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By JACQUES KELLY and JACQUES KELLY,SUN REPORTER | April 26, 2006
Judge Stephanie L. Royster, a top criminal prosecutor in the Baltimore state's attorney's office who was appointed to the city Circuit Court in November, died of cancer Monday at Gilchrist Center for Hospice Care. The West Baltimore resident was 45. She had been chief of staff for the state's attorney's office, supervising more than 400 employees, when she was named to the bench. She had formerly been senior prosecutor in the homicide division. "She had a presence in the courtroom and a sensitivity that jurors trusted," State's Attorney Patricia C. Jessamy said yesterday.
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NEWS
By JENNIFER MCMENAMIN and JENNIFER MCMENAMIN,SUN REPORTER | July 1, 2006
He may be Baltimore's most recognizable lawyer, having beckoned potential clients with TV ads that proclaimed "Let's talk about it" for so long that strangers now approach him with the catchphrase. After a 37-year legal career, primarily representing plaintiffs in personal-injury cases, Stephen L. Miles wants to talk about something else: He's running for Baltimore County state's attorney. "It's time to give back at this stage in my career," the 63-year-old county native said. "It sounds corny, I know.
NEWS
By Elaine Tassy and Elaine Tassy,SUN STAFF | October 28, 1996
They are the lawyers in limbo on the ladder to litigation.Julie Marindin, Brian Thompson and Marc L. Zayon graduated from the University of Baltimore School of Law in December and passed the bar in June. They could find jobs at big firms, if they wanted.Instead, these doctors of jurisprudence earn $24,000 as law clerks in the Baltimore County state's attorney's office, waiting for prosecutors' jobs to open.The only full-fledged lawyers now working as law clerks for state prosecutors in the Baltimore metropolitan region, they routinely tote carts full of files down the hall, sit in court next to seasoned prosecutors, do research for attorneys and handle simple matters before judges.
NEWS
By David Michael Ettlin and David Michael Ettlin,SUN STAFF | February 13, 2003
Milton Burke Allen, Baltimore's first black state's attorney who also defended and tried criminal defendants as a lawyer and judge in a career that spanned four decades, died of cardiac arrest yesterday at his Windsor Hills home. He was 85. When he was elected in 1970 as state's attorney, Mr. Allen became the first African-American elected to citywide office - other than a judgeship - and the first black person to hold a chief prosecutor's position in a major U.S. city. Born in Baltimore, he was the son of Claude Mercell and Minnie Magee Allen.
NEWS
By MICHAEL OLESKER | February 16, 2003
THIS ONE IS for Milton Allen, who took the most hurtful shots and kept going with his glasses perched atop his bald head and his cigar hovering like a baton and his faith in the law intact. He was Baltimore's first African-American state's attorney, and this is only the headline stuff. He was a civilized man in an uncivilized time, and a grownup in a time when people sometimes screamed at each other like children. He could have been bitter but never gave in. He should have been state's attorney longer but nursed his wounds and moved on. In a time when black people were still denied the basics of fair play, including a first-rate education, he grabbed what he could: the written word.
NEWS
By Mike Farabaugh and Mike Farabaugh,SUN STAFF | July 3, 1996
Prosecutor Martha Ann Sitterding has resigned as deputy state's attorney for Carroll County, effective Aug. 1, to join her husband's growing private law practice in Westminster, she said yesterday.The transition from prosecuting attorney to defense attorney should not be difficult, she said."As a prosecutor, you ask yourself, 'What do I have here, and what does it tell me?' As a defense attorney, you ask, "What's here, and what's the matter with it?' "Sitterding joined the state's attorney's office 18 months ago after 13 years specializing in sexual offense cases with the Public Defender's Office of Carroll County.
NEWS
By Matthew Dolan and Matthew Dolan,SUN STAFF | January 4, 2005
Maryland's new U.S. attorney said at his swearing-in ceremony yesterday that he does not intend to seek the post permanently, keeping open the contest to become the state's next top federal prosecutor. Allen F. Loucks was ushered in yesterday morning to replace Thomas M. DiBiagio, who announced his resignation last month. Loucks, who has worked in the office for 10 years, said it was common to have a placeholder fill the job while awaiting a permanent U.S. attorney appointed by the president.
NEWS
July 7, 2010
The first sentence of Jean Marbella's piece ("Jessamy draws challenger to re-election," July 5) said it all: Four mayors, six police commissioners and one chief prosecutor over the past 15 years. Time to let someone else see if a better job can be done, having in mind plea deals accepted and numerous excuses over the years for cases either not pursued or lost for various reasons. With his experience as a former federal prosecutor, Gregg Bernstein should be given an opportunity to show a better job can be done in the position.
NEWS
By Tricia Bishop and Tricia Bishop,tricia.bishop@baltsun.com | June 24, 2009
A federal judge denied a Westminster woman's request to withdraw her guilty plea Tuesday and sentenced her to 10 years in prison for sex trafficking of a minor, a 17-year-old cousin whose sexual services she sold under the Internet heading "Available now." Deborah Gail Frock, who was previously convicted of trying to blackmail a state prosecutor, claimed that the government coerced her to take the plea agreement by outlining plans to file additional charges that carried a minimum 30-year sentence if she didn't accept the deal.
NEWS
By Fred Rasmussen and Fred Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | April 24, 1996
Jean Stovall Anderson, who during her 30-year career as a receptionist in the Baltimore City state's attorney's office became a trusted friend of judges, lawyers and crime victims, died Thursday of cancer at Greater Baltimore Medical Center. She was 71.Mrs. Anderson was the first black female to work in the Baltimore state's attorney's office, according to Judge Charles E. Moylan of the Maryland Court of Special Appeals, who as the city's top prosecutor hired her in 1966.At the time of her death, she was assigned to the victims' services unit.
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