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By John Fritze and Lynn Anderson and John Fritze and Lynn Anderson,Sun reporters | June 26, 2008
Mayor Sheila Dixon lashed out at prosecutors and reporters yesterday in her first comments since acknowledging having a personal relationship with a developer at the same time that she voted on contracts that benefited his company. In a combative news conference outside City Hall, Dixon vowed "to survive this" and accused the state prosecutor's office of leaking information to the news media that she cannot respond to without harming her own case. Her comments came in conjunction with a push by allies to express public support for the embattled mayor.
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NEWS
By Liz Bowie, The Baltimore Sun | August 21, 2014
State Del. Pat McDonough has asked the Maryland State Prosecutor's Office to investigate whether the Baltimore County school board acted properly when it gave the superintendent an increase in his pay and benefits package of $27,000. McDonough believes Superintendent Dallas Dance's contract prohibits the board from giving the superintendent an increase in compensation that is larger than the teachers'. The board gave Dance a $5,000 raise as well as a $18,200 reimbursement for his contribution into the Maryland state retirement system and a larger payout for unused vacation days.
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NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | May 26, 2000
State prosecutors will officially drop wiretapping charges against Linda R. Tripp on Wednesday. Officials in the Howard County Circuit Court Clerk's office said yesterday that state prosecutors would appear before Judge Diane O. Leasure at 2 p.m. State prosecutors announced they were dropping the case this week after a judicial ruling that severely limited evidence they could present at trial. A state prosecutor will call the case, 38397, and then dismiss the charges. Tripp's attorney, Joseph Murtha, said he likely will not attend the hearing, which should last less than a minute.
NEWS
April 16, 2014
It's tempting to dismiss Attorney General Douglas F. Gansler's proposals to reduce state spending on the basis of his spectacularly bad idea of eliminating the state prosecutor's office. Getting rid of the one semi-independent actor in Maryland's political establishment with the power to investigate public corruption is exactly the wrong thing to do. However, the rest of the Democratic gubernatorial candidate's plan includes a number of thoughtful observations about Maryland's $38 billion budget and some sensible approaches to making it more efficient.
NEWS
By Del Quentin Wilber and Del Quentin Wilber,SUN STAFF | January 28, 2000
A Howard County Circuit judge has scheduled another hearing in late March on whether state prosecutors used Linda R. Tripp's federally immunized testimony in their investigation against the Columbia resident. Judge Diane O. Leasure set a March 29 hearing date yesterday for attorneys on both sides to argue more motions about Tripp's immunity protection and its role in the state investigation. Leasure also told state prosecutors to submit written briefs by Feb. 25 and defense lawyers to submit filings by March 13. Leasure picked the date to give attorneys more time to work on the complex legal issues and accommodate her court schedule, Tripp's lawyers said.
NEWS
By Del Quentin Wilber and Del Quentin Wilber,SUN STAFF | May 23, 2000
In a decision that could force state prosecutors to drop the wire-tapping case against Linda R. Tripp for lack of evidence, a Howard County circuit judge denied yesterday their attempt to have Monica Lewinsky identify a conversation taped by the Columbia resident. Strongly reaffirming an earlier decision that state prosecutors had sought to clarify, Judge Diane O. Leasure again ruled that Lewinsky cannot testify about crucial issues at Tripp's trial. Though prosecutors declined to discuss whether they will drop the case, Assistant State Prosecutor Thomas M. McDonough said: "Something will be decided in short order.
NEWS
By Del Quentin Wilber and Del Quentin Wilber,SUN STAFF | December 7, 1999
State prosecutors have subpoenaed local friends of Linda R. Tripp, a Newsweek editor, two Radio Shack employees and their own law clerk to testify next week in hearings that will determine whether they can use critical evidence in their wiretapping case against the Columbia resident.Tripp was indicted in July on two counts of violating Maryland's wiretapping law when she tape-recorded a Dec. 22, 1997, conversation with White House intern Monica Lewinsky. The tapes led to independent counsel Kenneth W. Starr's investigation of Lewinsky's affair with President Clinton.
NEWS
By Del Quentin Wilber and Del Quentin Wilber,SUN STAFF | December 7, 1999
State prosecutors have subpoenaed local friends of Linda R. Tripp, a Newsweek editor, two Radio Shack employees and their own law clerk to testify next week in hearings that will determine whether they can use critical evidence in their wiretapping case against the Columbia resident.Tripp was indicted in July on two counts of violating Maryland's wiretapping law when she tape-recorded a Dec. 22, 1997, conversation with White House intern Monica Lewinsky. The tapes led to independent counsel Kenneth W. Starr's investigation of Lewinsky's affair with President Clinton.
NEWS
By DEL QUENTIN WILBER and DEL QUENTIN WILBER,SUN STAFF | May 5, 2000
After filing hundreds of pages of legal briefs and arguing at several hearings, lawyers on both sides of the state wiretapping case against Linda R. Tripp say they are eagerly awaiting a key ruling today that could decide the prosecution's fate. Yet, neither side is handicapping whether Howard County Circuit Judge Diane O. Leasure will grant a defense request to throw out the criminal charges. "We made our arguments and the judge is going to rule," said Assistant State Prosecutor Thomas M. McDonough.
NEWS
By Del Quentin Wilber and Del Quentin Wilber,SUN STAFF | March 21, 2000
Lawyers for Linda R. Tripp attacked the credibility of former White House intern Monica Lewinsky yesterday as they asked a Howard County Circuit Court judge to throw out the illicit-wiretapping case against their client. Tripp's lawyers argued in a 36-page memo yesterday that state prosecutors improperly gathered evidence that was protected by Tripp's immunity agreement with federal authorities investigating President Clinton. They also said the state's key witness, Lewinsky, was "bathed in impermissible taint" and was out to get their client.
