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By Mike Farabaugh and Mike Farabaugh,Staff Writer | April 10, 1993
Prompted by the strangulation of an inmate last year at the Harford Detention Center, the county's chief executive and state's attorney have asked the governor to order a state investigation into the jail's operation.County Executive Eileen M. Rehrmann said yesterday that she and State's Attorney Joseph I. Cassilly had co-signed a letter sent Thursday to Gov. William Donald Schaefer, asking that the Attorney General's Office investigate the 308-bed jail and, particularly, circumstances surrounding jail officials' handling of the inmate's death.
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NEWS
By Joe Mathews and Joe Mathews,SUN STAFF | October 17, 1996
After spending six months in the Baltimore City Detention Center, a 15-year-old West Baltimore boy -- accused in April of raping a woman twice his age -- had all charges against him dropped yesterday after DNA tests failed to link him to the incident.Phillip Eugene Moore of the 2900 block of Riggs Ave. had been charged as an adult with first-degree rape and assault with intent to murder. He was expected to be released from the detention center, which houses adult crime suspects, today, said his brother Bobby Johnson, 29."
NEWS
By Dennis O'Brien and Dennis O'Brien,Sun Staff Writer | May 18, 1995
Twenty-nine professional employees of the Anne Arundel County state's attorney's office will attend an overnight retreat this weekend in Port Deposit.The retreat at the Donaldson Brown Center will cost $2,900, or $100 for each participant, said Kristin Riggin, an office spokeswoman. She said the retreat is intended as a strategic planning session and will be paid for from the office's $4,000 annual budget for staff meetings and training."The focus is going to be how can we make certain aspects of the office work better and how can we better serve the public," she said.
NEWS
By Julie Bykowicz and Julie Bykowicz,SUN STAFF | March 24, 2002
A complex domestic violence case brought against a Howard County police corporal by his estranged wife is budding into a feud between the Police Department and the Carroll County state's attorney's office, which was specially appointed to prosecute the charges. During a heated preliminary hearing Friday, Carroll County prosecutors said the Howard County Police Department was biased in its investigation of Cpl. Michael K. Williams, who is accused of threatening his estranged wife with a gun. The felony assault charge alleges that the corporal pointed a gun at Elizabeth Williams on Oct. 20 and demanded she drop another set of charges she filed against him in September.
NEWS
By Laurie Willis and Laurie Willis,SUN STAFF | August 17, 2001
Baltimore prosecutors dropped murder charges against two men yesterday after the case against them fell apart when a judge found that the state's attorney's office had failed to turn over crucial evidence to their attorneys. Circuit Judge Wanda K. Heard ruled testimony by a star witness and other evidence inadmissible as a result of prosecutors' mistakes. With their case crippled, prosecutors said they had no choice but to drop the charges. Deputy State's Attorney Haven Kodeck acknowledged last night that his office had made a "mistake" and did not criticize Heard.
NEWS
By Devon Spurgeon and Devon Spurgeon,SUN STAFF | November 17, 1999
Staring straight ahead at the judge who will decide his fate, David A. Dicus listened intently as the state's attorney described him as a calculating killer who on a warm summer night nearly four years ago strangled his wife and dumped her body in a field.Dicus showed little emotion during the 3 1/2 hours of closing arguments yesterday in Anne Arundel County Circuit Court. With his long hair cut for the trial, Dicus briefly smiled at his 15-year-old son, Lucas, who was sitting behind him fidgeting and scribbling into a spiral notebook.
NEWS
By Marina Sarris and Jay Apperson and Marina Sarris and Jay Apperson,Sun Staff Writers Sun staff writer David Michael Ettlin contributed to this report | January 6, 1995
Gov.-elect Parris N. Glendening will name Baltimore State's Attorney Stuart O. Simms to his Cabinet as secretary of juvenile justice, according to sources in both the incoming and departing administrations.Mr. Simms was unopposed in his re-election as the city's top prosecutor two months ago. He is expected to be named next week to head the agency, which has more than 1,000 employees and a budget of $108 million, the sources said. He would replace Mary Ann Saar.He would lead a high-profile agency that provides programs, including incarceration, for thousands of delinquent youngsters.
NEWS
June 21, 2007
State didn't object to question on bias The Sun's article "Race a factor in overturned conviction" (June 16) discussed my decision to submit a motion for a new trial in case of State vs. Erik Stoddard. While the reporter was unable to obtain comment from the assistant public defender who actually handled the case, she did speak with his supervisor, Bridget Duffy Shepherd, the chief public defender for Baltimore Circuit Court. Ms. Shepherd defended the request for a new trial by claiming, "I don't know why the state's attorney didn't want [the racial bias question]
NEWS
By Todd Richissin and Todd Richissin,SUN STAFF | April 7, 1999
The attorney for a man wrongly imprisoned for more than seven years warned yesterday that he will sue the state unless Gov. Parris N. Glendening grants a pardon and the state agrees to pay the man hundreds of thousands of dollars.The warning was issued a day after a House of Delegates committee killed a bill that would have paid Anthony Gray Jr. $7.5 million.The 31-year-old Calvert County man was jailed for 7 1/2 years in the killing of a Chesapeake Beach woman. He had been sentenced to life in prison but was released last month.
NEWS
By Molly Knight and Molly Knight,SUN STAFF | November 13, 2003
The state's highest court ordered a reprimand yesterday of Montgomery County State's Attorney Douglas F. Gansler for remarks he made to the media that the Attorney Grievance Commission argued could have tainted cases. The decision marks the first time the Maryland Court of Appeals has disciplined an attorney for breaching the Maryland Rules of Professional Conduct. In a unanimous opinion, the court stated that between 2000 and 2001, Gansler violated those rules when he "spoke outside of the court about matters that had substantial likelihood of depriving several criminal defendants of fair trials."
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