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By Barry Rascovar | March 9, 1997
HORSE RACING'S sad plight in Maryland gets sadder by the week. Indifference and politically motivated resistance from the Glendening administration; confusion and the lack of a consensus rescue plan on the part of legislators, and the loss of fans and top-flight local thoroughbred trainers to slots-rich Delaware Park combine to make a bleak situation downright ominous.Without some kind of government help this year, Maryland racing's free fall will surely accelerate. This places in grave jeopardy a $1 billion state industry that does far more to encourage and preserve grassy fields and farms than the governor's much-hyped ''smart growth'' land-use bill.
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NEWS
By Ian Duncan, The Baltimore Sun | June 25, 2014
Marilyn J. Mosby defeated Baltimore City State's Attorney Gregg L. Bernstein on Tuesday after criticizing him for failing to live up to promises he made four years ago to win the office. Bernstein conceded shortly before 11:30 p.m. Tuesday. "We have left the office in a much better place," Bernstein said, "an office that is more effective, more efficient and more professional. " When Bernstein took office in 2011 after defeating incumbent Patricia C. Jessamy, he promised to boost conviction rates and focus on violent crime in Baltimore.
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SPORTS
By Jon Morgan and Jon Morgan,Staff Writer | May 7, 1992
There are few sure things in horse racing, but bet on this: Come next year, one of the two biggest names in Maryland racing -- De Francis or Manfuso -- no longer will have a stake in the state's major thoroughbred tracks.Most likely, one of the co-owners of Laurel and Pimlico will buy out the other, removing from track management one of two family names that have dominated Maryland racing since the early 1980s.Breeders, fans and others are watching the looming battle closely, because whoever owns the tracks will determine, to a large degree, the future of the state's troubled racing industry during a time of great change.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | June 17, 2014
Four years after throwing its support behind Gregg Bernstein in his quest to become Baltimore state's attorney, the Baltimore Police union has chosen to stay neutral for his re-election campaign. Robert F. Cherry, the union's president, said a committee of officers recently voted not to endorse Bernstein or his primary election challenger, attorney Marilyn Mosby. He noted that the union stayed neutral in the race eight years ago, and said the decision this time should not be viewed as a lack of support for Bernstein.
SPORTS
By Tom Keyser and Tom Keyser,SUN STAFF | March 12, 2005
Declan's Moon, the undefeated Maryland-bred seen as a potential boost to state racing if not racing nationwide, has suffered an injury that will sideline him until at least the fall. The leading contender for the Kentucky Derby, Declan's Moon injured his left front leg while winning the Santa Catalina Stakes last weekend at Santa Anita Park, said Ron Ellis, his trainer. The 3-year-old gelding suffered a small stress fracture of the radius bone just above the knee, the trainer said. Based at Hollywood Park in Southern California, Ellis said that three veterinarians had examined the horse and studied X-rays of the injury.
SPORTS
By Jon Morgan and Jon Morgan,SUN STAFF | January 29, 2002
Accusations and insults were flying like clumps of muddy hay at the Maryland Racing Commission's four-hour meeting last week. At the center of the swirl stood Martin Jacobs, a 6-foot-tall, balding attorney with a conservative bearing. He was reading aloud a Maryland statute in his Brooklyn-tinged accent, enraging commissioners who were in no mood for a lecture on the law. A behind-the scenes force in the state's horse racing scene for more than two decades, Jacobs, 61, has advised several of the outsized personalities who have shaped the sport while drawing little attention to himself.
NEWS
By David Michael Ettlin and David Michael Ettlin,Sun Staff Writer Sun Staff Writer Ross Peddicord contributed to this article | March 23, 1994
From the time he was 17, entrepreneur Ben Cohen had only himself as a boss -- becoming with his partner and brother Herman a liquidator and builder, and a pioneer in Baltimore television broadcasting.But most of all, he was a noted sportsman -- co-owner for 34 years of Pimlico Race Course, and owner with his wife, Zelda, of many thoroughbreds, including 1965 Belmont Stakes winner Hail All.On Monday at Sinai Hospital, less than a mile from the Pimlico backstretch, Mr. Cohen died of complications of old age. He was 94."
