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By Gail Gibson and Gail Gibson,SUN STAFF | June 12, 2002
An attorney for Eric D. Stennett says he is being unfairly singled out for federal prosecution on a relatively routine drug-and-gun case because of his high-profile acquittal in state court in the death of a Baltimore police officer. In raising the claim of selective prosecution, attorney Charles M. Curtis has asked a federal judge to order the U.S. attorney's office to turn over notes of any conversations with the city's top police official and prosecutor as well as with the mayor. U.S. District Judge Catherine C. Blake scheduled a hearing for this morning on Stennett's request - what would be a first step in defense efforts to have the federal charges dismissed on grounds that the 19-year-old Baltimore man was intentionally treated differently from other defendants.
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NEWS
By JENNIFER MCMENAMIN and JENNIFER MCMENAMIN,SUN REPORTER | July 1, 2006
He may be Baltimore's most recognizable lawyer, having beckoned potential clients with TV ads that proclaimed "Let's talk about it" for so long that strangers now approach him with the catchphrase. After a 37-year legal career, primarily representing plaintiffs in personal-injury cases, Stephen L. Miles wants to talk about something else: He's running for Baltimore County state's attorney. "It's time to give back at this stage in my career," the 63-year-old county native said. "It sounds corny, I know.
NEWS
By Dennis O'Brien and Dennis O'Brien,Staff Writer | May 18, 1993
Citing insufficient evidence, the state's attorney dropped charges yesterday against a 32-year-old Arnold man charged in the 1989 slaying of a Glen Burnie teen-ager.Mark John Loetz of the 900 block of Burnett Ave. will still spend the next year in the county detention center, where he has been held since December for violating terms of probation on a drug distribution conviction, according to detention center officials.The dismissal was formally approved yesterday by Circuit Judge Raymond G. Thieme Jr. in a brief hearing.
NEWS
By David Michael Ettlin and David Michael Ettlin,SUN STAFF | February 13, 2003
Milton Burke Allen, Baltimore's first black state's attorney who also defended and tried criminal defendants as a lawyer and judge in a career that spanned four decades, died of cardiac arrest yesterday at his Windsor Hills home. He was 85. When he was elected in 1970 as state's attorney, Mr. Allen became the first African-American elected to citywide office - other than a judgeship - and the first black person to hold a chief prosecutor's position in a major U.S. city. Born in Baltimore, he was the son of Claude Mercell and Minnie Magee Allen.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Frederick N. Rasmussen and Jacques Kelly and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | July 30, 2002
Anselm Sodaro, Baltimore's former chief judge who as a prosecutor won a stunning conviction in the 1952 Grammer murder case, died of cancer Sunday at Gilchrist Center for Hospice Care. He was 91 and had lived in Towson for a decade. He was the city state's attorney from 1950 to 1956, winning national attention for sending a Northeast Baltimore man to the gallows for murdering his wife in what was dubbed "the almost perfect crime." Gov. Theodore R. McKeldin, a Republican, picked Judge Sodaro, a Democrat, to fill a vacancy on the Supreme Bench of Baltimore City - now the Circuit Court - in 1956, and he remained on the bench for nearly 35 years.
NEWS
By Alan J. Craver and Alan J. Craver,Sun Staff Writer | April 4, 1995
A state administrative judge charged with sexually abusing two teen-age boys, including his foster son, accepted a plea agreement yesterday that spares him a prison term.Marvin Lee Teal of Ellicott City was given a suspended 15-year prison term by Howard Circuit Judge Raymond Kane Jr. after he pleaded guilty to charges that include two counts of child abuse.The victims reported to police that most of the incidents occurred after they fell asleep in Mr. Teal's apartment and awakened to find Mr. Teal molesting them, according to reports filed in Circuit Court.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel and Andrea F. Siegel,andrea.siegel@baltsun.com | December 13, 2009
Six lawyers, two of them career criminal prosecutors and one a former judge who lost a previous election, will be considered to replace a judge who retired last summer from the Anne Arundel County Circuit Court bench. Sixteen people applied, and the Judicial Nominating Commission for the county winnowed the applicants down last week. Gov. Martin O'Malley must appoint someone from the panel's list, though he can also reopen the process to generate a new list. Whoever is appointed will have a short time on the job before needing to win election next year to keep it, provided the appointment is made before the filing deadline in July for November's election.
NEWS
By Caitlin Francke and Caitlin Francke,SUN STAFF | December 4, 1997
The Howard County state's attorney's office has hired an investigator to aid attorneys prosecuting white-collar crimes.State's Attorney Marna McLendon announced this week that Francis W. Curran, a veteran investigator for the federal government, will fill the slot.Curran is deputy assistant inspector general for investigations assigned to the Federal Emergency Management Agency through the Office of Inspector General.He has worked for 27 years with the Internal Revenue Service, Department of Treasury and NASA, as well as FEMA.
NEWS
By Matthew Dolan and Matthew Dolan,SUN STAFF | January 4, 2005
Maryland's new U.S. attorney said at his swearing-in ceremony yesterday that he does not intend to seek the post permanently, keeping open the contest to become the state's next top federal prosecutor. Allen F. Loucks was ushered in yesterday morning to replace Thomas M. DiBiagio, who announced his resignation last month. Loucks, who has worked in the office for 10 years, said it was common to have a placeholder fill the job while awaiting a permanent U.S. attorney appointed by the president.
NEWS
By Jay Merwin and Jay Merwin,Evening Sun Staff Frank D. Roylance contributed to this story | November 7, 1990
The races for Carroll County sheriff, state's attorney and several other local posts remained undecided today, and the candidates will have to wait for a count of an estimated 800 absentee ballots before final tallies are known."
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