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By Darren M. Allen and Darren M. Allen,Staff Writer | October 11, 1992
A former Carroll assistant state's attorney who represented man charged with his fourth drunken-driving offense had helped to prepare the case against him, according to court records.David M. Littrell, who was asked to resign from the prosecutor's office on July 31, took on Timothy R. Angles as a client last month. Mr. Angles, who already had three drunken-driving convictions on his record, faced his fourth charge stemming from a one-car accident in January in which two people were injured.
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NEWS
By Dennis O'Brien and Dennis O'Brien,Sun Staff Writer | April 18, 1994
Maryland's prosecutors say a measure rushed through the General Assembly will make it harder for them to confiscate the motor vehicles used by drug dealers.The Maryland State's Attorney's Association plans to ask Gov. William Donald Schaefer to veto the bill because prosecutors say it would rob them of their discretion in deciding when to seize a drug dealer's vehicle."It's a crazy law. Absolutely crazy," said Harford County State's Attorney Joseph I. Cassilly.But lawyers specializing in criminal cases say the bill, which would take effect Oct. 1, provides needed judicial oversight of a process in which the state takes ownership of a defendant's property.
NEWS
By Allison Klein and Allison Klein,SUN STAFF | April 29, 2003
Warren A. Brown, Warren A. Brown, the loquacious litigator and City Council hopeful, grabbed air time on 60 Minutes and space in major American newspapers last year in his successful defense of Dontee D. Stokes, the Baltimore man who shot a priest Stokes said had molested him as a teen-ager. Yesterday, Brown requested a temporary move to the other side of the courtroom. In a hyperbolic letter to the city state's attorney's office, Brown asked to help bring sex abuse charges against Maurice J. Blackwell, the priest shot by Stokes in May. While the state's attorney's office and legal scholars deem the move a clear conflict of interest, Brown advocates the unusual legal maneuver on simple grounds: "Poetic justice."
NEWS
By JACQUES KELLY and JACQUES KELLY,SUN REPORTER | April 26, 2006
Judge Stephanie L. Royster, a top criminal prosecutor in the Baltimore state's attorney's office who was appointed to the city Circuit Court in November, died of cancer Monday at Gilchrist Center for Hospice Care. The West Baltimore resident was 45. She had been chief of staff for the state's attorney's office, supervising more than 400 employees, when she was named to the bench. She had formerly been senior prosecutor in the homicide division. "She had a presence in the courtroom and a sensitivity that jurors trusted," State's Attorney Patricia C. Jessamy said yesterday.
NEWS
By Sumathi Reddy and Sumathi Reddy,sun reporter | August 24, 2006
The Stuart O. Simms who was greeting potential voters at the Shady Grove Metro Station in Rockville on a recent morning is one whom friends and supporters might not recognize. Here was Simms -- the reserved, graying, Ivy League-educated attorney -- bouncing up and down, hands wildly waving as he declared that he is running for Maryland attorney general. "You made someone jump this morning!" the 56-year-old said in a booming baritone. "Don't say you didn't make a politician jump!"
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Frederick N. Rasmussen and Jacques Kelly and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | July 30, 2002
Anselm Sodaro, Baltimore's former chief judge who as a prosecutor won a stunning conviction in the 1952 Grammer murder case, died of cancer Sunday at Gilchrist Center for Hospice Care. He was 91 and had lived in Towson for a decade. He was the city state's attorney from 1950 to 1956, winning national attention for sending a Northeast Baltimore man to the gallows for murdering his wife in what was dubbed "the almost perfect crime." Gov. Theodore R. McKeldin, a Republican, picked Judge Sodaro, a Democrat, to fill a vacancy on the Supreme Bench of Baltimore City - now the Circuit Court - in 1956, and he remained on the bench for nearly 35 years.
NEWS
July 14, 1999
Prosecutor's office is open and effective and respects the lawAs the state's attorney for Baltimore, I have been and continue to be accessible and accountable. I attend community meetings, return telephone calls and respond to media and citizen inquiries. I am an honest, hardworking public servant who represents the citizens of Baltimore in a competent and responsible fashion.The Sun has interviewed me numerous times. I am the only individual in city government who has opened up her office and life to a Sun reporter.
NEWS
By Dana Hedgpeth and Dana Hedgpeth,SUN STAFF | October 2, 1998
An article in Friday's Howard County edition of The Sun incorrectly described the conviction rate of the Howard County state's attorney's office. About 60 percent of the defendants whose cases go to trial are convicted. Other cases, which account for the majority of criminal cases, are typically resolved through plea bargains.The Sun regrets the error.Howard County State's Attorney Marna L. McLendon has started running her first cable television ads, drawing criticism from some political consultants for showing a local, nonpartisan leader taking an active role in her re-election campaign.
NEWS
July 5, 1992
Prosecutor hires 2WESTMINSTER -- The daughter of former Baltimore Colts coach Ted Marchibroda and a veteran state police investigator are the two newest members of the State's Attorney's Office.State's Attorney Thomas E. Hickman on Thursday announced that Lonni Marchibroda, 33, is the newest assistant state's attorney and James M. Leete, 50, will serve as the office's second criminal investigator. Both people started their jobs Wednesday.Ms. Marchibroda most recently was an attorney in an Annapolis firm before joining the Carroll office.
NEWS
By Julie Bykowicz and Julie Bykowicz,SUN STAFF | July 2, 2005
Defrocked West Baltimore priest Maurice Blackwell will not face a new trial on charges that he sexually assaulted a onetime choirboy who later shot him, the state's attorney's office said yesterday, bringing to a definitive end a contentious case that dates to 1993. "I reached a decision that I believe is in the interest of justice," State's Attorney Patricia C. Jessamy said in a statement that outlined her reasons for not moving forward with another trial. Prosecutors had been mum on their plans for the case since April, when a Baltimore Circuit Court judge overturned Blackwell's conviction by granting his request for a new trial, based on what the judge ruled was improper testimony about the former priest's other possible victims.
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