NEWS
February 8, 1991
Services for Robert W. Furtick, retired president of a trucking company and a former member of the State Racing Commission, will be held at 11 a.m. today at the Mitchell-Wiedefeld Home, 6500 York Road.Mr. Furtick, who was 74, died Tuesday after a heart attack at his home on Chapelwood Lane in Lutherville.He retired 12 years ago as president of W. T. Cowan Inc., the trucking company with which he was associated for more than 30 years. He came to the Baltimore area during the early 1940s as plant manager of the Joseph E. Seagram & Sons distillery in Relay after working for the company in Louisville, Ky., and Lawrence, Ind. Mr. Furtick was a former president of the American Trucking Association and of the Maryland Motor Truck Association.
SPORTS
By Ross Peddicord and Ross Peddicord,Sun Staff Writer | May 26, 1995
The last anti-Lasix bastion among major American racing jurisdictions is about to fall.Jerry Bilinski, newly confirmed chairman of the New York State Racing and Wagering Board, announced yesterday that the commission has agreed unanimously to publish a draft rule that could pave the way for Lasix usage at New York tracks by the beginning of the Belmont Park fall meet on Sept. 1.If during the 90-day publication period the rule is not altered or withdrawn, horses running in the Breeders' Cup at Belmont Park Oct. 28 will be able to run on Lasix.
NEWS
May 5, 1997
WHEN LEADERS of the horse-racing industry patched together a temporary relief package at the recent General Assembly session, Gov. Parris N. Glendening was conspicuously silent. Lawmakers bought the industry's argument that state tracks need help to stay competitive with slots-rich tracks in Delaware. Now it is Mr. Glendening's turn to speak out.A four-bill package made it through the legislature, thanks in large part to Sens. Thomas Bromwell and Barbara Hoffman. The bills should ease financial pressure on Laurel and Pimlico and beef up purses that go directly to trainers, jockeys, owners and breeders.
SPORTS
Sports Digest | August 22, 2013
Horses Maryland State Fair racing begins Friday, runs 10 days The Maryland State Fair in Timonium - the only state fair east of the Mississippi River with a sanctioned 10-day thoroughbred meeting - will host live racing beginning Friday at 1:05 p.m. and ending Labor Day. During that run, only Tuesday will be dark. This year's meeting has grown from seven to 10 days after the Maryland Horsemen's Association contributed money to subsidize added programs. Purses also have increased.
SPORTS
By Jeff Seidel and For The Baltimore Sun | December 12, 2012
Coppin State coach Fang Mitchell often can be difficult to please, but even he wore a big smile after Wednesday night's game against UMBC. The Eagles quickly eliminated any suspense, scoring the game's first eight points and making their first eight shots from the field in an 80-61 victory at RAC Arena. Michael Murray had 19 points and 13 rebounds to lead Coppin State (2-8), which snapped a four-game losing streak in the midst of a tough early-season schedule in which 12 of the team's first 15 games are on the road.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | February 5, 2011
When Sidney Hollander Sr., the legendary Baltimore civil rights and social activist, celebrated his 90th birthday in 1972, he reflected on his life's work seeking equality for those who had long been denied it. "I was always warned by my conservative friends that if you give Negroes one finger, they'll want the whole hand," he told a Sun reporter at the time. "That's what I'm for. If they get the whole hand, then they'll finally be equal. "We've broken down a lot of the taboos and restrictions, but we haven't broken down the emotions behind those taboos and restrictions," he said.
BUSINESS
By Hanah Cho, The Baltimore Sun | December 10, 2010
The owners of Maryland's two major thoroughbred tracks proposed Friday to run 77 days of live racing next year at Laurel Park and Pimlico Race Course that would conclude after the Preakness Stakes in May. Meanwhile, the tracks' minority owner, Penn National Gaming, said it would pursue slots at Laurel Park, which means lobbying to change the state constitution to allow a second casino in Anne Arundel County when the General Assembly reconvenes next...
