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By Mike Farabaugh and Mike Farabaugh,SUN STAFF | May 9, 1997
Jerry F. Barnes, state's attorney for Carroll County, yesterday become the first county prosecutor in Maryland to receive a state police superintendent's salute.Barnes, 48, received the citation from Maj. Gary Cox, central region commander, and Lt. Lawrence E. Faries, commander of the Westminster barracks, on behalf of Col. David B. Mitchell, state police superintendent. The award was presented in Barnes' office.Cox praised Barnes for his dedication and cooperation, recalling that the state's attorney once left his sickbed to answer legal questions and offer advice on filing charges.
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NEWS
By MICHAEL OLESKER | September 5, 2002
IN NORTHWESTERN District Court yesterday morning, Judge Kathleen Sweeney listened to 18 cases that seemed merely a judicial appetizer for the rest of the day. These cases involved theft and assault. They involved counterfeit videotapes and distribution of narcotics. They involved requests for hospitalization of mentally ill relatives and leaving the scene of an accident and fraud. These 18 cases took a total of 65 minutes to hear. After these, the court docket said Sweeney still had 33 cases to go, making a total of 51. In the district courts of Baltimore, 51 cases is known as an average morning.
NEWS
By Alan J. Craver and Alan J. Craver,Sun Staff Writer | July 12, 1994
An experienced prosecutor and executive director of the Maryland State's Attorneys Association, Dario Joseph Broccolino describes himself as an outsider with no special-interest ties to the county's criminal justice system.Those qualities, he said, make him an ideal candidate for Howard County state's attorney.Mr. Broccolino, 49, of Ellicott City, filed to enter the Democratic race for state's attorney on July 5, the last day the county Board of Elections accepted filings.If elected, said Mr. Broccolino, said he would put the concerns of victims and citizens before the interests of defense attorneys, judges and police officers.
NEWS
By Tricia Bishop and Tricia Bishop,tricia.bishop@baltsun.com | September 13, 2009
As soon as Maryland's Gang Prosecution Act went into effect in 2007, prosecutors in Harford County tested it, filing charges against a group that had stabbed and beaten a man. But when prosecutors couldn't show how the attack had furthered a criminal conspiracy, as required under the new law, the judge balked. They had to drop the gang charges and move forward with simple assault. "It's a very unworkable statute. ... Most prosecutors haven't really bothered to do anything with it," said Harford County State's Attorney Joseph I. Cassilly, who contends that the law is watered-down and useless.
NEWS
By Norris P. West and Norris P. West,Staff Writer Washington Bureau contributing writer Nelson Schwartz assisted with this article | February 3, 1993
Baltimore State's Attorney Stuart O. Simms is being considered for a post in the Clinton administration.Mr. Simms, 42, said he was approached by members of the Clinton transition team to apply for chief of the U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration."
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | March 10, 2005
William Green Kerbin Jr., a former Worcester County state's attorney and newspaper publisher who practiced law for 71 years until suffering a fall six weeks ago, died of congestive heart failure Monday at Peninsula Regional Medical Center in Salisbury. He was 94. "He was one of the classiest guys you could think of and an example for all of us," said Court of Appeals Chief Judge Robert M. Bell, a longtime friend. "To him, the law wasn't just making a living. It was a calling that he took very seriously."
NEWS
By Darren M. Allen and Darren M. Allen,Sun Staff Writer | December 7, 1994
Beginning next month, Carroll County will join most other Maryland jurisdictions in the selective use of polygraph testing for rape victims, reversing a long-held policy established by the departing state's attorney.Jerry F. Barnes, who on Jan. 3 will replace Carroll State's Attorney Thomas E. Hickman, said he doesn't see why police should be denied the use of polygraph examinations in cases where a victim's story doesn't appear to lead anywhere."This is going to be a rare thing, a one-in-a-thousand kind of thing," Mr. Barnes said this week.
NEWS
By Allison Klein and Allison Klein,SUN STAFF | April 29, 2003
Warren A. Brown, Warren A. Brown, the loquacious litigator and City Council hopeful, grabbed air time on 60 Minutes and space in major American newspapers last year in his successful defense of Dontee D. Stokes, the Baltimore man who shot a priest Stokes said had molested him as a teen-ager. Yesterday, Brown requested a temporary move to the other side of the courtroom. In a hyperbolic letter to the city state's attorney's office, Brown asked to help bring sex abuse charges against Maurice J. Blackwell, the priest shot by Stokes in May. While the state's attorney's office and legal scholars deem the move a clear conflict of interest, Brown advocates the unusual legal maneuver on simple grounds: "Poetic justice."
NEWS
By Darren M. Allen and Darren M. Allen,Sun Staff Writer | January 13, 1995
The election's been over for months, but don't tell that to DTC State's Attorney Jerry F. Barnes or the 20-year incumbent he trounced at the polls.For much of the week, Mr. Barnes' administrative deputy has publicly complained about the sloppy accounting, inaccurate budgets and mishandled records allegedly left by Thomas E. Hickman and his staff when they departed Jan. 3.Saying that her boss is interested only in bringing "fiscal accountability" back to...
NEWS
By Lisa Respers and Lisa Respers,SUN STAFF | November 14, 1999
It's hard to keep up with Mimi Cooper.For the past few years, the 37-year-old Cooper has juggled her career as a Harford County prosecutor and crime prevention official with the demands of a young family. Last week, she took on a new role: that of Judge Cooper."It feels good," Cooper said after spending a day on the bench observing cases handled by District Court Judge Emory A. Plitt Jr., part of the training that will prepare her for full-time judicial duties. "I'm really excited."Her appointment to the Harford County bench last month by Gov. Parris N. Glendening is the culmination of more than a decade of work by the University of Baltimore Law School alumna, who set her sights on the legal profession after working as a legal aid volunteer while an undergraduate.
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