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NEWS
July 14, 1999
Prosecutor's office is open and effective and respects the lawAs the state's attorney for Baltimore, I have been and continue to be accessible and accountable. I attend community meetings, return telephone calls and respond to media and citizen inquiries. I am an honest, hardworking public servant who represents the citizens of Baltimore in a competent and responsible fashion.The Sun has interviewed me numerous times. I am the only individual in city government who has opened up her office and life to a Sun reporter.
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NEWS
August 11, 2010
Correct me if I'm wrong, but I was of the mindset that the State's Attorney and Baltimore City Police Commissioner work for the "same team", so to speak. What Patricia C. Jessamy is doing by her incendiary comments is to create a large, permanent impassable chasm between herself and Commissioner Bealefeld ("Jessamy calls for probe of Bealefeld," Aug. 11). Ms. Jessamy is taking this issue to a very personal and juvenile level. This certainly does not bode well for the city of Baltimore for the next few months (at least until election day)
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NEWS
By Elaine Tassy and Elaine Tassy,SUN STAFF | November 23, 1995
James Allan Kulbicki, a former Baltimore police sergeant, was convicted of first-degree murder last night in the 1993 killing of 22-year-old Gina Marie Nueslein, with whom he had a three-year adulterous affair that bore a son.In the retrial, a jury of nine men and three women took less than three hours to return its verdict, which included a conviction for handgun use in a felony. Kulbicki, who faces a life term without the possibility of parole, will be sentenced Dec. 18.After the verdict was read, Jennifer Nueslein, the victim's 18-year-old sister, cried.
NEWS
By Larry Carson, The Baltimore Sun | July 11, 2010
Howard County State's Attorney Dario Broccolino is relieved to find himself the only incumbent in the county without an opponent in this year's elections, and it's not just because he has no money for a campaign. Although a Democrat, the low-profile Broccolino sees his job as nonpartisan law enforcement and preaches that straight-ahead approach to his staff lawyers when they prosecute cases. Getting a full four-year term in office without having to campaign for it helps that stance, he said, and he's "very pleased."
NEWS
December 16, 1996
THERE IS little excuse when a convicted felon is set free because prosecutors make foolish and avoidable mistakes. Within the past three years, the Anne Arundel County state's attorney's office has had two convictions reversed because prosecutors did not try the cases in a timely fashion.In the most recent incident, Ronald Johnson, who had been found guilty by a jury of breaking into the Maxway discount store in Brooklyn Park, was freed because of a prosecutor's inattention to the state's "Hicks Rule."
NEWS
By Amy Oakes and Amy Oakes,SUN STAFF | March 17, 1999
The Baltimore state's attorney dropped charges against an HIV-positive West Baltimore man who had been accused of kidnapping and raping a woman in May.Deputy State's Attorney Sharon A. H. May said Ronald A. Jackson Sr., 50, was released Friday after results of DNA testing proved he could not have committed the crime. "The DNA excluded the defendant," May said.Details of the DNA testing were not available yesterday.Jackson, who lives in the 800 block of W. Saratoga St., could not be reached yesterday to comment.
NEWS
By David Michael Ettlin and David Michael Ettlin,SUN STAFF | February 13, 2003
Milton Burke Allen, Baltimore's first black state's attorney who also defended and tried criminal defendants as a lawyer and judge in a career that spanned four decades, died of cardiac arrest yesterday at his Windsor Hills home. He was 85. When he was elected in 1970 as state's attorney, Mr. Allen became the first African-American elected to citywide office - other than a judgeship - and the first black person to hold a chief prosecutor's position in a major U.S. city. Born in Baltimore, he was the son of Claude Mercell and Minnie Magee Allen.
NEWS
July 5, 1992
Prosecutor hires 2WESTMINSTER -- The daughter of former Baltimore Colts coach Ted Marchibroda and a veteran state police investigator are the two newest members of the State's Attorney's Office.State's Attorney Thomas E. Hickman on Thursday announced that Lonni Marchibroda, 33, is the newest assistant state's attorney and James M. Leete, 50, will serve as the office's second criminal investigator. Both people started their jobs Wednesday.Ms. Marchibroda most recently was an attorney in an Annapolis firm before joining the Carroll office.
NEWS
By Caitlin Francke and Caitlin Francke,SUN STAFF | July 25, 1996
Another prosecutor in the Howard County state's attorney's office has resigned, the fifth to leave the office since February under the administration of State's Attorney Marna McLendon.Gail D. Kessler, who practiced law in District Court for the past 19 months, will be joining the Maryland Attorney Grievance Commission to work as an assistant bar counsel. Her resignation, submitted Friday, takes effect Aug. 2.Kessler, 33, was hired by McLendon when McLendon took office in January 1995. Kessler had worked in the Carroll County District Court Division for more than two years before coming to Howard.
NEWS
By Todd Richissin and Todd Richissin,SUN STAFF | February 6, 1999
PRINCE FREDERICK -- The legal travail of Anthony Gray Jr. -- poor, luckless and slow of wit -- began more than seven years ago, when all indications say he was arrested and sentenced to life in prison merely for being in a very frightened place at a very frightening time.On Monday, Gray is likely to be freed from the prison where he has spent the bulk of his adult life.In an extraordinary admission, the Calvert County state's attorney will tell a judge here that prosecutors made a horrible mistake: No convincing evidence exists that Gray committed the murder that has kept him behind bars.
