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By Michael Dresser and David Nitkin and Michael Dresser and David Nitkin,SUN STAFF | May 1, 2003
With Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr. reluctantly leading the way, the Board of Public Works raised the state property tax rate yesterday -- an increase he said he would seek to cancel next year. The three-member board, carrying out its obligation under the Maryland Constitution to pay the state's debts, pushed the rate 4.8 cents higher to 13.2 cents per $100 of assessed value. The Republican governor, who hinted last month that he would try to find a way out of voting for the increase, joined Democratic Comptroller William Donald Schaefer and Treasurer Nancy K. Kopp in supporting the $165 million move.
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NEWS
February 21, 2012
It is obvious that Gov.Martin O'Malleyneither drives a car nor has a boat. He also must not pay tolls, property tax or electric bills, buy food or purchase tags for automobiles, or pay in-state college tuition for non-illegal aliens. If he had to do these things, he would better understand why the folks in his state are frustrated. You cannot keep charging the few who have jobs and taking everything they have to finance programs that are wasteful, stupid and just lack common sense. I am not one of the cowards that his wife spoke about, but I feel too much time and money was spent on the gay marriage issue along with the electric company giveaway that everyone knew he would approve.
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FEATURES
By Ann Egerton | December 11, 1993
Finding fresh greens can be a challenge. Most of us don't have many evergreen trees and shrubs in our gardens nor many plants with berries.According to Kathy Bender at Roland Park Florist, florists and professional flower-arrangers get their Christmas stock from wholesalers, who in turn get most of theirs from Newfoundland and New Brunswick in Canada, or from Oregon, Washington state and North Carolina's Smokies.Although there are many varieties of evergreens in Maryland, our climate isn't considered cold enough nor our elevation high enough to encourage growth of most lush evergreens for commercial volume.
NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler and Timothy B. Wheeler,Sun reporter | March 14, 2008
The Senate gave preliminary approval to a bill that would repeal a controversial new law requiring Maryland homeowners to apply for a property tax credit they have been getting automatically until now. But the ultimate prospects for the repeal measure, which comes up for a final vote next week, are murky. The head of the House committee considering a similar bill says she sees no reason to retreat on a Homestead Tax Credit reform intended to weed out scofflaws. The Senate voted 41 to 4 to repeal the application requirement, which sailed through the General Assembly unanimously last year.
NEWS
December 5, 2004
The Sun shows bias against Ehrlich I was shocked and confused when I looked at The Sun's front-page map suggesting that all of our state-owned preservation land was up for sale ("The Lay of the Land," Nov. 18). When the story suggested that Freedom Park's 137 acres could be ripe for development by homebuilders, I knew something was wrong. Your three-page spread was a beautifully photographed attack on our governor that was short on objective reporting and long on artwork and innuendo.
BUSINESS
By James Gallo | March 14, 2004
Rising home values have diminished a state property tax credit for some low-income homeowners, and state lawmakers are considering a plan to change that. Del. John R. Leopold, a Pasadena Republican, has proposed changing the way the state computes property tax credits for homeowners who meet certain income requirements. The current state program offers to income-eligible households a tax break on up to $150,000 of their home's value. But that credit has been wiped out in many cases by the recent rise in home values, Leopold says.
NEWS
September 21, 2007
As appealing as a reduction in property taxes may sound, Gov. Martin O'Malley's proposal to shave 3 cents off the state property tax rate over the next three years isn't smart policy. And yet there he was yesterday in Howard County touting the tax cut as a boost for seniors and others living on a fixed income. That may be true - to a modest degree - but what the governor's $2 billion deficit-reduction proposal giveth, it also taketh away. This is one tax cut he ought not be bragging about.
NEWS
April 19, 2007
Maryland officials filed suit yesterday to require an Eastern Shore race horse breeder to pay millions of dollars in fines and restore a 50-acre wetland that officials say was illegally cleared and filled to create a pasture. Attorney General Douglas F. Gansler and the state Department of the Environment are seeking an order to require restoration of the site and fines of $10,000 a day since Feb. 16 last year, when environmental inspectors first issued a complaint. In papers filed in Caroline County Circuit Court, state officials charged property owner Fred Hertrich with violating the state's Nontidal Wetlands Protection Act and the Water Pollution Control Law. Gregory D. Bee, an excavation contractor, also is named in the suit.
NEWS
By Kerry O'Rourke and Kerry O'Rourke,Sun Staff Writer | August 11, 1994
State Highway Administration employees have found three political campaign signs posted on state property in Carroll County and have removed them or plan to do so soon, Gary W. Bowman, chief of the SHA Outdoor Advertising Section, said yesterday.State law bars political signs in state rights of way or along interstate highways.The signs that violated state law and the candidates they advertised were at:* Routes 140 and 31 in Westminster for Stephen R. Chapin Sr., a Republican candidate for a District 5 delegate seat.
NEWS
February 21, 2012
It is obvious that Gov.Martin O'Malleyneither drives a car nor has a boat. He also must not pay tolls, property tax or electric bills, buy food or purchase tags for automobiles, or pay in-state college tuition for non-illegal aliens. If he had to do these things, he would better understand why the folks in his state are frustrated. You cannot keep charging the few who have jobs and taking everything they have to finance programs that are wasteful, stupid and just lack common sense. I am not one of the cowards that his wife spoke about, but I feel too much time and money was spent on the gay marriage issue along with the electric company giveaway that everyone knew he would approve.
