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By Allison Klein and Allison Klein,SUN STAFF | July 18, 2002
Gov. Parris N. Glendening named two assistant state's attorneys - one an Asian-American, the other an openly gay woman - as judges to the Baltimore City District Court yesterday, saying the appointments are "breaking down barriers." Jeannie Hong will become the first Asian-American judge in Maryland history, and Halee Weinstein becomes one of the state's few openly gay judges. They fill the vacancies created on the city bench by the retirements of Teaette S. Price and John P. Miller. "This is an historic occasion as we continue our commitment to ensure that the Maryland judiciary is truly representative of the people it serves," Glendening said in a prepared statement.
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NEWS
September 21, 2011
UPPER MARLBORO, Md — Two police officers were indicted Tuesday in the beating of a University of Maryland student during a rowdy celebration that was caught on video after the school's basketball win over Duke last year, prosecutors said. Prince George's County Officers Reginald Baker and James Harrison, both of the department's special operations division, were indicted on charges of first- and second-degree assault and misconduct in office, said County State's Attorney Angela Alsobrooks.
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NEWS
By Tom Pelton and Tom Pelton,SUN STAFF | February 20, 1998
State Prosecutor Stephen Montanarelli has found no grounds for criminal charges against the Anne Arundel County state's attorney's office for its controversial handling of a $500,000-a-year drug-asset forfeiture program.Montanarelli said in a letter written Tuesday that the Maryland Attorney Grievance Commission is investigating whether any of the Anne Arundel County prosecutors who ran the program violated the legal profession's code of conduct.The commission has the power to recommend to the state courts discipline or disbarment of lawyers.
NEWS
By Tyeesha Dixon and Tyeesha Dixon,tyeesha.dixon@baltsun.com | December 28, 2008
Shirley Harbin has worked as director of the victim witness assistance unit for the Howard County state's attorney's office for the past decade. The job of helping crime victims prepare for court proceedings may prove stressful at times. To stay inspired, Harbin says she relies on her history with the office, her supportive staff and her passion for helping others through what sometimes proves to be the most painful experience they've ever faced. Harbin oversees a staff of three - two victim advocates and a support staffer.
SPORTS
By Christian Ewell and Christian Ewell,SUN STAFF | August 6, 1998
UPPER MARLBORO -- Ten days before the University of Maryland football team begins practice, the state's attorney's office has decided not to continue with assault charges against linebacker Eric Barton.The decision, approved during a preliminary hearing yesterday morning by Prince George's County Circuit Court Judge C. Phillip Nichols Jr., was made pending further evidence.Barton, 21, was scheduled to stand trial Tuesday of next week on one charge of felony assault, two charges of misdemeanor assault and two charges of reckless endangerment following a May 1 incident on the university's campus in College Park.
NEWS
By Patrick Gilbert and Patrick Gilbert,Evening Sun Staff | February 22, 1991
Baltimore State's Attorney Stuart O. Simms says his office may be unable to prosecute car thieves and non-violent juvenile offenders if a budgetary shortfall forces the layoffs of 21 prosecutors and six support personnel.Mayor Kurt Schmoke has ordered that the state's attorney's budget -- $10.17 million -- not be increased for fiscal year 1992, beginning July 1.The city faces a $54.1 million deficit in fiscal 1992 and Schmoke has ordered most departments not to increase their budgets.Simms told a City Council committee yesterday that an additional $1.3 million is needed to avert layoffs.
NEWS
By Eric Siegel and Eric Siegel,Staff Writer | November 5, 1993
Saying Baltimore's courts and prosecutors were "overburdened," Mayor Kurt L. Schmoke said yesterday that the city would make a "big push" during the 1994 General Assembly to have the state begin to phase-in a takeover of the Baltimore Circuit Court and city state's attorney's office."
NEWS
May 25, 1999
STATE'S ATTORNEY Patricia C. Jessamy says insufficient funds may force her to delay for another year a crucial reform to unclog Baltimore's gridlocked courts."
NEWS
By Allison Klein and Allison Klein,SUN STAFF | February 14, 2002
Baltimore State's Attorney Patricia C. Jessamy announced yesterday that her office is in a "crisis" that could cause a "critical threat to public safety" because of an anticipated loss of $2.7 million in state and federal funding. Without that money, she said, her office risks losing 21 prosecutors and 31 support staff, including 14 lawyers who prosecute gun crimes. But city and state officials said it's too early in the state's budgetary process to tell whether the state's attorney's office will get the $1.7 million it has requested from the General Assembly to pay prosecutors in the gun unit.
NEWS
By Lisa Goldberg and Lisa Goldberg,SUN STAFF | February 20, 2003
The Howard County Circuit Courthouse is about to get some breathing room - about 6,300 square feet of it. The state's attorney's office plans to move to roomier offices down the street in the Carroll Building next month, freeing a two-level corner in the chronically cramped building that court officials say will quickly be filled. While the changes will mean more room for the sheriff's office, one of the county's masters and other employees, court officials will have to make do with the space as is. A renovation that would rehab the space to create a fully functional courtroom, an additional master's hearing room and more jury rooms is planned.
NEWS
By LAURA MCCANDLISH and LAURA MCCANDLISH,SUN REPORTER | June 18, 2006
Carroll County officials acknowledge that the county has a gang problem that has involved the Crips, the Bloods, MS-13 and Vatos Locos. Gang incidents have been largely intertwined with expanding illegal drug operations in the county during the last few years, officials said. "They're very much interrelated," said Jennifer L. Darby, a senior assistant state's attorney for the county. "Not every drug dealer is a gang member; not every gang member is a drug dealer. But they do go hand in hand."
