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NEWS
Erin Cox and The Baltimore Sun | October 2, 2013
With the federal shutdown, Maryland can only pay to feed low-income women and children for a "limited period of time," the state's budget secretary said Wednesday. The state can cover the cost of food stamps and energy programs until the end of October, the secretary said. But she is still talking with the White House and its budget office on how to pay for the federal Women, Infant and Children nutrition program that helps feed about 150,000 people in Maryland each year. "That is one program that the government has said they're not going to provide funding for," Department of Budget and Management Sec. T. Eloise Foster said at a Board of Public Works meeting.
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NEWS
By Kevin Rector and The Baltimore Sun | October 2, 2014
More than two dozen West Baltimore homeowners are suing the state of Maryland to block the planned Red Line transit project from tunneling beneath their block, contending that they were inappropriately left out of the planning process. They seek more than $22 million in damages for lost property value and emotional distress. "Right now, they've lost so much of the value of their homes," said Lewyn Scott Garrett, one of three attorneys representing the 25 homeowners in the 300 block of N. Fremont Ave. in the city's Poppleton neighborhood.
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NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | March 27, 2011
Maryland officials say they've detected little or no trace of radiation in the state from the Japanese nuclear reactor accident, though federal agencies are reporting slightly elevated levels of radioactive iodine in rainwater in Pennsylvania and Massachusetts. Dr. Joshua M. Sharfstein, Maryland secretary of health and mental hygiene, said that monitoring by state agencies of air, water and food supplies has found "no reason for public health concern. " The Environmental Protection Agency and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention announced Sunday that "very small amounts" of radioactive materials might be detected in air and precipitation across the country using very sensitive equipment.
ENTERTAINMENT
Timothy B. Wheeler and The Baltimore Sun | September 28, 2014
The decades-long decline in lead-poisoned children in Maryland has essentially stalled, but state officials said Thursday they are taking steps in the coming months to address gaps in the marathon effort to eliminate the environmental health threat. Statewide, 2,622 youngsters up to age 6 were found to have harmful levels of lead in their blood last year, according to an annual report just released by the Maryland Department of the Environment. That's down 4 percent from 2012, though the number of children with seriously elevated lead levels grew slightly, from 364 to 371. Exposure to even minute amounts of lead can harm still-developing brains and nervous systems of young children, leading to learning and behavioral problems.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel, The Baltimore Sun | October 18, 2010
Anne Arundel County police and state officials are investigating how two county officers checking on an elderly woman assumed she was dead when, in fact, she was not. "The initial facts in this case are deeply disturbing. I take this matter extremely serious and have ordered a thorough investigation of this incident," Anne Arundel County Police Chief James Teare Sr. said in a statement. Earlier this month, a Severna Park woman had called 911 because she hadn't seen her neighbor, Ruth Shillinglaw Johnson, 89, in five days.
NEWS
By Lynn Anderson and Lynn Anderson,SUN STAFF | January 26, 2005
State officials lifted all restrictions on flu shots yesterday, saying there is enough vaccine on hand to offer influenza vaccinations to everyone - not just people at high risk from the illness. Maryland joins at least 17 other states that have done the same after the federal government eased restrictions last month, according to the Association of State and Territorial Health Officials. A national shortage of flu vaccine prompted Maryland officials to limit those eligible to receive it. The shortage occurred when 48 million doses of adult vaccine - roughly half the expected U.S. supply - were pulled from the market after bacterial contamination was found in a British production facility.
NEWS
By Ivan Penn and Ivan Penn,SUN STAFF | February 10, 2005
Pointing to statistics on motor vehicle accidents and studies of a lack of maturity among teenagers, state officials urged a House of Delegates committee yesterday to support legislation to increase restrictions on young drivers, one of Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr.'s top priorities. Maryland transportation officials told the House Environmental Matters Committee that statistics from 2003, the state's latest, show that 146 of the 651 vehicle fatalities that year, 22 percent of the total, involved drivers ages 16 to 20. And nearly half of the young drivers involved in the fatal crashes were not wearing seat belts.
NEWS
By William Thompson and William Thompson,Evening Sun Staff | December 3, 1990
Comptroller Louis L. Goldstein is suggesting that he and other top state office-holders sacrifice part of their forthcoming pay raises because of Maryland's budget crisis and to demonstrate sensitivity to the 75,000 rank-and-file state workers whose cost-of-living raises seem to be in jeopardy.Goldstein, citing an alarming slump in state sales tax revenue, said at a Board of Public Works meeting last week that ranking office-holders ought to get smaller pay raises."I'm going to propose that state officials take a discount," the comptroller said.
NEWS
By Marina Sarris and Marina Sarris,Sun Staff Writer | May 10, 1995
Every morning a state trooper arrives at Oakland Hall, the Calvert County home of Louis L. Goldstein, to whisk the state comptroller 40 miles to work. For the next 12 hours, the trooper will not stray far from him.Mr. Goldstein is among an elite group of Maryland politicians who together receive nearly $2 million a year worth of protection and transportation from the state police.More than 30 troopers guard the governor and six other state officials, including the lieutenant governor, attorney general, treasurer, Senate president and House speaker.
