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NEWS
By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | January 25, 2013
Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake and city schools chief Andres Alonso are scheduled to travel to Annapolis Monday to meet with Gov. Martin O'Malley and top legislators on a $2.4 billion plan to rebuild Baltimore's aging public schools, the chairman of the city's House delegation said Friday. Del. Curt Anderson said he and Del. Keith Haynes, who sits on the subcommittee that will review the plan, are expected to join the meeting with House Speaker Michael E. Busch and the governor.
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NEWS
By William E. Kirwan | June 28, 2014
As I look back over my 12 years as chancellor of the University System of Maryland (USM), one of the developments in which I take the most pride has been the USM's genuine partnership with state leaders in Annapolis. Now that the primary is over and the election looms, I encourage candidates for office across Maryland, especially those running for governor, to commit themselves to upholding this partnership. It has served our students, the state and the citizens exceptionally well.
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NEWS
By Dee Hodges | December 9, 2009
S tate Senate President Mike Miller and House Speaker Michael E. Busch spoke at a recent event sponsored by the Annapolis Forum. The event, which previews state government for Naval Academy midshipmen, was open for the first time to others and dealt heavily with concerns facing the upcoming General Assembly session. It was worth attending just to have the two leaders spell out their views of Maryland and their governing philosophies. Questions were submitted in advance by the audience.
NEWS
By Bob Gallagher and Joanna Diamond | June 17, 2014
It's not easy telling the next governor of Maryland that he or she needs to start thinking right now about manure, but the winner of this fall's election won't have any time to waste. Toxic algal blooms and intersex fish are two examples of the threat the agriculture industry poses. We like to think of our farms as open space and natural operations that provide the food we need. But without proper pollution controls, not all 21st century farms are environmentally benign. Unfortunately, that threat is well documented in Maryland.
BUSINESS
By Natalie Sherman, The Baltimore Sun | January 27, 2014
Democratic legislative leaders gave partial support Monday to a push to raise the minimum wage, with some reiterating unwillingness to impose a "one size fits all" increase across the state. They provided few other clues as to how they will respond to Gov. Martin O'Malley's call to lift the state's minimum pay from $7.25 an hour to $10.10 by 2016, with future increases tied to inflation. "That's a debate we will have in committee," House Speaker Michael E. Busch said Monday at a breakfast for business leaders hosted by the Greater Baltimore Committee.
NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler and Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | April 2, 2014
Ending a standoff that had stalled the governor's top legislative priority, General Assembly leaders said Wednesday that they have reached a deal to raise Maryland's minimum wage, while also boosting the pay of workers caring for the developmentally disabled. Under terms unveiled by Sen. Thomas M. Middleton and approved by the Senate Finance Committee, the minimum wage would rise incrementally to $10.10 by July 2018, two years later than Gov. Martin O'Malley proposed. At the same time, funding for state-paid workers who care for the developmentally disabled would increase by about $30 million a year starting in fiscal 2016, Middleton said.
NEWS
The Baltimore Sun | March 15, 2014
An Anne Arundel County man was arrested Friday after police said he threatened violence against a county councilman and the presiding officers of the General Assembly - an incident allegedly touched off by his outrage over the construction of a drainage pond. Paul David Grimm, 58, of 100 block of Tarks Lane in Severna Park, was charged with three counts of threatening a public official. Police said the threats came after Councilman Dick Ladd visited Grimm's neighborhood to discuss his concerns about the project in his community.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | December 12, 2012
Business leaders and county officials are urging the governor and General Assembly to increase Maryland's gas tax or find another way to raise hundreds of millions of dollars for road and transit projects — even in the face of public opposition. More than 100 people packed a hearing room in Annapolis on Wednesday to discuss strategies. They want to persuade legislators to raise the money needed to develop major new transportation projects, not just maintain what the state already has. Prince George's County Executive Rushern L. Baker III said the General Assembly needs to act in the legislative session that begins next month, not "kick the can down the road.
NEWS
By Erin Cox, The Baltimore Sun | September 4, 2013
Gov. Martin O'Malley and state lawmakers for the first time dipped into a $100 million fund set aside to deal with the impact of the federal sequester, lessening the blow of automatic federal spending cuts on the state's poor and elderly. O'Malley announced Wednesday that a legislative committee approved his request to spend $9 million on programs that used to be paid for by the federal government, including meals for senior citizens and early childhood education for low-income children.
NEWS
By Andrew A. Green and Andrew A. Green,Sun reporter | July 19, 2007
State leaders are considering the first changes to Maryland's income tax brackets in 40 years to make them more progressive - and to help erase the state's projected $1.5 billion budget shortfall. The tax is essentially flat - the highest bracket kicks in at $3,000 in income - and the top rate of 4.75 percent is the seventh-lowest in the country. Gov. Martin O'Malley said this week that he wants to find ways to make the state's tax structure more progressive, and key legislators, including Senate President Thomas V. Mike Miller, have expressed support for at least a temporary tax increase on top earners, such as one that helped Maryland weather its last major fiscal crisis, in the early 1990s.
