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By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | August 12, 2005
Edwin H. W. Harlan Jr., a retired Harford County District Court judge and former state's attorney, died Tuesday of Alzheimer's disease at Charlestown Retirement Community in Catonsville. He was 84. Born and raised in Bel Air, Judge Harlan had descended from a Harford County family involved in the law. His father was a Bel Air attorney and his grandfather had been a Harford County judge. After graduating in 1940 from Episcopal High School in Alexandria, Va., he enrolled at Washington & Lee University in Lexington, Va., where he completed his freshman year before enlisting in the Army in 1942.
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NEWS
By Stephanie Hanes and Stephanie Hanes,SUN STAFF | December 4, 2004
Maryland U.S. Attorney Thomas M. DiBiagio, whose tumultuous term brought him rebukes from Washington as well as major convictions, announced yesterday that he will resign from his post early next year. The move comes days after a representative from the U.S. Department of Justice visited DiBiagio to discuss the findings of a highly unusual review this fall of his performance, according to federal prosecutors who requested anonymity for fear of retribution from Justice officials. But DiBiagio, 44, said yesterday that his move "was expected" and a "personal decision."
NEWS
By Nick Madigan and Nick Madigan,nick.madigan@baltsun.com | January 20, 2010
A former Baltimore County prosecutor who works as an attorney in Towson has been charged with carjacking and armed robbery in connection with an incident last week near his home. Isaiah Dixon III, 54, who worked as an assistant state's attorney for almost eight years until July 1997, was arrested Monday after police say he ran from officers on Belle Avenue in Northwest Baltimore. A police spokesman said the officers had converged there after a man was spotted driving a 2009 Honda Accord that had been taken at gunpoint Friday from its owner, a 31-year-old woman.
NEWS
By Carol L. Bowers and Carol L. Bowers,Staff Writer | July 27, 1993
Maryland's attorney general is demanding to see a copy of the movie contract signed by a former Anne Arundel County teacher who has admitted to having sex with students.Attorney General J. Joseph Curran Jr. said he filed suit in Anne Arundel County Circuit Court to prevent Ronald Walter Price, who taught at Northeast High School until spring, from profiting from his alleged crimes."We have requested, by phone and by letter, that the contract be examined by us, and we've been refused a chance to see the contract," Mr. Curran said.
NEWS
By Jay Apperson and Jay Apperson,Staff writer | March 28, 1991
With one vacancy on the county's District Court bench still unfilled, Judge Robert N. Lucke is creating another opening by retiring.But the vacancy created when Judge Thomas J. Curley retired two months ago likely will be filled before Lucke's retirement becomes effective May 3, the governor's appointments secretary said yesterday.The seven finalists for Curley's position had been scheduled to be interviewed yesterday by Gov. William Donald Schaefer, said Robert A. Pascal. The appointments secretary added the governor will likely announce his choice, which is subject to state Senate confirmation, by the end of this week or, at the latest, sometime next week.
NEWS
By Michael James and Michael James,Staff writer | October 28, 1990
Twenty years ago, Richard J. Kinlein -- who would turn out to be one of Howard County's most controversial state's attorneys -- appointed 43-year-old William R. Hymes as a prosecutor. The two have been at odds ever since.Now, Kinlein is facing an uphill battle to get his old job back, but Hymes is showing no signs of relinquishing the office he has held for the past three terms.Hymes, a staunch conservative Democrat who has been county state's attorney since 1978, is firmly entrenched in an office that he would be bitterly reluctant to surrender to Kinlein, well-known in county legal circles as a maverick Republican.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel and Andrea F. Siegel,SUN REPORTER | November 8, 2006
Montgomery County State's Attorney Douglas F. Gansler yesterday was elected Maryland's first new attorney general in two decades, completing a political journey years in the making. "The message we conveyed with public safety and protecting the environment crossed party lines," Gansler, 44, of Chevy Chase, said as he headed toward a gathering of Democrats in Baltimore. "I'm excited about getting started." His opponent, Frederick County State's Attorney Scott L. Rolle, 45, conceded shortly before 10:30 p.m., saying he knew his chances appeared slim.
NEWS
By GREGORY KANE | August 4, 2002
THE KID in the blow-up black-and-white photo was more toddler than boy, a lad of 3 with a mop of curly blond hair adorning his tiny pate. He had his dukes up, the right fist close to his chest and the left farther out and up near his chin. "I've always been a fighter," Anton James Sean Keating said as he looked at the childhood picture of himself. It must be in the genes. His father, Charles Keating, was heavyweight boxing champion of the British army during World War II and later a professional boxer.
NEWS
By Tyrone Richardson and Tyrone Richardson,sun reporter | April 4, 2007
Longtime Senior Assistant State's Attorney Michael D. Rexroad arrived at Howard County Circuit Court last week for what he thought was a routine show-cause hearing. But he quickly found that the hearing was a ploy to lure him to Courtroom 1 for a surprise sendoff Thursday to mark his retirement after more than 28 years with the state's attorney's office. He told the assembled judges, prosecutors, public defenders and court staff that he pleaded guilty to retirement on condition that he will spend it relaxing and teaching at the University of Baltimore Law School, his alma mater.
NEWS
By SUMATHI REDDY and SUMATHI REDDY,SUN REPORTER | June 1, 2006
A Baltimore Circuit Court judge has dismissed a $14 million lawsuit accusing city and state leaders of failing to protect the Dawson family from the 2002 firebombing that killed the couple and their five children. Judge M. Brooke Murdock struck down an argument from survivors that the city created danger by soliciting participation through its "Believe" campaign and by encouraging residents to report criminal activity to police. The judge ruled that the advertisements were directed at all Baltimore residents and not to the Dawsons specifically.
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