NEWS
By Erin Cox and Ian Duncan, The Baltimore Sun | April 15, 2014
Maryland Attorney General Douglas F. Gansler is proposing to eliminate the state prosecutor's office, the independent agency that secured a string of high-profile political convictions in recent years. Gansler, a Democrat running for governor, called the office "a holdover from the Watergate era" that overlaps with other law enforcement offices and said scrapping it would save taxpayers as much as $1.2 million a year. But others called the proposal cause for concern, saying the agency's independence puts it in a unique position to prosecute government or electoral wrong-doing.
NEWS
April 29, 2013
Marilyn J. Mosby, a former Baltimore assistant state's attorney and the wife of City Councilman Nick Mosby, told The Sun that she plans to run for Baltimore state's attorney next year. Mosby's confirmation of her intention to run in 2014 came as she alleged that the city prosecutors' office is partly to blame for the alleged corruption scandal unfolding at the city jail involving the Black Guerilla Family gang. Federal prosecutors said last week that an inmate named Tavon White awaiting charges for attempted murder, who has been in the jail since 2009, turned the facility into his own fiefdom, impregnating corrections officers and running a lucrative drug organization.
NEWS
By Alison Knezevich, The Baltimore Sun | December 21, 2012
A prominent Catonsville developer accused of channeling $7,500 in illegal contributions to a Baltimore County councilman and exceeding the total campaign contribution limit for individuals was charged Thursday with violating campaign contribution laws. The criminal charges against Stephen W. Whalen Jr., 62, of Whalen Properties stem from contributions made to Catonsville-area Councilman Tom Quirk, County Executive Kevin Kamenetz and Towson-area Councilman David Marks. Whalen has reached a plea agreement with prosecutors, according to his lawyer, who declined to offer details.
NEWS
By Erin Cox and Andrea F. Siegel, The Baltimore Sun | October 18, 2012
Anne Arundel County police have taken the badge of a former district commander who is now a target in the state prosecutor's investigation, Chief Larry W. Tolliver said Thursday. Capt. Eric Hodge received a "target letter" this week from the same prosecutors who are pursuing the criminal misconduct case against County Executive John R. Leopold. Tolliver confirmed the letter and said he suspended Hodge's police powers that day after meeting with State Prosecutor Emmet C. Davitt and promising the department's cooperation.
NEWS
By Erin Cox, The Baltimore Sun | September 19, 2012
When he evaluated his retirement options five years ago, Assistant State's Attorney Fred Paone settled on a deal to collect his pension while working as a part-time prosecutor. Now, Anne Arundel County has sent Paone a $115,672.50 bill demanding that he repay retirement benefits and a notice that his future pension checks will be cut as long as he works for the county. An internal audit had revealed that Paone, 61, and three other workers at the Anne Arundel state's attorney's office were illegally collecting full pension payments while working part time.
NEWS
By Alison Knezevich, The Baltimore Sun | August 20, 2012
A Baltimore County administrative law judge turned down Monday a request from a community association to postpone a hearing on a proposed medical office building in Catonsville that has drawn scrutiny from state investigators. Last week, the Office of the State Prosecutor subpoenaed eight county agencies for information about the Southwest Physicians Pavilion, a proposed project by Whalen Properties on a 2.5-acre site next to the Baltimore Beltway. The prosecutor's office has not commented on the reason for the subpoenas.
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | August 27, 1999
Monica Lewinsky has confirmed the authenticity of tape recordings of two conversations secretly recorded by Linda R. Tripp, state prosecutors said in court documents filed yesterday.The Columbia resident was indicted by a Howard County grand jury last month on charges that she illegally taped Lewinsky on Dec. 22, 1997, and then had her attorney illegally disclose the contents to Newsweek magazine.The significance of Lewinsky's confirmation remains unclear because she listened to copies of tapes of conversations that took place in October 1997.
NEWS
By Thomas W. Waldron and Thomas W. Waldron,SUN STAFF | September 28, 1996
Gov. Parris N. Glendening announced yesterday that he will seek a change in state law to allow prosecutors to bring death-penalty cases against accomplices in the murder of police officers -- even if they didn't actually commit the killing.Speaking at an Inner Harbor gun-control rally, Glendening said closing the "loophole" would send a message to drug dealers."Criminals selling drugs on our streets need to know that even if they don't pull the trigger, they can be tried for murder and be sentenced to death," he said.
NEWS
By Alison Knezevich and Arthur Hirsch, The Baltimore Sun | August 16, 2012
The Office of the State Prosecutor subpoenaed eight Baltimore County agencies this week for records on a planned Catonsville medical office development, county officials confirmed Thursday. The subpoenas sought "information and correspondence" regarding the Southwest Physicians Pavilion planned by Whalen Properties, a Catonsville-based developer, county spokeswoman Ellen Kobler said. The county declined to release the subpoenas, and Kobler said officials "would not begin to speculate" on why the state was seeking the information.
NEWS
By Luke Broadwater, The Baltimore Sun | May 1, 2012
Prosecutors want the jury deciding the fate of political consultant Julius Henson to focus on one piece of evidence: the robocall he orchestrated on Election Day 2010 that told Democrats in Baltimore and Prince George's County to "relax" and stay home. That call — which prosecutors say Republican former Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr.'s campaign used in an attempt to suppress black votes — is the "primary evidence in the case," said Maryland State Prosecutor Emmet C. Davitt during opening statements Tuesday.
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