NEWS
September 21, 2007
As appealing as a reduction in property taxes may sound, Gov. Martin O'Malley's proposal to shave 3 cents off the state property tax rate over the next three years isn't smart policy. And yet there he was yesterday in Howard County touting the tax cut as a boost for seniors and others living on a fixed income. That may be true - to a modest degree - but what the governor's $2 billion deficit-reduction proposal giveth, it also taketh away. This is one tax cut he ought not be bragging about.
NEWS
April 19, 2007
Maryland officials filed suit yesterday to require an Eastern Shore race horse breeder to pay millions of dollars in fines and restore a 50-acre wetland that officials say was illegally cleared and filled to create a pasture. Attorney General Douglas F. Gansler and the state Department of the Environment are seeking an order to require restoration of the site and fines of $10,000 a day since Feb. 16 last year, when environmental inspectors first issued a complaint. In papers filed in Caroline County Circuit Court, state officials charged property owner Fred Hertrich with violating the state's Nontidal Wetlands Protection Act and the Water Pollution Control Law. Gregory D. Bee, an excavation contractor, also is named in the suit.
NEWS
By Andrew A. Green and Andrew A. Green,Sun reporter | April 17, 2007
An advisory commission is recommending that the state's portion of the property tax remain at 11.2 cents per $100 of assessed value, despite warnings from Treasurer Nancy K. Kopp that without a tax increase, Maryland's projected budget deficit will grow worse. The Commission on State Debt, made up of Kopp, Comptroller Peter Franchot, three members of the O'Malley administration and a member of the public, is required annually to recommend a rate for the state property tax.
NEWS
By GREG GARLAND and GREG GARLAND,SUN REPORTER | April 27, 2006
The spouse of a Department of General Services official who oversees the sale of surplus state property was allowed to purchase a used car directly from a Maryland agency at a price below what it likely would have sold for at auction, according to an audit released yesterday. Legislative auditors said the June sale "appears to have violated state ethics law and a prior ethics opinion" and referred the matter to the State Ethics Commission for review. The transaction -- which came to auditors' attention through a tip to a fraud hot line -- prompted General Services Secretary Boyd K. Rutherford to order policy changes in January.
NEWS
By JENNIFER SKALKA and JENNIFER SKALKA,SUN REPORTER | April 20, 2006
At the urging of Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr., the state Board of Public Works approved a property tax cut yesterday that will save Maryland homeowners an average of $40 annually -- undoing part of the tax increase passed in his first year in office. The new rate will be 11.2 cents per $100 of assessed property value, a 2-cent reduction. It goes into effect July 1. Ehrlich raised property taxes by approximately 5 cents per $100 of assessed property in his first year. In advocating for the rate reduction yesterday, Ehrlich said he wants to give taxpayers some relief.
NEWS
By TIM JONES and TIM JONES,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | November 28, 2005
SUNSET HILLS, Mo. -- The goodbyes are posted in front yards up and down Floralea Place, declaring in bright orange-and-white lettering, "We're ready to go." But except for a few people like Christopher McGee - who, regrettably, moved out and is paying four mortgages on two homes - no one is going anywhere because the plan to bulldoze about 250 homes in this tattered neighborhood and build a shopping mall has fallen apart. "It's an ugly situation," McGee said. The bitter aftermath of a deal gone sour in this St. Louis suburb has added to the rapidly growing national backlash against the decades-old, local government practice of eminent domain - condemning homes to make way for new development.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser and David Nitkin and Michael Dresser and David Nitkin,SUN STAFF | May 1, 2003
With Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr. reluctantly leading the way, the Board of Public Works raised the state property tax rate yesterday - an increase he said he would seek to cancel next year. The three-member board, carrying out its obligation under the Maryland Constitution to pay the state's debts, pushed the rate 4.8 cents higher to 13.2 cents per $100 of assessed value. The Republican governor, who hinted last month that he would try to find a way out of voting for the increase, joined Democratic Comptroller William Donald Schaefer and Treasurer Nancy K. Kopp in supporting the $165 million move.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,SUN STAFF | April 22, 1997
Carroll County and the town of Sykesville have been competing for a 131-acre site at Springfield Hospital Center since the state announced plans to sell or lease the property 18 months ago.Now that the deadline for proposals has passed, the two local governments have emerged as the only bidders for the Warfield Complex: 14 historic, but neglected, buildings on what could be prime industrial land along Route 32 in southern Carroll County.State planner Linda Janey said the property was offered to all other state agencies.
NEWS
By David Nitkin and David Nitkin,SUN STAFF | April 5, 2005
Maryland Senate leaders are refusing to accept a House of Delegates plan for a statewide property tax cut, leading some lawmakers to question whether a budget stalemate has been artificially created so that slot machine revenue can emerge as the solution. Budget negotiators met for just a few minutes yesterday morning, and it quickly became clear that senators would not approve the House tax-cut initiative. With talks aborted, the Assembly missed a midnight deadline for passing a $26 billion spending plan for the fiscal year beginning July 1. Under the state constitution, Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr. must now issue a proclamation extending the Assembly session beyond its scheduled April 11 adjournment, but a resolution is expected before then.
NEWS
By David Nitkin and David Nitkin,SUN STAFF | February 3, 2005
Democratic leaders in the House of Delegates want to roll back the state portion of property tax bills to save families an average of $90 a year. Maryland's improving financial picture means the state has enough money to reverse a tax increase first proposed by Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr. two years ago as part of a budget-balancing package, lawmakers said yesterday. "Property taxes are among the most unfair taxes anybody can pay," said Del. Kumar P. Barve, the House majority leader from Montgomery County.
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