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NEWS
By Marcia Myers and Jean Thompson and Marcia Myers and Jean Thompson,SUN STAFF | February 14, 1997
An inquiry into boiler safety violations in Baltimore schools widened yesterday, with state regulators saying they will question school officials as well as inspectors and executives of the company responsible for inspecting the equipment.The regulators were responding to a new report that sharply contrasts the conditions described by Hartford (Conn.) Steam Boiler Inspection and Insurance Co. employees with those documented by state inspectors.According to the report, Hartford Steam inspectors found 28 violations in 195 inspections, none serious enough to merit a "red tag" -- which prevents the school system from using the equipment until repairs are made.
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NEWS
By David Wood and Matthew Hay Brown and David Wood and Matthew Hay Brown,Sun Reporters | December 8, 2007
WASHINGTON -- Howard J. "Cookie" Krongard, the embattled State Department inspector general who is accused of hindering federal investigations of the Blackwater security firm in Iraq and who has engaged in a bitter public feud with his brother, Alvin B. "Buzzy" Krongard, resigned yesterday. Dubbed by some in Washington as the "bickering brothers from Baltimore," "Cookie" Krongard, 66, a former international lawyer, and "Buzzy" Krongard, a former investment banker and senior CIA official, traded accusations last month over whether the State Department inspector general knew that "Buzzy" was serving on an advisory board of Blackwater USA, currently under investigation by the State and Justice departments.
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NEWS
January 20, 1999
THE DISCOVERY OF safety defects in a hot-water system at Carroll County's Linton Springs Elementary -- five months after the school opened -- raises serious questions about the quality of state inspections. A routine, scheduled state inspection at the Eldersburg school this month found the wrong pressure-relief valve installed and the lack of back-flow devices that prevent scalding water from entering cold-water pipes. A state inspection last August, required to open the 750-pupil school, failed to detect the violations.
NEWS
April 8, 2007
Arthur F. Martin, a retired inspector for the Maryland Department of Agriculture, died of complications from a heart attack Monday at Oak Crest Village in Parkville. The former Pikesville resident was 97. Mr. Martin was raised on a farm in Smithsburg, east of Hagerstown. After graduating from Smithsburg High School, he earned a degree in agriculture from the University of Maryland in 1931. That year, he began working as a food inspector. He graded and inspected dairy and poultry products throughout the state, said his son-in-law, Gary Heichel of Martinsburg, W.Va.
NEWS
By Johnathon E. Briggs and Johnathon E. Briggs,SUN STAFF | June 2, 2001
After finding environmental damage from a network of dirt bike trails, state inspectors have given the owners of a wooded tract in Davidsonville -- including a teen-age motocross star -- 30 days to submit a restoration plan. After the inspectors were given full access to the Anne Arundel County site yesterday, Maryland Department of the Environment spokesman Richard McIntyre said that most of the violations were on the property owned by 17-year-old professional motocross sensation Travis Pastrana and his parents, Robert and Deborah Pastrana.
NEWS
By Robert Guy Matthews and Robert Guy Matthews,SUN STAFF | March 6, 1996
Seven months behind schedule, 67 percent over budget and still not in perfect condition, state inspectors yesterday allowed the Quarantine Road Sanitary Landfill pond was cleared yesterday by state inspectors to return to operation on a conditional basis.The pond has been the center of controversy since a public works department chief, alleging that using the pond would contaminate ground water, defied orders last summer and closed it.Kenneth J. Strong, then head of the Bureau of Solid Waste, sparked a state inquiry after charging that shoddy repair work done during scheduled maintenance to the pond could endanger the environment.
