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NEWS
May 2, 2006
A Maryland program that promotes the marriage of historic preservation and tourism has been awarded a national preservation award. Maryland Heritage Areas was one of four winners of the Preserve America Presidential Awards, announced yesterday during a White House ceremony. The state program began in 1996 and has designated 13 heritage areas, stretching from Garrett County to the Lower Eastern Shore. The heritage areas are eligible to receive state grants and tax incentives for rehabilitation initiatives.
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NEWS
By Mark Newgent | January 28, 2014
The revelations of the secret audit of Xerox State and Local Solutions' operation of Baltimore's speed camera system showing the company had error rates 40 times higher than what city officials were telling the public, should prompt a review of speed cameras in other jurisdictions, including the state.  In June 2010, the same company, then known as ACS State and Local Solutions, won the contract to operate the pilot program for the Maryland SafeZones Program.  Xerox acquired ACS that same year.
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NEWS
By Jamie Stiehm and Jamie Stiehm,SUN STAFF | February 10, 2003
A handful of Baltimore homeowners and community organizers are planning to go to Annapolis this week to defend the state's historic tax credit program, saying it has been successful in revitalizing the city's old housing stock. The state program, enacted in 1997, refunds to homeowners 20 percent of the cost of rehabilitating houses considered of historic value. Critics say the $25 million to $30 million program -- about half of the funds go to city residents -- is something the state cannot afford in the current budget crisis.
HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker | October 23, 2013
The state Medicaid program is expanding the types of doctors and other medical providers it will reimburse for providing consultation to patients remotely. In the past, Medicaid only reimbursed such telemedicine services for mental health consultation. Now the program will pay for other specialists as well. The patient must be in the office with their physician when the consultation is given. The program is meant to provide better care in areas, such as rural parts of the states, where there is a shortage of specialists.
NEWS
By Howard Libit and Howard Libit,SUN STAFF | November 22, 2003
Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr. moved forward yesterday on his campaign promise to encourage cleanup and redevelopment of polluted industrial sites by unveiling changes to simplify the process for developers who want to join the state program. The governor also pledged the administration will try to push a more controversial measure through the General Assembly this winter that would limit developers' liability for the polluted sites known as brownfields. "What we have been doing in this state for the past decade has not worked as well as it should work," Ehrlich said during a news conference at the Maryland Department of the Environment headquarters in Baltimore.
BUSINESS
By M. William Salganik and M. William Salganik,SUN STAFF | June 20, 2001
Taking a second pass at providing prescription drug coverage for seniors, state legislative leaders and CareFirst BlueCross BlueShield kicked off signups yesterday for a new program with wider eligibility and lower premiums. The state and CareFirst also launched a program last year, but - with premiums at $40 a month and eligibility limited to 17 rural counties - only about 1,600 seniors signed up. The original program "was not very successful, and the reason was money," said Thomas L. Bromwell, chairman of the Senate Finance Committee.
NEWS
By Adam Sachs and Adam Sachs,Staff writer | December 26, 1990
The county won't have a non-tidal wetlands program to assist developers by Tuesday, the date a new state law imposes tighter restrictions on construction in the environmentally critical areas.Under the Non-tidal Wetlands Protection Act, Maryland's subdivisions have the right to assume control of the program from the state. A county program ideally would allow more direct and quicker assistance to builders in delineating wetlands, planning mitigation measures, and filling out applications.
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | January 5, 2011
The state has approved tax credits for employers who hired just under 1,500 previously unemployed Marylanders in 2010, a surge in numbers from a few months ago but still far short of the total number of credits available. The H.I.R.E. Maryland effort, a $5,000 refundable tax credit in exchange for each person given a job after a stint on the unemployment rolls, had the budget to support 4,000 hires made between mid-March and Dec. 31. The state Department of Labor, Licensing and Regulation says it's not yet clear what the total number of claims will be because there's no deadline to apply.
NEWS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins and Jamie Smith Hopkins,SUN STAFF | May 29, 2002
For 22 years the state has saved farmland - more than 200,000 acres of it - by paying owners not to develop. Now, some who own farms that were protected in the program's early years have visions of a cash crop of houses. They are eyeing a provision in their contracts with the state that offers the possibility of buying their way out of the preservation deal after 25 years. Such escape attempts would be fraught with bureaucratic and financial hurdles. But the idea is tempting, because land values have skyrocketed.
NEWS
By KAREN NITKIN and KAREN NITKIN,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | August 20, 2006
David Himelstein has been going blind since he was 18. Now he's 49 and can see nothing but what he described as a "white cloud." Bright light hurts his eyes, so for the past five years, he said, "I was stuck in a house in a dark room." Last week, though, he was in a kitchen at Anne Arundel Community College, adding cloves and cinnamon to a marinade for baby back ribs and flank steak. Himelstein, of Baltimore, was one of five participants in a training program called the Maryland Business Enterprise Program for the Blind, run by the state's Division of Rehabilitation Services.
