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NEWS
January 14, 2000
DOCUMENTED Russian history really got its start with the conversion of pagan tribes to Christianity about A.D. 987. After the Romanov dynasty was established six centuries later, czars became not only titular heads of the Orthodox Church, but, in many cases, were elevated to sainthood. After the atheistic Bolsheviks grabbed power in 1917, they did their best to stamp out religion, often ruthlessly. But the Soviet Union is gone, and the Orthodox Church is reacquiring its position as the state religion.
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NEWS
May 18, 2011
As a 1960 graduate of the U.S. Naval Academy, I take grave exception to Talbot Manvel's op-ed page commentary on mealtime prayers at our military institutions ("Naval Academy tradition vs. Constitution," May 17). If he does not like to subject himself to the prayers, he is free to take a walk to another academic institution that has less respect for any sort of expression of feeling toward a Supreme Being. He could wear ear plugs to the mess hall, go into his muddled head, or simply tune out. No one is forcing him to stay at the Naval Academy.
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NEWS
February 2, 2011
Katharine W. Rylaarsdam wrongly argues that Senate President Thomas V. Mike Miller's stance on gay marriage isn't protected free speech ( "Miller's stance on gay marriage isn't protected free speech," Jan. 31). The First Amendment was written into the Constitution to insure the United States didn't establish a state religion, as was the case in England. Mr. Miller has the right to state his position on gay marriage. What I can't understand is how someone who has this view wouldn't use all the power of his position to support it. A big part of the problem with the United States today is a lot of people are trying to do away with God. This country was a much better place when it respected God. The United States has tried to slowly do away with God. The result the United States has slowly slipped from the world power it was. Say what you want, but you know its true.
NEWS
February 2, 2011
Katharine W. Rylaarsdam wrongly argues that Senate President Thomas V. Mike Miller's stance on gay marriage isn't protected free speech ( "Miller's stance on gay marriage isn't protected free speech," Jan. 31). The First Amendment was written into the Constitution to insure the United States didn't establish a state religion, as was the case in England. Mr. Miller has the right to state his position on gay marriage. What I can't understand is how someone who has this view wouldn't use all the power of his position to support it. A big part of the problem with the United States today is a lot of people are trying to do away with God. This country was a much better place when it respected God. The United States has tried to slowly do away with God. The result the United States has slowly slipped from the world power it was. Say what you want, but you know its true.
NEWS
By Matthew Ladner | October 22, 2001
AUSTIN - The U.S. Supreme Court has agreed to rule on what will undoubtedly be the most closely watched and most controversial case of the year - the constitutionality of school vouchers. The case involves the Cleveland Scholarship and Tuition Program, which the Ohio legislature created in 1995 to permit low-income families in the state's lowest-performing school district to choose a public or private school. The case has the potential to settle the lingering question of whether school voucher programs like Cleveland's violate separation of church and state.
NEWS
May 18, 2011
As a 1960 graduate of the U.S. Naval Academy, I take grave exception to Talbot Manvel's op-ed page commentary on mealtime prayers at our military institutions ("Naval Academy tradition vs. Constitution," May 17). If he does not like to subject himself to the prayers, he is free to take a walk to another academic institution that has less respect for any sort of expression of feeling toward a Supreme Being. He could wear ear plugs to the mess hall, go into his muddled head, or simply tune out. No one is forcing him to stay at the Naval Academy.
NEWS
By ANDREW CLINE | January 2, 2006
Federal Judge John E. Jones III, a George W. Bush appointee, has ruled unconstitutional the referencing of intelligent design in public school science classes in Dover, Pa. He called it a "mere re-labeling of creationism" and said it amounted to an unconstitutional establishment of religion. Which raises a question: How intelligently designed are public schools in which intelligent design cannot even be referenced? Unlike the Scopes case of 1925, the Dover case did not involve politicians yanking evolution from the classroom and replacing it with creationism.
FEATURES
By Arthur Hirsch and Arthur Hirsch,SUN STAFF | July 4, 1996
People who don't like crabs? Babette Brady is struggling with the concept. Let's get this right -- you're looking for people who don't like crabs?"You better go to a different state," says Brady, reacting as if you said you're looking for people with three nostrils.You can't blame her. Her family owns Crabtowne USA Inc. in Glen Burnie, where giant inflatable crabs hang from the ceiling, where customers look for the sign of the big, red smiling crab on Crain Highway, where the message board out front lately announces: "ALL YOU CAN EAT CRABS $20.00 PERSON 6-10 p.m."
NEWS
By GARRY WILLS | November 22, 1994
Chicago.--Once there was a politician who got into a car wreck. His first political instinct was to get out of the car and shake the hand of every bystander.That seems to have been Bill Clinton's reaction to the great car wreck of an election he got caught in. Unfortunately, the first hand he came to for shaking was Pat Robertson's.Warned by Newt Gingrich that the White House must now compromise with Congress, President Clinton went in for some pre-emptive groveling to the Religious Right, saying that he might support a prayer-in-school amendment if the prayer were voluntary.
