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By MIKE BURNS | July 16, 1995
The last time we saw assault charges involving politicians in Harford County, Ruth Elliott and DeWayne Curry were tossing those allegations (as well as candy wrappers) at one other as a result of a closed meeting of the Aberdeen City Council.(Another reason for cutting down on the frequent closed sessions of that body, we might add, but that's a different issue.)There was admittedly political bad blood between the two, in fact between Mayor Elliott and most of the council. The assault charges and countercharges were merely a legal sideshow, actions that were dropped as the battle of those political forces moved to the election box. Mrs. Elliott was ultimately defeated for re-election and Mr. Curry won a second term on the council.
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NEWS
By Todd Richissin and Todd Richissin,SUN STAFF | April 7, 1999
The attorney for a man wrongly imprisoned for more than seven years warned yesterday that he will sue the state unless Gov. Parris N. Glendening grants a pardon and the state agrees to pay the man hundreds of thousands of dollars.The warning was issued a day after a House of Delegates committee killed a bill that would have paid Anthony Gray Jr. $7.5 million.The 31-year-old Calvert County man was jailed for 7 1/2 years in the killing of a Chesapeake Beach woman. He had been sentenced to life in prison but was released last month.
NEWS
By Scott Calvert and Scott Calvert,SUN STAFF | August 23, 2000
In an unusual move, Anne Arundel County Councilman Bill D. Burlison stepped from his seat to the public podium Monday night to criticize the refusal of State's Attorney Frank R. Weathersbee to take on new felony cases from the Maryland prison complex in Jessup. Frustrated by the lack of state dollars to pay for prosecuting inmate crimes, Weathersbee has blocked two potential cases - a homicide and a felony assault - that have been ready for presentation to a grand jury for more than a month.
NEWS
By Mike Farabaugh and Mike Farabaugh,SUN STAFF | June 23, 1997
First Sgt. Robert Windsor, a 27-year veteran with the Maryland State Police, will retire July 1 to become an investigator with the Carroll state's attorney's office.Windsor, 50, will replace Gary Childs, a former Baltimore homicide detective who has been an investigator for the county state's attorney since 1994.Childs will become an officer with the Baltimore County Police Department, said Jerry F. Barnes, Carroll County's state's attorney."We are sad because Gary is leaving, but we feel very fortunate to have someone with the experience of Bob Windsor to replace him," Barnes said.
NEWS
By Elaine Tassy and Elaine Tassy,SUN STAFF | October 28, 1996
They are the lawyers in limbo on the ladder to litigation.Julie Marindin, Brian Thompson and Marc L. Zayon graduated from the University of Baltimore School of Law in December and passed the bar in June. They could find jobs at big firms, if they wanted.Instead, these doctors of jurisprudence earn $24,000 as law clerks in the Baltimore County state's attorney's office, waiting for prosecutors' jobs to open.The only full-fledged lawyers now working as law clerks for state prosecutors in the Baltimore metropolitan region, they routinely tote carts full of files down the hall, sit in court next to seasoned prosecutors, do research for attorneys and handle simple matters before judges.
NEWS
July 14, 1999
Prosecutor's office is open and effective and respects the lawAs the state's attorney for Baltimore, I have been and continue to be accessible and accountable. I attend community meetings, return telephone calls and respond to media and citizen inquiries. I am an honest, hardworking public servant who represents the citizens of Baltimore in a competent and responsible fashion.The Sun has interviewed me numerous times. I am the only individual in city government who has opened up her office and life to a Sun reporter.
NEWS
By Dennis O'Brien and Dennis O'Brien,Staff Writer | May 18, 1993
Citing insufficient evidence, the state's attorney dropped charges yesterday against a 32-year-old Arnold man charged in the 1989 slaying of a Glen Burnie teen-ager.Mark John Loetz of the 900 block of Burnett Ave. will still spend the next year in the county detention center, where he has been held since December for violating terms of probation on a drug distribution conviction, according to detention center officials.The dismissal was formally approved yesterday by Circuit Judge Raymond G. Thieme Jr. in a brief hearing.
NEWS
By JENNIFER MCMENAMIN and JENNIFER MCMENAMIN,SUN REPORTER | July 1, 2006
He may be Baltimore's most recognizable lawyer, having beckoned potential clients with TV ads that proclaimed "Let's talk about it" for so long that strangers now approach him with the catchphrase. After a 37-year legal career, primarily representing plaintiffs in personal-injury cases, Stephen L. Miles wants to talk about something else: He's running for Baltimore County state's attorney. "It's time to give back at this stage in my career," the 63-year-old county native said. "It sounds corny, I know.
NEWS
By Tricia Bishop and Tricia Bishop,tricia.bishop@baltsun.com | September 13, 2009
As soon as Maryland's Gang Prosecution Act went into effect in 2007, prosecutors in Harford County tested it, filing charges against a group that had stabbed and beaten a man. But when prosecutors couldn't show how the attack had furthered a criminal conspiracy, as required under the new law, the judge balked. They had to drop the gang charges and move forward with simple assault. "It's a very unworkable statute. ... Most prosecutors haven't really bothered to do anything with it," said Harford County State's Attorney Joseph I. Cassilly, who contends that the law is watered-down and useless.
NEWS
By Lan Nguyen and Lan Nguyen,Sun Staff Writer | December 30, 1994
New Howard County State's Attorney Marna McLendon has forced six prosecutors to quit as of Jan. 8 and demoted two others in her first major staff change since she was elected last month.Three other prosecutors were put on probation last week, and another three have resigned voluntarily from the 24-member office. Sue-Ellen Hantman, who ran unsuccessfully for county executive, has been hired to join the office.Among those forced to resign was Senior Assistant State's Attorney Kate O'Donnell, who was campaign treasurer for fellow prosecutor Michael Weal in his failed bid for the Democratic nomination for state's attorney.
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