NEWS
By Walter F. Roche Jr. and Walter F. Roche Jr.,SUN STAFF | April 30, 2004
A report last year by a national accreditation agency on the error-plagued laboratory at Maryland General Hospital gave the facility generally high marks even though inspectors found that it had not been following a required quality assurance plan for a year before the review. The "confidential" accreditation report, which was released yesterday by the state Department of Health and Mental Hygiene, was completed by the College of American Pathologists in April 2003. At the same time, state inspectors later learned, the testing facility was experiencing major problems and was issuing test results for HIV and hepatitis even though instrument readings indicated that the tests might be wrong.
NEWS
By Jay Merwin and Jay Merwin,Evening Sun Staff | January 14, 1991
Come April 1, someone else's hand will squeeze the spleen, slice the glands and stamp the carcasses as the steers are slaughtered at Maurer and Miller meat processors in Manchester.State inspector George Davies plans to take up a new career anyway, which is a good thing, because the state, in a cost-cutting move, plans next spring to turn over to the federal government the work now done by Davies and 38 other full-time inspectors.Maryland is one of 28 states that still inspect small, in-state meat and poultry operations.
NEWS
December 10, 2004
FEDERAL and state officials who were shocked last spring to discover that Maryland General Hospital's lab had sent hundreds of patients potentially erroneous results from tests for HIV and hepatitis feared they had found just the tip of the iceberg of inspection oversights. Recent findings of overlooked lab failings at Good Samaritan Hospital and Union Memorial suggest their concern was justified. While most involved seem to be taking good-faith steps to correct flaws in the process for ensuring laboratory safety and accuracy, there is a clear need for tightened government standards.
NEWS
By Marcia Myers and Marcia Myers,SUN STAFF | October 17, 1997
A state panel recommended yesterday that no disciplinary action be taken against the private boiler inspectors whose work was called into question last year after the discovery of hundreds of safety violations in the Baltimore schools.After a boiler accident in June 1996 seriously burned a 7-year-old at Hazelwood Elementary School, state inspectors conducted a random review of schools that revealed faulty safety valves, painted-over controls and other problems. Of 109 pieces of equipment inspected in 42 schools, not one passed state inspection, raising serious questions about the quality of the work by private inspectors for Hartford Steam Boiler Inspection and Insurance Co.In addition, a review by The Sun in June found numerous instances of "double-booking," in which the private inspectors filed two distinct sets of reports: one detailing problems, which went to schools; and the other attesting to the safe condition of the equipment, which was forwarded to the state.
BUSINESS
By Nancy Jones-Bonbrest and Nancy Jones-Bonbrest,Special to the Sun | January 3, 2007
Bob Trumbule Entomologist Maryland Department of Agriculture, Beltsville Salary --$53,000 a year Age --48 Years on the job --20 How he got started --After getting an undergraduate degree in horticulture and botany and a master's degree in entomology, both from the University of Maryland, College Park, Trumbule went to work for the state Department of Agriculture. He started as a nursery inspector. Inspections --Businesses that sell plants, such as greenhouses, nurseries and landscapers, must be licensed by the state, which requires regular inspections.
NEWS
February 18, 2005
GOV. ROBERT L. Ehrlich Jr.'s lead-poisoning initiative is, on balance, a step forward for at-risk children, including city children. So why are Baltimore legislators against it? Because Mr. Ehrlich has wiped out the state's $375,000 appropriation for city lead-paint inspectors. In other words, the delegates are warning that if the governor is going to do something that might harm children, they'll do something to harm children, too. This would be amusing if it weren't such a serious matter.
NEWS
December 10, 2004
FEDERAL and state officials who were shocked last spring to discover that Maryland General Hospital's lab had sent hundreds of patients potentially erroneous results from tests for HIV and hepatitis feared they had found just the tip of the iceberg of inspection oversights. Recent findings of overlooked lab failings at Good Samaritan Hospital and Union Memorial suggest their concern was justified. While most involved seem to be taking good-faith steps to correct flaws in the process for ensuring laboratory safety and accuracy, there is a clear need for tightened government standards.
