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NEWS
By JENNIFER MCMENAMIN and JENNIFER MCMENAMIN,SUN REPORTER | July 1, 2006
He may be Baltimore's most recognizable lawyer, having beckoned potential clients with TV ads that proclaimed "Let's talk about it" for so long that strangers now approach him with the catchphrase. After a 37-year legal career, primarily representing plaintiffs in personal-injury cases, Stephen L. Miles wants to talk about something else: He's running for Baltimore County state's attorney. "It's time to give back at this stage in my career," the 63-year-old county native said. "It sounds corny, I know.
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NEWS
By Rona Kobell and Rona Kobell,SUN STAFF | September 23, 2003
The second of two suspects in the fatal carjacking that stunned the Annapolis historic district last year is expected to be released from jail today, pending appeal of a judge's recent ruling that prosecutors could not use his alleged confession against him in court. Terrence Tolbert's trial on first-degree murder charges was to have begun today. But prosecutors had to change their plans after Anne Arundel County Circuit Judge Ronald A. Silkworth threw out statements - including a written account of the crime - that Tolbert made to Annapolis police detectives.
NEWS
By Bruce Reid and Bruce Reid,Evening Sun Staff | August 9, 1991
A multimillion-dollar civil claim against the operators and teachers at the former Bo Peep Day Nursery in Bel Air, where it was alleged that as many as 10 children were molested, could be argued in court for years, attorneys say.Parents of four of the children are seeking more than $400 million in damages. The parents, in the 18-count claim against former Bo Peep owners Deborah and Patrick Cassilly and two former teachers, allege negligence, assault, false imprisonment and other charges.The children, according to the suit, "continue to suffer nightmares, anxiety, depression, crying spells and an array of fears and phobias."
NEWS
July 14, 1999
Prosecutor's office is open and effective and respects the lawAs the state's attorney for Baltimore, I have been and continue to be accessible and accountable. I attend community meetings, return telephone calls and respond to media and citizen inquiries. I am an honest, hardworking public servant who represents the citizens of Baltimore in a competent and responsible fashion.The Sun has interviewed me numerous times. I am the only individual in city government who has opened up her office and life to a Sun reporter.
NEWS
By Thom Loverro and Thom Loverro,Sun Staff Correspondent | October 18, 1990
UPPER MARLBORO -- For most of his adult life, Arthur A. "Bud" Marshall was not just state's attorney for Prince George's County, he was the law. The post was not just a job for him; it was who he was.Four years ago, a young black attorney named Alexander Williams Jr. stripped Mr. Marshall of that identity when he defeated the six-term incumbent in a landmark upset victory, the first countywide black official elected to office in the white-dominated county.Life...
NEWS
By Alan J. Craver and Alan J. Craver,Sun Staff Writer | July 12, 1994
An experienced prosecutor and executive director of the Maryland State's Attorneys Association, Dario Joseph Broccolino describes himself as an outsider with no special-interest ties to the county's criminal justice system.Those qualities, he said, make him an ideal candidate for Howard County state's attorney.Mr. Broccolino, 49, of Ellicott City, filed to enter the Democratic race for state's attorney on July 5, the last day the county Board of Elections accepted filings.If elected, said Mr. Broccolino, said he would put the concerns of victims and citizens before the interests of defense attorneys, judges and police officers.
NEWS
By Jennifer McMenamin and Jennifer McMenamin,sun reporter | December 28, 2006
She took over an office beset by scandal, corruption, political influence and the reputation of being an old boys' club. After only a dozen years on the job, she had become such a fixture as an elected official that would-be challengers just gave up trying to unseat her. And she has stood firmly behind her policy on capital punishment, even as it pushed her office into the national death penalty debate for seeking death sentences more often than any...
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel and Andrea F. Siegel,andrea.siegel@baltsun.com | December 13, 2009
Six lawyers, two of them career criminal prosecutors and one a former judge who lost a previous election, will be considered to replace a judge who retired last summer from the Anne Arundel County Circuit Court bench. Sixteen people applied, and the Judicial Nominating Commission for the county winnowed the applicants down last week. Gov. Martin O'Malley must appoint someone from the panel's list, though he can also reopen the process to generate a new list. Whoever is appointed will have a short time on the job before needing to win election next year to keep it, provided the appointment is made before the filing deadline in July for November's election.
NEWS
By Elaine Tassy and Elaine Tassy,SUN STAFF | October 28, 1996
They are the lawyers in limbo on the ladder to litigation.Julie Marindin, Brian Thompson and Marc L. Zayon graduated from the University of Baltimore School of Law in December and passed the bar in June. They could find jobs at big firms, if they wanted.Instead, these doctors of jurisprudence earn $24,000 as law clerks in the Baltimore County state's attorney's office, waiting for prosecutors' jobs to open.The only full-fledged lawyers now working as law clerks for state prosecutors in the Baltimore metropolitan region, they routinely tote carts full of files down the hall, sit in court next to seasoned prosecutors, do research for attorneys and handle simple matters before judges.
NEWS
By From staff reports | May 9, 1998
The principal of a Pasadena high school suspended an evening recreation program yesterday after a melee Thursday that ended in gunfire and led to the arrest of nine suspects.Harry Calendar, principal of Chesapeake Senior High School in the 4700 block of Mountain Road, suspended Open Gym, an after-school program operated by the Department of Recreation and Parks that usually attracts 50 to 75 youths.The program was suspended after a dispute between two students escalated into a brawl with about 75 people, police said.
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