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NEWS
October 1, 1991
Evening Sun reporter Sue Miller has won first place in the annual Media Awards Program for Excellence in Medical Journalism sponsored by state medical society.Miller, the newspaper's medical writer, won the daily newspaper category for an in-depth Page 1 story, "AIDS: 10 years later." The story, which ran June 5, 1991, both looked back at the growing epidemic of acquired immune deficiency syndrome cases and ahead to what America and Maryland face in the future regarding the devastating disease.
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HEALTH
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | April 1, 2013
A bill to give health regulators more oversight of facilities like the now-closed Monarch Medspa in Timonium is making a late surge in the General Assembly after weeks of discussions among state and industry officials. The House of Delegates unanimously passed the legislation Monday afternoon. It needs to clear the Senate, including an extra procedural step, within the next week. The legislative session draws to a close April 8. If passed, the law would close a regulatory gap that does not allow state health officials to proactively inspect and oversee plastic surgery centers.
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NEWS
By Thomas W. Waldron and Thomas W. Waldron,Evening Sun Staff | August 9, 1991
The state medical society has gone on the offensive against Gov. William Donald Schaefer's tentative call for mandatory testing of health-care providers and patients.The Medical and Chirurgical Faculty of Maryland -- the state medical society -- issued a statement yesterday reaffirming its .. long-time position against testing, calling it scientifically unnecessary and impractical."Any attempt to pass legislation mandating HIV testing for health-care workers and patients would not be based on scientific data surrounding the AIDS epidemic but would rather be a reaction to unfounded public fear," Dr. Fred A. Gill, chairman of the society's AIDS committee, said in a statement.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,sun reporter | September 22, 2006
Dr. J. David Nagel, a retired internist who was a leader in the state's medical profession, died Tuesday of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, Lou Gehrig's disease, at his Butler home. He was 66. President of the state medical society from 1991 to 1992, Dr. Nagel made numerous appearances before the Maryland General Assembly to discuss issues affecting medicine. Born Jacob David Nagel in Baltimore, he was the son of Dr. Henry Nagel, physician at what was then the Levindale Hebrew Home and Infirmary.
NEWS
By Jonathan Bor | August 9, 1991
Wasting little time, the state medical society yesterday denounced Gov. William Donald Schaefer's call for the mandatory testing of many health-care workers and patients for the AIDS virus, calling it a pointless move that plays into unfounded public fears.The medical society first went on record two years ago opposing any mandatory testing for acquired immune deficiency syndrome. But Dr. Marvin Schneider, chairman of the group's governing council, said that the society decided to respond to the governor's statements Monday that he hopes to make widespread testing the law of Maryland.
BUSINESS
By M. William Salganik and M. William Salganik,SUN STAFF | June 29, 1999
Doctors and hospitals routinely complain about slower payments from insurers, but complaints have grown more intense on the Eastern Shore, where, the state medical society says, CareFirst BlueCross BlueShield is behind on paying millions of dollars in Medicare claims."
NEWS
By Robert Hilson Jr. and Robert Hilson Jr.,SUN STAFF | September 19, 1998
Dr. Deusdedit L. Jolbitado, a retired psychiatrist at the Spring Grove and Springfield Hospital centers, died Sept. 12 of heart failure at Temple University Hospital in Philadelphia.Dr. Jolbitado, who was 70 and lived in Randallstown, served on the board of governors of the Baltimore County Medical Association and in the House of Delegates of the Medical and Chirurgical Faculty of Maryland, the state medical society.A native of the Philippines, Dr. Jolbitado received his medical training at the University of Santo Tomas in Manila, where he graduated in 1956.
NEWS
By Jonathan Bor and Jonathan Bor,Staff Writer | August 5, 1993
With surveys showing that doctors often miss signs of substance abuse in their patients, the state medical society announced plans yesterday to educate doctors across Maryland in the care of people who abuse alcohol and drugs.Officials with the Medical and Chirurgical Society unveiled plans to take a substance abuse course to hospitals, clinics and other health care centers, where they hope to reach as many of the state's 7,000 primary care doctors as possible."Unfortunately, the medical school education doesn't address this issue in the depth that it should," Dr. Kevin Ferentz, a family practitioner at the University of Maryland Medical Center, said yesterday during a news briefing in Baltimore.
NEWS
By John W. Frece and John W. Frece,Sun Staff Writer | March 31, 1994
Maryland doctors scored an important late-session victory yesterday by pushing from a Senate committee a bill that would require health maintenance organizations to pay part of the cost for patients who seek medical care outside of their HMO network.The heavily lobbied bill is opposed by General Assembly leaders, big business, organized labor and the powerful insurance industry.Representatives of the state medical society, however, said that if the bill is passed in the final 12 days of this legislative session, Marylanders enrolled in HMOs will get what they want: the right to choose their own physician and have their insurer help pay for it.The bill would require HMOs to pay doctors or other medical providers outside their network 75 percent of what the HMO would otherwise pay for the same treatment inside the network.