NEWS
By M. Dion Thompson | August 17, 1991
State officials sifting through the morass of records at the Baltimore City Detention Center are trying to determine the circumstances surrounding the incarceration of two men who have been in jail for over a year.What officials do know is that the men have been in jail longer than Martin R. Henn, the 54-year-old homeless man whose 13-month incarceration without trial focused attention on recordkeeping at the jail.Leonard A. Sipes Jr., a jail spokesman, said it will take state officials several days to resolve the questions about the two men. One investigator spent two days resolving Mr. Henn's case, he said.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser and The Baltimore Sun | September 17, 2014
Maryland officials said Wednesday that most of the more than 2,800 immigrant children who have come to the state from Central America this year have been resettled with family members. Fewer than 50 are housed in a group setting at any one time, said Human Resources Secretary Ted Dallas, and only for less than a month while awaiting placement in a private home. He said the facility is in Baltimore County but declined to say where. Dallas said the children have shown themselves to be resilient in the face of the problems of their homelands and the arduous journeys that brought them to the nation's southern border.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | August 22, 2014
When a high-ranking O'Malley administration official was fired after allegedly steering about $774,000 in federal grant money to a company to which the official had close ties, no announcement was made. Only this week was the dismissal two years ago made public by legislative auditors. Auditors revealed that an inspector general had completed a report in 2013 that found misuse of government funds and a "serious conflict of interest" on the part of the top official of the Department of Labor, Licensing and Regulation's Division of Workforce Development.
FEATURES
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | August 12, 2014
DiJohn Thomas grew up bouncing between foster placements in Baltimore, never knowing how his peers, the next foster parents or staff at his next group home would respond to his being gay. Sometimes the adults responded negatively, he said, and his peers with their fists. "I've never been homeless to the point where I had to sleep outside, but there were times when I would leave group homes and wouldn't have anywhere to go but to a friend's house, sleeping on a couch," said Thomas, who is now 21 and first entered the foster system at age 6. "Most of the time, I would fight or people wouldn't like me just because they knew I was gay. " Advocates for the lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender community say Thomas's experiences are all too common.
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn | August 11, 2014
State health officials are reminding parents to get their kids their vaccinations before school starts. Some of the requirements are new, and students can be kept out of the classroom if they do not have the proper shots. “We have spent the past year helping parents and schools prepare for these school immunization requirements,” said Dr. Laura Herrera, deputy secretary for the Department of Health and Mental Hygiene's Public Health Services. “We want to be sure all Maryland children start the school year with up-to-date vaccinations and are ready to learn.” Students entering kindergarten now must have had two chickenpox (varicella)
NEWS
Erin Cox and The Baltimore Sun | August 8, 2014
Residents inundated by June floods in Western Maryland can apply for $5,000 in state cash, Gov. Martin O'Malley announced Friday. The program will give grants to help cover medical, housing, and food expenses caused by June 12 flash floods that officials said destroyed about 200 homes in Allegany and Washington counties.  O'Malley promised the state would help ease the burden of distressed residents when he visited the area on Wednesday....
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn and Pamela Wood, The Baltimore Sun | July 15, 2014
Coding problems that led to coverage and billing troubles for thousands of consumers using Connecticut's online insurance marketplace will be fixed in Maryland's version of the technology, officials said today. Maryland officials had been preparing to use the technology underlying the Connecticut exchange after ditching their own glitch-prone software. They still expect the new Maryland Health Benefit Exchange website to be operating smoothly in November, when the next round of consumers will be allowed to buy health coverage.
NEWS
By Jill Rosen and Jill Rosen,SUN STAFF | October 26, 2004
A planned renovation of Baltimore's main probation and parole office is facing a legal challenge by a coalition of community groups and people who live nearby who want to stop the $15 million project and ultimately have the facility moved. Nine community groups and seven residents filed an injunction against the state yesterday in Circuit Court to halt the renovation of the office at 2100 Guilford Ave. The lawsuit also seeks $5 million in damages. "We really don't want the state to renovate the facility - it's totally inappropriate where it's located," said Jennifer Martin, a plaintiff who lives three blocks from the probation office.
NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler and Timothy B. Wheeler,Sun reporter | January 16, 2008
Police and state transportation officials urged lawmakers yesterday to expand the use of speed cameras in Maryland, saying they want to save lives, not raise revenues. Baltimore City and Howard County are among the local governments seeking to join Montgomery County with state legislation authorizing deployment of cameras to catch speeders. Local and state officials told members of the House Environmental Matters Committee that the devices have proven effective in reducing speeding and accidents and that they are more economical than posting a policeman on the roadside.
NEWS
July 15, 2014
The death of a severely disabled foster child earlier this month while under the care of a group home in Anne Arundel County that Maryland health regulators were in the process of shutting down inevitably raises the question of whether the boy's life could have been saved if state officials had acted more quickly. The state has launched three separate investigations into 10-year-old Damaud Martin's death, but the results may not be known for months. Regardless of whether anything could have changed Damaud's fate, though, the investigative reporting by The Sun's Doug Donovan into the troubled history of LifeLine raises real questions about whether the state's oversight of such care providers is adequate to protect some of the state's most vulnerable young people.
NEWS
By Jeff Barker and Erin Cox, The Baltimore Sun | July 11, 2014
Two Maryland lawmakers said Friday they will ask a state Senate committee to explore the death of a 10-year-old disabled foster child who was in the care of a group home. Another state senator who advocates for people with disabilities said the boy's death at the Laurel-area group home pointed to a shortage of funding and resources to serve vulnerable people in Maryland. The Baltimore Sun reported Thursday that the boy died as the state was in the process of shutting down the home amid concern about staffing problems at the center.
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