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By Lorraine Mirabella and Lorraine Mirabella,Sun Staff Writer | May 7, 1995
Realtors in Maryland, Virginia, West Virginia and the District of Columbia are creating what they predict will be the nation's largest, most advanced system of selling and buying homes.Through a new, regional multiple-listing service, real estate agents will have access to homes for sale across county and state lines from Fredericksburg, Va., to the Pennsylvania line.Metropolitan Regional Information Systems Inc. is expected to replace eight local MLS systems with a single source of cutting-edge electronic technology, speeding and simplifying the home-buying process.
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NEWS
January 5, 2013
It is clear from the Second Amendment that the actual purpose of ensuring the availability of firearms is to permit the state to maintain a "well regulated militia" - not a loose rabble of gun owners who might decide to form one when they deem it necessary, and certainly not some private militia with its own agenda that may not be consistent with the will of the people. It seems that any attempt at effective gun control is immediately opposed by those purporting to be willing to volunteer as state militia troops.
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BUSINESS
By David Conn and David Conn,Staff Writer | October 8, 1993
NationsBank Corp. may have found a way to do what the Congress has forbidden: operate one bank across several state lines.The Charlotte, N.C., company, now Maryland's largest banking company, this week applied to federal regulators for the right to do a two-step maneuver that would merge a bank it owns in Washington with one in Maryland. If approved, the company would own a bank headquartered in Maryland that has branches in the District of Columbia, and maybe Virginia at some point.Until now, all bank holding companies that operate in more than one state have had to establish separate "parent" banks in each of those states.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare, The Baltimore Sun | September 14, 2012
Anne Arundel County police and school officials have thwarted a child abduction across state lines. Anonymous information related to a middle-school counselor on Sept. 6 detailed a 12-year-old girl's plans to run away from home with a boyfriend in a stolen vehicle. School personnel, including the resource officer, contacted the student's guardian and received permission to access the child's social media account and cellular phone data. Information discovered in those accounts convinced officials the boyfriend was an adult male, who likely knew the age of the child.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare, The Baltimore Sun | September 14, 2012
Anne Arundel County police and school officials have thwarted a child abduction across state lines. Anonymous information related to a middle-school counselor on Sept. 6 detailed a 12-year-old girl's plans to run away from home with a boyfriend in a stolen vehicle. School personnel, including the resource officer, contacted the student's guardian and received permission to access the child's social media account and cellular phone data. Information discovered in those accounts convinced officials the boyfriend was an adult male, who likely knew the age of the child.
NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | September 20, 1999
WASHINGTON -- After mounting major efforts to foster electronic commerce and connect schools and libraries to the Internet, the federal government is falling short on another ambitious cyberspace goal: using the Net to improve rural medical care.A 2-year-old, $400 million federal program aimed at helping the United States' 22,000 rural medical facilities get high-speed Internet access did not award any money last year because of bureaucratic delays. As of July 6, $289,424 had been distributed to 68 of 452 applicants -- less than one-fifth of the annual $1.4 million cost of administering the program.
NEWS
By Michael James and Michael James,SUN STAFF | February 29, 2000
A 35-year-old Alaskan oil pipeline worker was charged yesterday with traveling to Maryland intending to have sex with a 13-year-old boy, who was an undercover FBI agent on the Internet. Larry Breshears, a welding inspector for the North Slope Alaska oil fields, was arrested at an Annapolis hotel after flying into Baltimore-Washington International Airport to meet "Josh," the undercover name used by the agent, 31-year-old Stacey M. Bradley. Bradley met Breshears in December in an America Online chat room, where she was posing as a child as part of the FBI's Innocent Images program.
NEWS
By NOAM N. LEVEY and NOAM N. LEVEY,LOS ANGELES TIMES | July 26, 2006
WASHINGTON -- Senate Republicans pushed through legislation yesterday making it a federal crime to evade parental consent laws by taking minors across state lines for abortions. The 65-34 Senate vote - which came just a week after a bill on stem cell research divided several leading Republicans from their anti-abortion base - gave the party another plank for its "values" agenda. Building on parental consent requirements in many states, the vote marked another victory in the drive by abortion opponents to limit access to the procedure.
NEWS
December 26, 1996
A 27-year-old fugitive from South Carolina was arrested at the Fort McHenry Tunnel at about 7: 50 p.m. yesterday when his car broke down and helpful officers discovered an outstanding warrant for his arrest, Maryland Transportation Authority police said.Officers were helping Luis Torres of Smithfield, S.C., with mechanical problems when a routine check of his license plate showed he was wanted on sex charges in Aiken County, S.C., a transportation authority spokeswoman said.Torres, who was northbound on Interstate 95, ran from his car but was quickly chased down and arrested.
NEWS
August 20, 2003
THE REMINDER last week that daily life can be cast back to the Gilded Age at the flick of a circuit breaker was sobering. But even that might not push lawmakers past their sluggish, top-heavy approach to the nation's energy policy. Take the ponderous bills that House and Senate committees have debated over the past few years and are to start cobbling together next month - please. Congress doesn't need to reach consensus on the merits of fuel-efficient cars or drilling in Alaska before agreeing that the nation's creaky transmission connectors need fixing.
FEATURES
By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | May 18, 2012
The Preakness is, let's face it, the dark horse on the nation's party planning circuit. After all, the second leg of the Triple Crown is squeezed between its more challenging and prestigious cousins, the Kentucky Derby and the Belmont Stakes. And, it's held in proudly fashion-averse Baltimore. Nonetheless, there are a few pioneering socialites and trailblazing doyennes living in states such as Kentucky and Pennsylvania and New Jersey. For them, the Preakness' underdog status practically demands a celebration — and the more fancy hats and black-eyed Susan centerpieces the better.