BUSINESS
By M. William Salganik and M. William Salganik,SUN STAFF | December 14, 1996
Seeking to avoid a legislative battle, the state's health data collectors and the state medical society have agreed to additional privacy protections in the state's database.But some privacy advocates are unhappy over the agreement, saying it helps doctors more than patients and takes the medical society -- with its lobbying power -- out of the coalition pushing for more regulations to guarantee confidentiality.At issue is the information being collected by the Health Care Access and Cost Commission (HCACC)
NEWS
By Dan Thanh Dang and Dan Thanh Dang,SUN STAFF | May 16, 2003
Angry consumer and health advocates accused CareFirst BlueCross BlueShield yesterday of using last-minute scare tactics and threats to block reform, and urged Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr. to demand the resignation of the insurer's top two leaders. The state medical society and four other groups asked Ehrlich to convene a hearing next week in a final attempt to save reform legislation that would replace nearly half of CareFirst's 21- member board. CareFirst Inc. threw reform efforts into jeopardy Tuesday when it warned Ehrlich in a letter that the legislation would prompt an automatic termination of its license to use the Blue Cross trademark and name.
NEWS
March 18, 2003
A YEAR AGO, this page backed state Sen. Paula C. Hollinger's efforts to improve the state board that investigates complaints against Maryland's doctors and disciplines them. The Baltimore County Democrat's bill to wrest control of this oversight from the state medical society got very little traction in last year's legislative session. To her credit, Senator Hollinger isn't giving up, and this year - because the physician board expires in June if there's no renewing legislation - her bill has more of a tailwind.
NEWS
By Jonathan Bor and Jonathan Bor,SUN STAFF | September 5, 2002
A Washington-based advocacy group said yesterday that Maryland has one of the nation's weakest systems of disciplining bad doctors, in part because it gives the state medical society a key role in investigating complaints of wrongdoing. Public Citizen's Health Research Group said the state ranked 43rd last year on license revocations, suspensions and surrenders - compared with a rank of 40 a year earlier. Dr. Sidney Wolfe, executive director of the group, placed blame squarely on the role played by MedChi, the state medical society, calling it a conflict of interest that allows doctors who have made serious medical mistakes to remain in practice and endanger other patients.
NEWS
March 19, 2002
IN MARYLAND, doctors essentially police themselves, with the state medical society playing an unusually big role in investigating complaints and disciplining errant physicians. State Sen. Paula C. Hollinger aptly likens this cozy relationship to "the fox guarding the henhouse." It's an apparent conflict of interest in which patients are the potential losers, and unfortunately it may well continue. Senator Hollinger has been backing legislation to diminish the medical society's role as the watchdog of its own members and to lower the state's high standard of proof for disciplinary actions against physicians.
NEWS
By Greg Garland and Greg Garland,SUN STAFF | March 6, 2002
State regulators say their investigation of a Maryland physician who has been sued 18 times for malpractice uncovered no problems that would warrant taking any disciplinary action against the doctor. The target of the review was Dr. Ghevont W. Wartanian, an obstetrician/gynecologist who practices at Harbor Hospital in Baltimore. He was profiled in an article in The Sun in August that examined weaknesses in Maryland's system for regulating doctors. The article revealed how Wartanian had never faced disciplinary action or restrictions on his practice, despite 18 lawsuits over the past two decades - nine of which led to total combined payments of more than $2 million.
BUSINESS
By M. William Salganik and M. William Salganik,SUN STAFF | June 29, 1999
Doctors and hospitals routinely complain about slower payments from insurers, but complaints have grown more intense on the Eastern Shore, where, the state medical society says, CareFirst BlueCross BlueShield is behind on paying millions of dollars in Medicare claims."
NEWS
March 18, 2003
A YEAR AGO, this page backed state Sen. Paula C. Hollinger's efforts to improve the state board that investigates complaints against Maryland's doctors and disciplines them. The Baltimore County Democrat's bill to wrest control of this oversight from the state medical society got very little traction in last year's legislative session. To her credit, Senator Hollinger isn't giving up, and this year - because the physician board expires in June if there's no renewing legislation - her bill has more of a tailwind.
NEWS
By Jay Apperson and Jay Apperson,Sun Staff Writer | March 29, 1995
The former assistant controller of the state medical society has been charged with embezzling more than a half-million dollars from the organization over a six-year period.Phillip H. Moore, 49, of Lansdowne is charged with stealing $552,816.71 from the Medical and Chirurgical Faculty of Maryland between 1987 and 1993, prosecutors said yesterday. He is to be arraigned April 10 in Baltimore Circuit Court on one count of felony theft.Mr. Moore is accused of taking the money by writing fraudulent checks on organization accounts, said Gary Honick, a prosecutor in the economic crimes unit of the Baltimore state's attorney's office.
NEWS
By Robert Hilson Jr. and Robert Hilson Jr.,SUN STAFF | September 19, 1998
Dr. Deusdedit L. Jolbitado, a retired psychiatrist at the Spring Grove and Springfield Hospital centers, died Sept. 12 of heart failure at Temple University Hospital in Philadelphia.Dr. Jolbitado, who was 70 and lived in Randallstown, served on the board of governors of the Baltimore County Medical Association and in the House of Delegates of the Medical and Chirurgical Faculty of Maryland, the state medical society.A native of the Philippines, Dr. Jolbitado received his medical training at the University of Santo Tomas in Manila, where he graduated in 1956.
BUSINESS
By M. William Salganik and M. William Salganik,SUN STAFF | December 14, 1996
Seeking to avoid a legislative battle, the state's health data collectors and the state medical society have agreed to additional privacy protections in the state's database.But some privacy advocates are unhappy over the agreement, saying it helps doctors more than patients and takes the medical society -- with its lobbying power -- out of the coalition pushing for more regulations to guarantee confidentiality.At issue is the information being collected by the Health Care Access and Cost Commission (HCACC)
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