NEWS
April 14, 2014
Maryland is already one of the best educated states in the nation, ranking at or near the top when it comes to the percentage of residents with college and post-graduate degrees. But state leaders, looking at an increasingly competitive, knowledge-based global economy, think that's not going to be nearly good enough. About 45 percent of the state's adults have at least an associate's degree now, but state leaders decided in 2009 that it should aim to bump that up to 55 percent by 2025.
NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler and Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | April 4, 2014
With lawmakers still far apart on how to overhaul Maryland's bail system, legislative leaders and the O'Malley administration have cobbled together a short-term fix that involves an executive order and recruiting private attorneys for little or no pay to represent poor defendants. At the direction of legislative leaders, a joint House and Senate committee has set aside $10 million in the state budget to address a ruling by Maryland's highest court that the current bail system is unconstitutional because it fails to provide lawyers early enough in the process.
NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler and Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | April 2, 2014
Ending a standoff that had stalled the governor's top legislative priority, General Assembly leaders said Wednesday that they have reached a deal to raise Maryland's minimum wage, while also boosting the pay of workers caring for the developmentally disabled. Under terms unveiled by Sen. Thomas M. Middleton and approved by the Senate Finance Committee, the minimum wage would rise incrementally to $10.10 by July 2018, two years later than Gov. Martin O'Malley proposed. At the same time, funding for state-paid workers who care for the developmentally disabled would increase by about $30 million a year starting in fiscal 2016, Middleton said.
NEWS
The Baltimore Sun | March 15, 2014
An Anne Arundel County man was arrested Friday after police said he threatened violence against a county councilman and the presiding officers of the General Assembly - an incident allegedly touched off by his outrage over the construction of a drainage pond. Paul David Grimm, 58, of 100 block of Tarks Lane in Severna Park, was charged with three counts of threatening a public official. Police said the threats came after Councilman Dick Ladd visited Grimm's neighborhood to discuss his concerns about the project in his community.
BUSINESS
By Natalie Sherman, The Baltimore Sun | January 27, 2014
Democratic legislative leaders gave partial support Monday to a push to raise the minimum wage, with some reiterating unwillingness to impose a "one size fits all" increase across the state. They provided few other clues as to how they will respond to Gov. Martin O'Malley's call to lift the state's minimum pay from $7.25 an hour to $10.10 by 2016, with future increases tied to inflation. "That's a debate we will have in committee," House Speaker Michael E. Busch said Monday at a breakfast for business leaders hosted by the Greater Baltimore Committee.
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | January 2, 2014
Nearly two out of every three people signing up for health care coverage so far on Maryland's troubled insurance exchange qualified for Medicaid — helping the state top its goal for the program's enrollment. Enrolling more lower-income residents in the state and federal insurance program has been embraced by state leaders as a success amid all the exchange's difficulties. Launched Oct. 1 to offer Maryland's uninsured access to coverage, the exchange has been plagued by problems that state officials only recently said they mostly fixed — days before the deadline to sign up for coverage starting with the new year.
NEWS
By SUMATHI REDDY and SUMATHI REDDY,SUN REPORTER | June 1, 2006
A Baltimore Circuit Court judge has dismissed a $14 million lawsuit accusing city and state leaders of failing to protect the Dawson family from the 2002 firebombing that killed the couple and their five children. Judge M. Brooke Murdock struck down an argument from survivors that the city created danger by soliciting participation through its "Believe" campaign and by encouraging residents to report criminal activity to police. The judge ruled that the advertisements were directed at all Baltimore residents and not to the Dawsons specifically.
NEWS
By William E. Kirwan | June 28, 2014
As I look back over my 12 years as chancellor of the University System of Maryland (USM), one of the developments in which I take the most pride has been the USM's genuine partnership with state leaders in Annapolis. Now that the primary is over and the election looms, I encourage candidates for office across Maryland, especially those running for governor, to commit themselves to upholding this partnership. It has served our students, the state and the citizens exceptionally well.
NEWS
By Erin Cox, The Baltimore Sun | September 4, 2013
Gov. Martin O'Malley and state lawmakers for the first time dipped into a $100 million fund set aside to deal with the impact of the federal sequester, lessening the blow of automatic federal spending cuts on the state's poor and elderly. O'Malley announced Wednesday that a legislative committee approved his request to spend $9 million on programs that used to be paid for by the federal government, including meals for senior citizens and early childhood education for low-income children.
NEWS
By Carol M. Browner | August 18, 2013
During my service as the secretary of Environmental Regulation in Florida and Environmental Protection Agency administrator, I came to appreciate that state action is central to strong environmental protection. Working with the states, the EPA has established and implemented important pollution limits for dangerous toxic emissions including arsenic, mercury and lead. It only makes sense to do the same for carbon pollution, just as Gov. Martin O'Malley recently proposed. Maryland has spent decades trying to reverse the impacts of the dangerous pollution of our air and water by fighting fiercely to protect the Chesapeake Bay and the important economic benefits it provides to the state and the region.
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