of a young family. Last week, she took on a new role: that of Judge Cooper."It feels good," Cooper said after spending a day on the bench observing cases handled by District Court Judge Emory A. Plitt Jr., part of the training that will prepare her for full-time judicial duties. "I'm really excited."Her appointment to the Harford County bench last month by Gov. Parris N. Glendening is the culmination of more than a decade of work by the University of Baltimore Law School alumna, who set her sights on the legal profession after working as a legal aid volunteer while an undergraduate.
NEWS
July 14, 1999
Prosecutor's office is open and effective and respects the lawAs the state's attorney for Baltimore, I have been and continue to be accessible and accountable. I attend community meetings, return telephone calls and respond to media and citizen inquiries. I am an honest, hardworking public servant who represents the citizens of Baltimore in a competent and responsible fashion.The Sun has interviewed me numerous times. I am the only individual in city government who has opened up her office and life to a Sun reporter.
NEWS
By Norris P. West and Norris P. West,SUN STAFF | April 4, 1996
It was controversial from the start -- police officers paying masseuses to perform illegal sex acts.Now it has become embarrassing as the Howard County state's attorney said yesterday she would drop charges against nine women of Korean descent accused of committing the sex acts.State's Attorney Marna McLendon said it was difficult to prosecute the sex cases under Howard County's current massage-parlor licensing law -- though the 1994 law originally was intended to do just that."I'm hoping we will never be in the same position again and that there will be changes in the law," Ms. McLendon said.
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