NEWS
July 7, 2010
The first sentence of Jean Marbella's piece ("Jessamy draws challenger to re-election," July 5) said it all: Four mayors, six police commissioners and one chief prosecutor over the past 15 years. Time to let someone else see if a better job can be done, having in mind plea deals accepted and numerous excuses over the years for cases either not pursued or lost for various reasons. With his experience as a former federal prosecutor, Gregg Bernstein should be given an opportunity to show a better job can be done in the position.
NEWS
By Don Markus, The Baltimore Sun | May 20, 2010
Called for jury duty for the third time that he can remember, Dario Broccolino doesn't know why he wasn't picked Thursday to hear a personal injury complaint stemming from an automobile accident. Maybe because he's the top prosecutor for Howard County? "I have no idea which side didn't want me on the jury," Broccolino said. "There's a million different reasons why you want someone on a jury or don't want them on a jury, what perceptions or preconceived ideas you have." Broccolino walked into the courtroom of Circuit Judge Timothy McCrone — his predecessor and former boss — not as Howard County state's attorney but as a citizen called to meet a civic obligation.
NEWS
By Nick Madigan and Nick Madigan,nick.madigan@baltsun.com | January 20, 2010
A former Baltimore County prosecutor who works as an attorney in Towson has been charged with carjacking and armed robbery in connection with an incident last week near his home. Isaiah Dixon III, 54, who worked as an assistant state's attorney for almost eight years until July 1997, was arrested Monday after police say he ran from officers on Belle Avenue in Northwest Baltimore. A police spokesman said the officers had converged there after a man was spotted driving a 2009 Honda Accord that had been taken at gunpoint Friday from its owner, a 31-year-old woman.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel and Andrea F. Siegel,andrea.siegel@baltsun.com | December 13, 2009
Six lawyers, two of them career criminal prosecutors and one a former judge who lost a previous election, will be considered to replace a judge who retired last summer from the Anne Arundel County Circuit Court bench. Sixteen people applied, and the Judicial Nominating Commission for the county winnowed the applicants down last week. Gov. Martin O'Malley must appoint someone from the panel's list, though he can also reopen the process to generate a new list. Whoever is appointed will have a short time on the job before needing to win election next year to keep it, provided the appointment is made before the filing deadline in July for November's election.
NEWS
By Tricia Bishop and Tricia Bishop,tricia.bishop@baltsun.com | September 13, 2009
As soon as Maryland's Gang Prosecution Act went into effect in 2007, prosecutors in Harford County tested it, filing charges against a group that had stabbed and beaten a man. But when prosecutors couldn't show how the attack had furthered a criminal conspiracy, as required under the new law, the judge balked. They had to drop the gang charges and move forward with simple assault. "It's a very unworkable statute. ... Most prosecutors haven't really bothered to do anything with it," said Harford County State's Attorney Joseph I. Cassilly, who contends that the law is watered-down and useless.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel and Andrea F. Siegel,andrea.siegel@baltsun.com | July 15, 2009
Frank R. Weathersbee, Anne Arundel County's longtime chief prosecutor, said he plans to seek a sixth term in office, one that would make him among the longest-tenured state's attorneys in Maryland. The Democrat has not set a timetable for announcing his 2010 candidacy, when he expects to bring out the "Weathersbee for State's Attorney" signs from previous campaigns. Weathersbee, 65, has been a key player in the county's criminal justice system through more than a generation. In addition to specialized investigation and prosecution units, the office has programs to divert criminal cases from court.
NEWS
By Lisa Goldberg and Lisa Goldberg,SUN STAFF | November 4, 2002
I. Matthew Campbell, the well-regarded Howard County deputy state's attorney who won convictions on some of the office's highest-profile cases during his nearly four-year tenure, will leave the office this month to litigate securities fraud cases through a quasi-governmental nonprofit organization. Campbell, who joined the Howard state's attorney's office in 1999 after spending nearly a quarter-century investigating and prosecuting cases in Montgomery County, said a job opportunity with the National Association of Securities Dealers "kind of landed on" him a few weeks ago. Although politics was not the "determining factor" in his decision to leave, State's Attorney Marna L. McLendon's decision not to seek re-election this year did weigh on his mind, he said.
NEWS
By Del Quentin Wilber and Del Quentin Wilber,SUN STAFF | May 4, 1999
During the murder-for-hire trials of Ruthann Aron, defense attorneys threw complicated psychological testimony at Montgomery County prosecutor I. Matthew Campbell.But Campbell had done his homework -- and eventually won a conviction."Here you had a state's attorney who spends his whole career learning criminal issues and having to essentially learn the whole area of psychiatry," said Circuit Court Judge Paul A. McGuckian, who oversaw Aron's first trial. "He did as well as any medical malpractice lawyer," McGuckian said.
NEWS
By Tricia Bishop and Tricia Bishop,tricia.bishop@baltsun.com | June 24, 2009
A federal judge denied a Westminster woman's request to withdraw her guilty plea Tuesday and sentenced her to 10 years in prison for sex trafficking of a minor, a 17-year-old cousin whose sexual services she sold under the Internet heading "Available now." Deborah Gail Frock, who was previously convicted of trying to blackmail a state prosecutor, claimed that the government coerced her to take the plea agreement by outlining plans to file additional charges that carried a minimum 30-year sentence if she didn't accept the deal.
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