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By Tyrone Richardson and Tyrone Richardson,sun reporter | April 4, 2007
Longtime Senior Assistant State's Attorney Michael D. Rexroad arrived at Howard County Circuit Court last week for what he thought was a routine show-cause hearing. But he quickly found that the hearing was a ploy to lure him to Courtroom 1 for a surprise sendoff Thursday to mark his retirement after more than 28 years with the state's attorney's office. He told the assembled judges, prosecutors, public defenders and court staff that he pleaded guilty to retirement on condition that he will spend it relaxing and teaching at the University of Baltimore Law School, his alma mater.
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SPORTS
By Michael J. Clarkand Bill Glauber | March 1, 1991
The Howard County state's attorney yesterday declined to prosecute former Dunbar High School basketball star David Wingate on second-degree rape and related charges by placing the case on an inactive criminal docket for one year. The action may pave the way for Wingate to return to the San Antonio Spurs.William R. Hymes, the state's attorney, responded to a request by a Baltimore teen-ager who testified last week that she had been raped last fall at a party in Columbia but wanted the charges dropped to avoid the pain of a trial.
NEWS
By GREGORY KANE | May 5, 2002
WHAT ARE LISA Stancil's chances of wresting the state's attorney's office away from incumbent Patricia C. Jessamy this election year? "It's not about chance," she'll tell you without the slightest trace of fake humility but more than a barrelful of confidence. "I will be the next state's attorney for Baltimore City." Stancil was sitting this day in the office of her campaign headquarters in the 2100 block of Charles St. She sat behind a desk and chatted with the annoying columnist. She wore a skirt-and-jacket outfit that was shocking red: perhaps the better to announce the shock she plans to pull off this September by winning the Democratic primary for state's attorney.
NEWS
By Lane Harvey Brown and Lane Harvey Brown,SUN STAFF | July 7, 2001
Diana A. Brooks, a Harford County prosecutor since 1986, became the county's first female deputy state's attorney yesterday. Brooks, 43, will work with Jay E. Robinson, who has been deputy state's attorney since 1984. Their boss, State's Attorney Joseph I. Cassilly, won approval in the General Assembly last year to create the second deputy position, to work on training, reviewing courtroom work and overseeing juvenile justice matters. Brooks, a Baltimore native, did not follow a lifelong dream to become a prosecutor.
NEWS
By Darren M. Allen and Darren M. Allen,Sun Staff Writer | December 7, 1994
Beginning next month, Carroll County will join most other Maryland jurisdictions in the selective use of polygraph testing for rape victims, reversing a long-held policy established by the departing state's attorney.Jerry F. Barnes, who on Jan. 3 will replace Carroll State's Attorney Thomas E. Hickman, said he doesn't see why police should be denied the use of polygraph examinations in cases where a victim's story doesn't appear to lead anywhere."This is going to be a rare thing, a one-in-a-thousand kind of thing," Mr. Barnes said this week.
NEWS
By Matthew Dolan and Matthew Dolan,SUN STAFF | January 4, 2005
Maryland's new U.S. attorney said at his swearing-in ceremony yesterday that he does not intend to seek the post permanently, keeping open the contest to become the state's next top federal prosecutor. Allen F. Loucks was ushered in yesterday morning to replace Thomas M. DiBiagio, who announced his resignation last month. Loucks, who has worked in the office for 10 years, said it was common to have a placeholder fill the job while awaiting a permanent U.S. attorney appointed by the president.
NEWS
By MICHAEL OLESKER | September 5, 2002
IN NORTHWESTERN District Court yesterday morning, Judge Kathleen Sweeney listened to 18 cases that seemed merely a judicial appetizer for the rest of the day. These cases involved theft and assault. They involved counterfeit videotapes and distribution of narcotics. They involved requests for hospitalization of mentally ill relatives and leaving the scene of an accident and fraud. These 18 cases took a total of 65 minutes to hear. After these, the court docket said Sweeney still had 33 cases to go, making a total of 51. In the district courts of Baltimore, 51 cases is known as an average morning.
NEWS
By Mike Farabaugh and Mike Farabaugh,SUN STAFF | July 3, 1996
Prosecutor Martha Ann Sitterding has resigned as deputy state's attorney for Carroll County, effective Aug. 1, to join her husband's growing private law practice in Westminster, she said yesterday.The transition from prosecuting attorney to defense attorney should not be difficult, she said."As a prosecutor, you ask yourself, 'What do I have here, and what does it tell me?' As a defense attorney, you ask, "What's here, and what's the matter with it?' "Sitterding joined the state's attorney's office 18 months ago after 13 years specializing in sexual offense cases with the Public Defender's Office of Carroll County.
NEWS
By Laura Vozzella and Laura Vozzella,SUN STAFF | December 19, 2004
Dwight Stanley Thompson, a former deputy state's attorney in Howard County and retired Army lieutenant colonel, died of heart failure Tuesday at his Columbia home. He was 76. Mr. Thompson had been a Howard County prosecutor for several years when William R. Hymes came into office as state's attorney in January 1979. "I looked over the staff and all the other attorneys and he seemed to be the best choice for deputy," Mr. Hymes recalled. "I couldn't have made a better choice. Anything good that you can think of to say about a person in that particular capacity would apply to Dwight."
NEWS
By Josh Mitchell and Josh Mitchell,sun reporter | May 16, 2007
Facing criticism over his salary, Baltimore County State's Attorney Scott D. Shellenberger said he plans to meet with state lawmakers to discuss possible changes to the law that determines how much he is paid. Shellenberger, a Democrat who took office in January, is scheduled to make about $190,000 this year - slightly more than the final salary of his predecessor, Sandra A. O'Connor. At issue is whether Shellenberger's pay should be calculated based on how much O'Connor earned after three decades in office, or whether he should be paid the lower amount that Circuit Court judges make - as some interpret state law. The law ties the state's attorney's pay to the judges' salaries, plus 5 percent annual increases.
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