Advertisement
HomeCollectionsState S Attorney
IN THE NEWS

State S Attorney

NEWS
By Darren M. Allen and Darren M. Allen,Sun Staff Writer | August 31, 1994
A prominent Westminster defense attorney told police that Carroll State's Attorney Thomas E. Hickman drove at him as he walked along campaigning for Mr. Hickman's Republican primary election opponent.The prosecutor says that if he had tried to run him over, he wouldn't have missed.Stephen P. Bourexis -- whose relationship with the five-term prosecutor can most politely be called strained -- said that on Sunday, a brown Ford Bronco drove toward him, swerved and stopped in front of him, according to an incident report filed Monday with Maryland State Police by the defense attorney.
Advertisement
NEWS
By Tyeesha Dixon and Tyeesha Dixon,Sun reporter | May 14, 2008
Howard County State's Attorney Dario Broccolino announced yesterday the appointment of Mary V. Murphy as deputy state's attorney. Murphy, 43, will replace Broccolino, who was promoted to state's attorney last month. He replaced Timothy McCrone, who was named a Circuit Court judge in December. Murphy, who has worked as a Howard County assistant state's attorney since 1991, is the first woman to be named deputy, said Wayne Kirwan, Broccolino's spokesman. The only female state's attorney in Howard County was Marna McClendon, who served two four-year terms starting in 1994.
NEWS
By Elaine Tassy and Elaine Tassy,SUN STAFF | January 22, 1996
After 21 years, Baltimore County State's Attorney Sandra A. O'Connor, the county's chief prosecutor, says she's nowhere near calling it quits."There are times when you go, 'Oh, gosh.' But never seriously," she says.This month, Mrs. O'Connor marks 21 years in her elected position. During that time, she has built such a strong prosecutorial reputation that no one will run against her. She created Maryland's first crime victim assistance unit and launched other innovations that have spread throughout the state.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton and Justin Fenton,justin.fenton@baltsun.com | April 15, 2009
A city homicide detective and a Baltimore County sheriff's deputy were acquitted Tuesday of assaulting a man outside a Govans barbershop in a case that took an unusual path to trial. Prosecutors said Detective Terry W. Love Jr., 31, and Deputy Michael Herring, 37, were trying to teach Andre Thomas, 43, a lesson Sept. 8, 2007 after he burst into the Detailer Barbershop on York Road and spewed profanities. Three eyewitnesses who pulled over to help Thomas said they watched two men kick and punch him repeatedly.
NEWS
By Molly Knight and Molly Knight,SUN STAFF | November 13, 2003
The state's highest court ordered a reprimand yesterday of Montgomery County State's Attorney Douglas F. Gansler for remarks he made to the media that the Attorney Grievance Commission argued could have tainted cases. The decision marks the first time the Maryland Court of Appeals has disciplined an attorney for breaching the Maryland Rules of Professional Conduct. In a unanimous opinion, the court stated that between 2000 and 2001, Gansler violated those rules when he "spoke outside of the court about matters that had substantial likelihood of depriving several criminal defendants of fair trials."
NEWS
By Gail Gibson and Gail Gibson,SUN STAFF | June 12, 2002
An attorney for Eric D. Stennett says he is being unfairly singled out for federal prosecution on a relatively routine drug-and-gun case because of his high-profile acquittal in state court in the death of a Baltimore police officer. In raising the claim of selective prosecution, attorney Charles M. Curtis has asked a federal judge to order the U.S. attorney's office to turn over notes of any conversations with the city's top police official and prosecutor as well as with the mayor. U.S. District Judge Catherine C. Blake scheduled a hearing for this morning on Stennett's request - what would be a first step in defense efforts to have the federal charges dismissed on grounds that the 19-year-old Baltimore man was intentionally treated differently from other defendants.
NEWS
By Dennis O'Brien and Dennis O'Brien,Staff Writer | March 4, 1993
Attorneys for three men charged with being part one of the biggest drug rings in county history argued yesterday that search warrants were sworn out based on insufficient evidence, that prosecutors were using the grand jury improperly and that the judge who signed the search warrants was biased in favor of the police.Attorneys representing brothers James M. Emory, 47, of Pasadena and Roger Lee Emory, 43, of Glen Burnie, as well as Philip B. Dulany, 48, of Pasadena, asked that 400 pounds of marijuana seized during an Oct. 29, 1992, raid be ruled inadmissible as evidence.
NEWS
By Elaine Tassy and Elaine Tassy,SUN STAFF | October 28, 1995
Defense attorneys in two Baltimore County death-penalty cases have sought to have the trials moved to other parts of the state to find jurors who are less conservative and are less likely to convict.In a third death-penalty case -- one involving the slaying of Debra Goodwich, 19, last year -- a defense attorney is considering requesting a change of venue because of publicity surrounding the case."Baltimore County notoriously has a conservative-tone juror, and I think some other type situation might be more consistent with what we need ," said Roland Walker, a defense attorney in one of the cases.
NEWS
By Darren M. Allen and Darren M. Allen,Sun Staff Writer | January 13, 1995
The election's been over for months, but don't tell that to DTC State's Attorney Jerry F. Barnes or the 20-year incumbent he trounced at the polls.For much of the week, Mr. Barnes' administrative deputy has publicly complained about the sloppy accounting, inaccurate budgets and mishandled records allegedly left by Thomas E. Hickman and his staff when they departed Jan. 3.Saying that her boss is interested only in bringing "fiscal accountability" back to...
NEWS
By Sheridan Lyons and Sheridan Lyons,Staff Writer | October 21, 1993
A Baltimore County jury took less than five hours yesterday to convict Baltimore police Sgt. James Allan Kulbicki of first-degree murder in the shooting death of a young woman who bore him a child during an adulterous, three-year affair.Kulbicki, apparently prepared for the worst, went back to hug his wife, Connie, their 9-year-old son, Allan, and his 18-year-old stepson, Darryl Marciszewski, as the crowded courtroom awaited the jury.The 37-year-old sergeant stood stoically as the verdict was delivered, but his wife, and the mother and sister of the victim, 22-year-old Gina Marie Nueslein, began to sob.Judge John Grason Turnbull II, who had called extra sheriff's deputies into the courtroom, immediately revoked Kulbicki's bail but said he would ask the Baltimore County Detention Center "to keep special watch on him" because he is a police officer and might be harmed by inmates.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.