NEWS
By Julie Bell and Julie Bell,SUN STAFF | December 9, 2004
Good Samaritan Hospital's laboratory regularly failed to follow up on labeling problems that put patients at risk of errors such as receiving the wrong blood type, while Union Memorial Hospital's blood bank director didn't properly ensure the safety of transfusion recipients, state inspectors recently found. Both laboratories are at risk of getting kicked out of the Medicare program and losing their state licenses if these and other problems that inspectors found aren't corrected. But both also have submitted plans of correction to the state, and Carol Benner, director of the Maryland Office of Health Care Quality, said, "We're confident at this point that they're getting the problems fixed."
NEWS
By From staff reports | November 25, 2004
In Baltimore County Man sentenced to 50 years in prison for Timonium killing TOWSON - A 20-year-old Baltimore man was sentenced to 50 years in prison this week for the murder of a Morgan State University student after a college party in October last year at a Timonium bowling alley, a county prosecutor said. Christopher Ahmed Bacote pleaded guilty last month to first-degree murder and a handgun charge for fatally shooting Lorenzo Monroe Hardy III on Oct. 4 last year as Hardy was walking through the parking lot outside the AMF Bowling Alley on York Road.
NEWS
By Walter F. Roche Jr. and Walter F. Roche Jr.,SUN STAFF | April 30, 2004
A report last year by a national accreditation agency on the error-plagued laboratory at Maryland General Hospital gave the facility generally high marks even though inspectors found that it had not been following a required quality assurance plan for a year before the review. The "confidential" accreditation report, which was released yesterday by the state Department of Health and Mental Hygiene, was completed by the College of American Pathologists in April 2003. At the same time, state inspectors later learned, the testing facility was experiencing major problems and was issuing test results for HIV and hepatitis even though instrument readings indicated that the tests might be wrong.
NEWS
February 18, 2005
GOV. ROBERT L. Ehrlich Jr.'s lead-poisoning initiative is, on balance, a step forward for at-risk children, including city children. So why are Baltimore legislators against it? Because Mr. Ehrlich has wiped out the state's $375,000 appropriation for city lead-paint inspectors. In other words, the delegates are warning that if the governor is going to do something that might harm children, they'll do something to harm children, too. This would be amusing if it weren't such a serious matter.
NEWS
By Jean Thompson and Kate Shatzkin and Jean Thompson and Kate Shatzkin,SUN STAFF | October 11, 1996
Recent city and state inspections of boilers in Baltimore schools have revealed widespread code violations and safety problems that will require about $2 million in repairs and replacements this fall.When the inspections began last month, city officials did not anticipate purchasing large equipment and predicted that the majority of repairs required would be small jobs, such as installing safety valves.Now, the evaluation provides the city its first broad look at the effect of putting off boiler maintenance for years.
NEWS
By Laura Barnhardt and Laura Barnhardt,SUN STAFF | November 21, 2003
The Gaithersburg company that employed the three workers who drowned in a flash flood Wednesday in Woodlawn had been cited for more than 30 workplace safety violations, state and federal records show. A crane operator for Concrete General Inc. was killed on the job in 1988. Another employee's arms had to be amputated after he was shocked by a power line in 1982, and a Concrete General worker was rescued after a trench collapsed in 1995. Most recently, in 2000 and 2001, the company was cited six times for trenching violations, according to Maryland Occupational Safety and Health records.
NEWS
By Laura Barnhardt and Laura Barnhardt,SUN STAFF | November 21, 2003
The Gaithersburg company that employed the three workers who drowned in a flash flood Wednesday in Woodlawn had been cited for more than 30 workplace safety violations, state and federal records show. A crane operator for Concrete General Inc. was killed on the job in 1988. Another employee's arms had to be amputated after he was shocked by a power line in 1982, and a Concrete General worker was rescued after a trench collapsed in 1995. Most recently, in 2000 and 2001, the company was cited six times for trenching violations, according to Maryland Occupational Safety and Health records.
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