NEWS
By George F. Custen | July 22, 1998
AS HOLLYWOOD's century draws to a close, the culture wars with which it opened abide and endure. Although most Americans do not realize it, 1998 marks the 83rd anniversary of the most important event in the history of American film. This key battle was not fought in Hollywood, but in Washington. There, a 1915 Supreme Court ruling, in conjunction with two factors unique to this country -- the absence of an official national language or state religion -- shaped film in a way that it came to play a role so powerful that our culture deemed it worth fighting over.
NEWS
By ANDREW CLINE | January 2, 2006
Federal Judge John E. Jones III, a George W. Bush appointee, has ruled unconstitutional the referencing of intelligent design in public school science classes in Dover, Pa. He called it a "mere re-labeling of creationism" and said it amounted to an unconstitutional establishment of religion. Which raises a question: How intelligently designed are public schools in which intelligent design cannot even be referenced? Unlike the Scopes case of 1925, the Dover case did not involve politicians yanking evolution from the classroom and replacing it with creationism.
NEWS
By Matthew Ladner | October 22, 2001
AUSTIN - The U.S. Supreme Court has agreed to rule on what will undoubtedly be the most closely watched and most controversial case of the year - the constitutionality of school vouchers. The case involves the Cleveland Scholarship and Tuition Program, which the Ohio legislature created in 1995 to permit low-income families in the state's lowest-performing school district to choose a public or private school. The case has the potential to settle the lingering question of whether school voucher programs like Cleveland's violate separation of church and state.
NEWS
January 14, 2000
DOCUMENTED Russian history really got its start with the conversion of pagan tribes to Christianity about A.D. 987. After the Romanov dynasty was established six centuries later, czars became not only titular heads of the Orthodox Church, but, in many cases, were elevated to sainthood. After the atheistic Bolsheviks grabbed power in 1917, they did their best to stamp out religion, often ruthlessly. But the Soviet Union is gone, and the Orthodox Church is reacquiring its position as the state religion.
NEWS
By George F. Custen | July 22, 1998
AS HOLLYWOOD's century draws to a close, the culture wars with which it opened abide and endure. Although most Americans do not realize it, 1998 marks the 83rd anniversary of the most important event in the history of American film. This key battle was not fought in Hollywood, but in Washington. There, a 1915 Supreme Court ruling, in conjunction with two factors unique to this country -- the absence of an official national language or state religion -- shaped film in a way that it came to play a role so powerful that our culture deemed it worth fighting over.
FEATURES
By Arthur Hirsch and Arthur Hirsch,SUN STAFF | July 4, 1996
People who don't like crabs? Babette Brady is struggling with the concept. Let's get this right -- you're looking for people who don't like crabs?"You better go to a different state," says Brady, reacting as if you said you're looking for people with three nostrils.You can't blame her. Her family owns Crabtowne USA Inc. in Glen Burnie, where giant inflatable crabs hang from the ceiling, where customers look for the sign of the big, red smiling crab on Crain Highway, where the message board out front lately announces: "ALL YOU CAN EAT CRABS $20.00 PERSON 6-10 p.m."
NEWS
By GARRY WILLS | November 22, 1994
Chicago.--Once there was a politician who got into a car wreck. His first political instinct was to get out of the car and shake the hand of every bystander.That seems to have been Bill Clinton's reaction to the great car wreck of an election he got caught in. Unfortunately, the first hand he came to for shaking was Pat Robertson's.Warned by Newt Gingrich that the White House must now compromise with Congress, President Clinton went in for some pre-emptive groveling to the Religious Right, saying that he might support a prayer-in-school amendment if the prayer were voluntary.
NEWS
By Dan Berger | June 21, 2000
High school football is the established state religion of Texas no matter what the Supreme Court may opine. Tiger! Tiger burning bright Down the fairways out of sight, What immortal hand or eye Could frame thy fearful symmetry? The Pier Six Pavillion should be seen and not heard. The New York Times will build itself a new home near the site of the old Herald Tribune. Still playing catch-up.
NEWS
July 6, 1997
THE PUSH BY the parliament in Moscow to restrict the Russian Orthodox Church's rivals is a serious threat to freedom of religion.That the church would seek such recognition is not surprising. From Russia's early history, the Orthodox religion has been not only "the one and only true church," but also an active player in politics. True, it was bloodily suppressed after 1917. But that did not prevent the church from becoming Stalin's ally in the World War II effort against Hitler. In the waning years of communism, prominent clergymen -- many of whom were KGB agents -- also routinely promoted the Kremlin's peace initiatives throughout the world.
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