NEWS
By Ted Shelsby and Ted Shelsby,SUN STAFF | July 11, 2003
The Harford County Child Advocacy Center has filed child sexual abuse charges against a 62-year-old fourth-grade teacher at Harford Day School in Bel Air. In a news release announcing the center's action, the Harford state's attorney's office said that Daniel E. Harner was taken into custody Wednesday and charged with four counts: child abuse, third-degree sex offense, fourth-degree sex offense and second-degree assault. He is accused of fondling an 11-year-old male pupil at the school Monday, according to the state's attorney's office.
NEWS
By Lisa Goldberg and Lisa Goldberg,SUN STAFF | February 20, 2003
The Howard County Circuit Courthouse is about to get some breathing room - about 6,300 square feet of it. The state's attorney's office plans to move to roomier offices down the street in the Carroll Building next month, freeing a two-level corner in the chronically cramped building that court officials say will quickly be filled. While the changes will mean more room for the sheriff's office, one of the county's masters and other employees, court officials will have to make do with the space as is. A renovation that would rehab the space to create a fully functional courtroom, an additional master's hearing room and more jury rooms is planned.
NEWS
By Lisa Goldberg and Lisa Goldberg,SUN STAFF | February 20, 2003
The Howard County Circuit Courthouse is about to get some breathing room - about 6,300 square feet of it. The state's attorney's office plans to move to roomier offices down the street in the Carroll Building next month, freeing a two-level corner in the chronically cramped building that court officials say will quickly be filled. While the changes will mean more room for the sheriff's office, one of the county's masters and other employees, court officials will have to make do with the space as is. A renovation that would rehab the space to create a fully functional courtroom, an additional master's hearing room and more jury rooms is planned.
NEWS
By Laurie Willis and Laurie Willis,SUN STAFF | September 19, 2002
In an effort to ensure that Baltimore's growing Hispanic population has access to the state's attorney's programs and services, the office now translates part of its Web site into Spanish. And public announcements about indictments, convictions and other judicial matters will be translated into Spanish upon request, said Haydee Rodriguez, a district court community coordinator for the state's attorney's office. Rodriguez said State's Attorney Patricia C. Jessamy has met with the Hispanic community to "hear their concerns," and wants to "ensure that we are as inclusive as possible in our outreach to the citizens of Baltimore."
NEWS
By Allison Klein and Allison Klein,SUN STAFF | August 25, 2002
Baltimore voters are being treated to a spectacle they haven't seen in 20 years: a battle for the job of the city's top prosecutor. Not since 1982 has a Baltimore state's attorney had a challenger. And this year's candidates, who have repeatedly squared off, are providing enough political venom to make up for lost time. After three months of campaigning, there's no clear front-runner among the candidates - embattled incumbent Patricia C. Jessamy, longtime lawyer Anton J.S. Keating and City Councilwoman Lisa Joi Stancil.
NEWS
By Lisa Goldberg and Lisa Goldberg,SUN STAFF | February 20, 2003
The Howard County Circuit Courthouse is about to get some breathing room - about 6,300 square feet of it. The state's attorney's office plans to move to roomier offices down the street in the Carroll Building next month, freeing a two-level corner in the chronically cramped building that court officials say will quickly be filled. While the changes will mean more room for the sheriff's office, one of the county's masters and other employees, court officials will have to make do with the space as is. A renovation that would rehab the space to create a fully functional courtroom, an additional master's hearing room and more jury rooms is planned.
NEWS
By ELISE ARMACOST | July 2, 1995
The cookie never crumbles the right way for Anne Arundel County State's Attorney Frank Weathersbee, does it?He's an experienced and credible prosecutor, yet his whole career has been dogged by the perception that he's soft, that he lets the big fish get away more often than a prosecutor ought.He enjoyed a brief respite from his travails after last November's election, when he held onto his job despite being a Democrat in a year when Democrats were as popular as cyanide, and despite a no-holds-barred challenge by an opponent who made him sound as if he were giving criminals keys to the detention center.
NEWS
By Allison Klein and Allison Klein,SUN STAFF | July 18, 2002
Gov. Parris N. Glendening named two assistant state's attorneys - one an Asian-American, the other an openly gay woman - as judges to the Baltimore City District Court yesterday, saying the appointments are "breaking down barriers." Jeannie Hong will become the first Asian-American judge in Maryland history, and Halee Weinstein becomes one of the state's few openly gay judges. They fill the vacancies created on the city bench by the retirements of Teaette S. Price and John P. Miller. "This is an historic occasion as we continue our commitment to ensure that the Maryland judiciary is truly representative of the people it serves," Glendening said in a prepared statement.
NEWS
By Allison Klein and Allison Klein,SUN STAFF | June 25, 2002
A lawyer for the man accused of shooting a Baltimore priest launched a shouting tirade yesterday outside the Clarence M. Mitchell Jr. Courthouse, saying the city state's attorney is not investigating allegations that his client was molested by the priest. Hollering insults about prosecutors through a bullhorn, attorney Warren A. Brown stood alongside the family of the accused man, Dontee Stokes, 27. "The state's attorney's office is trying to whitewash this investigation," said Brown, who claims he came up with the bullhorn approach because his letters requesting a meeting with State's Attorney Patricia C. Jessamy have gone unanswered.
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