EXPLORE
August 12, 2013
Chas Slimowicz, chair of the Boys State Program for American Legion Harford Post 39 and Harford County of the Department of Maryland, announced the participation and graduation of Kevin Porter and Matthew Martindale from Bel Air High School, Manuel N. Mastromanolis and Farhad M. Siddique from C. Milton Wright High School, Tahir C. Senoussi from Harford Technical High School, Ryan White from Havre de Grace High School and Daniel S. Gorski, Stephen F....
HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker | July 1, 2013
 The state is expanding a program that better connects youth to mental health services. The program, which aims to get youth mental health treatment through their primary care doctor's office, started in Western Maryland and the Eastern Shore in January and will now expand statewide. Pediatric doctors have access to mental health professionals for consultation and guidance under the program. Doctors can reach mental health doctors through phone consultation or they can tap a database with a list of providers where primary care doctors can refer patients.
NEWS
By Dan Naor | February 18, 2013
In October, Waterfront Partnership's Healthy Harbor Initiative released the State of Baltimore's Harbor Report, an assessment of the current health of Baltimore's Inner Harbor and its surrounding tributaries. According to the study, the water quality received an overall poor score. Anyone walking near the Inner Harbor can see from the bulkhead that the water is littered with trash, debris and pollutants, unfortunately making it unsafe for swimming and fishing. An unsettling contributor to this problem is the fact that of Maryland's 600 marinas, only 25 percent are currently designated as a Maryland Clean Marina by the Department of Natural Resources.
NEWS
By Walter Olson | December 27, 2012
In a widely watched case on the Eastern Shore, federal judge William Nickerson ruled Thursday that Alan and Kristin Hudson's Berlin farm was not in violation of the federal Clean Water Act. The plaintiffs, the Waterkeeper Alliance led by controversial environmentalist Robert F. Kennedy Jr., had hoped to establish that big food processors, in this case Perdue Inc., could be held liable for the alleged pollution sins of "contract growers" like the Hudson...
NEWS
By Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | October 20, 2012
The two men wore body armor with "POLICE" written across the chest and spilled out of their unmarked car, weapons drawn, ordering Christopher Dukes and his passenger out of their vehicle at a South Baltimore gas station parking lot. When Dukes pulled off, they embarked on a high-speed chase down Interstate 295 until catching up and placing the pair under arrest, charging documents show. Then it was time for the real police to take over. The men in the body armor were not Baltimore police officers or federal agents, but instead a little-known classification of security guards known as "special police," who are commissioned by the city or state to arrest and detain citizens - but only on specific properties.
NEWS
October 5, 2012
Your article about students' difficulties taking the state high school equivalency exam left readers with several misperceptions ("GED test takers face obstacles," Oct. 2). Last year, the Department of Labor, Licensing and Regulation increased the number of GED tests offered each month by 12 percent, which is nearly 12,000 tests each year. We have reduced the testing wait time from three months to one. We also added six new testing centers, including three in Baltimore City. In addition, we are investing in new staff for the GED office in order to serve Marylanders even more effectively.
NEWS
By Childs Walker and Childs Walker,SUN STAFF | August 30, 2001
Paul W. Scheidt, longtime director of Maryland's nationally lauded agricultural land preservation program, died Tuesday of injuries suffered in a car accident that night. The Denton resident was 40. Scheidt was traveling south on American Corner Road in Caroline County about 9 p.m. when his Dodge Ram pickup crossed the center line and went off the northbound shoulder, Maryland State Police said. The pickup hit a ditch and a utility pole, then flipped, throwing Scheidt from the vehicle.
NEWS
By Maria Blackburn and Maria Blackburn,SUN STAFF | December 30, 2001
Westminster city officials have decided to take a few road trips to research how the city might create its arts and entertainment district. "We want to travel to some similarly-sized cities that have an arts district and see how it's done," said Damian L. Halstad, Common Council president. Earlier visits to Providence, R.I. - which has a successful arts district - though informative, weren't relevant, considering that that city's population is about 10 times the size of Westminster's.
SPORTS
By Steven Petrella and The Baltimore Sun | July 23, 2012
NCAA president Mark Emmert brought down the proverbial hammer on Penn State Monday morning, imposing severe sanctions that will likely cripple the program for at least a decade. The school received a four-year bowl ban, 10 less scholarships per year until 2014-15, a $60 million fine, and all wins from 1998-2011 will be vacated in the wake of the Jerry Sandusky child-abuse scandal.  The program will not cease operation or receive the so-called 'death penalty,' which many in the national media called for. Some experts have said the sanctions imposed are actually worse than the suspension of a season.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick and The Baltimore Sun | April 11, 2012
Is your Maryland crab cake true blue? Only a small number of restaurants in Maryland reliably make their crab cakes from local crabmeat, and the state does not require restaurants to identify the specific source of the meat in crab cakes. True Blue, a new  labeling and promotion initiative from The Maryland Department of Natural Resources (DNR), hopes to give restaurants that do use Maryland crabmeat a claw up on those that fill their crab cakes with inexpensive imported meat from Indonesia and Venezuela.
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