SPORTS
By Bill Dwyer, Tribune Newspapers | November 5, 2010
LOUISVILLE, KY. — At a time when Maryland racing may have most needed a boost, one of its own, Kevin Plank of Sagamore Farms, gave it just that at the Breeders' Cup here Friday. Plank, the multi-millionaire founder and owner of Under Armour, also owned a long shot in the $2 million Filly & Mare Turf. That is the four-year-old filly, Shared Account, who did the near impossible before an opening day Breeders' Cup crowd of 41,614 at historic Churchill Downs. She won the race, at 46-1 odds, paying $94 to win, second-largest in the event's 27-year history, and stunning a field that had all but overlooked her. "I'm speechless," said trainer Graham Motion.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel, The Baltimore Sun | November 5, 2010
Incumbent Anne Arundel County State's Attorney Frank Weathersbee appears to have won a sixth term in a tight contest, after an absentee ballot count increased his lead Friday over his Republican opponent. "I think we won, yes," Weathersbee said Friday night. The additional ballots widened the Democrat's lead over attorney Eric Grannon, who practices mostly antitrust and business law, to 3 percent of the vote from 2 percent. Late-arriving absentee ballots as well as provisional ballots have yet to be counted.
SPORTS
February 28, 1993
Take racing in new directionI would like to address the issue of the racing industry in Maryland. As a fan of racing for more than 30 years, I have witnessed the past five years with mixed emotions. In 1988 we lost Freestate Raceway, and the harness industry is gone from central Maryland.The thoroughbreds were the only game in the Baltimore. They have a higher minimum bet, a concern for the $2 bettor. The De Francis family, for better or worse, was controlling the direction for the state's racing industry.
SPORTS
By Ross Peddicord and Ross Peddicord,Staff Writer | September 26, 1993
The search apparently has been narrowed to two candidates -- one with a background in racing and one with television expertise -- to be named the first so-called national "czar of racing."The board of directors of the Thoroughbred Racing Associations, which represents the bulk of North American thoroughbred tracks, voted at its quarterly meeting in Toronto last week to hire a paid president to assume a commissioner-type role.The TRA's first commissioner of racing is expected be hired by the Nov. 6 Breeders' Cup.The idea is to reorganize the TRA, comprised of 42 tracks including all the major ones in the United States and Canada, and give it a more activist role "so that we'll have a league office staffed with full-time professionals instead of a lot of the work being done by volunteer track owners, who have their own businesses to run," said Pimlico/Laurel operator and TRA director Joe De Francis.
NEWS
By Raven L. Hill, The Baltimore Sun | October 21, 2010
Rebecca L. Nelson will be able to use the Weir family name again on the Nov. 2 general election ballot for the 7th District state Senate seat. After Nelson defeated James G. Stavropoulos Jr. in the September primary election, he questioned the legitimacy of the name she had used on the ballot, "Rebecca Weir Nelson. " Nelson is a cousin of Democratic Del. Michael H. Weir Jr. Stavropoulos accused her of using that name to hide criminal incidents that occurred after her failed 2006 run for the House of Delegates.
NEWS
By Raven L. Hill, The Baltimore Sun | October 14, 2010
In the race for Baltimore County state's attorney, a rematch of the 2006 contest between Scott D. Shellenberger and Stephen Bailey, law-and-order issues have taken a back seat to accusations of wasteful spending. Shellenberger, a first-term Democrat, is promoting his accomplishments, which include carrying out a policy to record inmates' phone calls and prosecuting the state's first fetal homicide case. He is also playing up his role in the county's record-low crime statistics. Bailey, his Republican opponent, agrees that for the most part Shellenberger has done a good job as state's attorney, and he wants to expand some of his initiatives.
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