NEWS
By Yvonne Wenger, The Baltimore Sun | May 3, 2012
Maryland's highest court has upheld a law allowing police to listen in on cell phone calls that suspects make outside the state, a tool that authorities say is key to fighting the drug trade. The 5-2 Court of Appeals ruling is a victory for law enforcement, said Brian Kleinbord, chief of criminal appeals division for the Maryland Attorney General's Office. "It means that drug dealers can't evade a wiretap by driving their cars across the state line. " But dissenters argued that multi-state wiretaps are the latest example of police using advances in technology to chip away at privacy rights.
NEWS
By Rick Maese and Rick Maese,rick.maese@baltsun.com | October 18, 2008
Bobbie Monahan has a plan if her candidate, Barack Obama, doesn't win on Election Day. "I swear to God, I'm going to Canada," said the 63-year-old homelessness counselor. And with that, Monahan boarded a bus heading north. But not for the border. She and dozens of other Obama supporters were bound for Philadelphia on a recent weekend, among the thousands of Marylanders who've been devoting time to the dueling presidential campaigns - and leaving the state to maximize their impact. The concept of exporting volunteers and resources to competitive states isn't new. But state political observers say the scale, the impact and the stakes have never been higher than this year.
NEWS
By Jon S. Cardin | October 16, 2007
There are two major reasons to expand state gaming. One is the irrefutable evidence that Maryland is bleeding more than $400 million annually as our residents travel across state lines to gamble. The other is that most Marylanders simply want it. To that end, in creating a responsible gaming policy, we need to consider six factors: First, as disposable income is fixed, increased gambling by Marylanders will offset state sales tax revenue by a respective amount. For example, if Gov. Martin O'Malley's proposal to increase the sales tax to 6 percent passes, the state's take on slots revenue - about 4 percent - means Maryland loses money by converting in-state sales transactions to slots revenue.
NEWS
By Julie Scharper and Julie Scharper,Sun reporter | June 28, 2007
They descended on the shopping center parking lot carrying tents, guitars, kiddie pools - even a cracked leather ottoman. Teenagers came in groups, parents led broods of children and one family arrived with seven members, ranging in age from 3 to 85. As they spread out on the steaming asphalt, one word was on everyone's lips: chicken. Dozens of people camped out at an Owings Mills shopping center last night, waiting not for concert tickets or the latest Harry Potter book, but for a year's worth of chicken sandwiches.
NEWS
By Jennifer Skalka and Andrew A. Green and Jennifer Skalka and Andrew A. Green,Sun reporters | January 18, 2007
Martin O'Malley, sworn in as the state's 61st governor yesterday as a 19-gun salute echoed in wintry air, promised "a new day in Maryland" marked by bipartisan respect and a fresh resolve to improve the lives of state residents. "For too long in the capitals of our nation and our states, we've acted as if our people have somehow lost the capacity to sacrifice and to make tough choices, but, my friends, to govern is to choose," O'Malley said from a podium outside the historic State House.
NEWS
By Jon S. Cardin | October 16, 2007
There are two major reasons to expand state gaming. One is the irrefutable evidence that Maryland is bleeding more than $400 million annually as our residents travel across state lines to gamble. The other is that most Marylanders simply want it. To that end, in creating a responsible gaming policy, we need to consider six factors: First, as disposable income is fixed, increased gambling by Marylanders will offset state sales tax revenue by a respective amount. For example, if Gov. Martin O'Malley's proposal to increase the sales tax to 6 percent passes, the state's take on slots revenue - about 4 percent - means Maryland loses money by converting in-state sales transactions to slots revenue.
NEWS
By Marcia Myers and Marcia Myers,SUN STAFF | February 6, 1996
A government patent attorney, who was the first person arrested under a 1994 federal law that prohibits crossing state lines to have sex with a minor, received a 10-month sentence yesterday.In April, after days of sexually explicit computer conversations pTC with someone he thought was a 13-year-old girl, James Frederic Childress traveled from his home in Virginia for a meeting with the teen at Montgomery Mall. Instead, he was met by a team of FBI agents that included Patricia Ferrante, the agent who had posed as his computer pen pal.Childress was among the first people arrested as a result of the FBI's Operation Innocent Images, a nationwide crackdown on computer child pornography crimes.
NEWS
August 27, 2006
There's plenty on the mind of the average Maryland voter these days - public education, health care, crime, jobs, development and the environment, to name a few real-life areas of concern. There is not a burning desire to bring thousands of slot machines into the state, except within the hearts of those who would directly benefit - and once again, on the second floor of the State House. Last weekend, Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr. told a gathering of county officials in Ocean City that he would push for a "funding source" to finance school construction over the next four years.
NEWS
By NOAM N. LEVEY and NOAM N. LEVEY,LOS ANGELES TIMES | July 26, 2006
WASHINGTON -- Senate Republicans pushed through legislation yesterday making it a federal crime to evade parental consent laws by taking minors across state lines for abortions. The 65-34 Senate vote - which came just a week after a bill on stem cell research divided several leading Republicans from their anti-abortion base - gave the party another plank for its "values" agenda. Building on parental consent requirements in many states, the vote marked another victory in the drive by abortion opponents to limit access to the procedure.
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