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NEWS
By Ellie Baublitz and Ellie Baublitz,Contributing Writer | March 16, 1994
Elderly residents who need to complete their tax forms, or have questions about whether they need to file a tax return this year, can get help through April 11 in time for the April 15 deadline.Tax Counseling for the Elderly is available free of charge around the county at Bureau of Aging senior centers. To take advantage of this program, residents must be 60 or older and meet guidelines that define a moderate income.The program is offered through the Carroll County Chapter of the American Association of Retired Persons, which has a contract with the Internal Revenue Service, said John Graybeal, a tax counselor at the Westminster Senior Center.
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NEWS
By Matthew Hay Brown | July 16, 2014
Republican gubernatorial nominee Larry Hogan told veterans Wednesday that he would eliminate the state income tax on military pensions if elected. “This tax is not only bad economic policy, it's also unfair to the men and women who have served our state and fought for our nation. You earned this tax break,” Hogan told members of the Maryland Department of the American Legion at their annual convention in Ocean City. “On day one we'll get to work on this,” he said. “And with the support of the 450,000 Maryland soldiers, sailors, airmen and Marines standing behind us, I'm confident we'll even be able to convince the tax-and-spend politicians in Annapolis that it is the right thing to do.” Hogan's campaign estimated that eliminating the tax would cost the state $40 million in revenue.
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NEWS
May 19, 2012
Maryland wants more of my money. It may not seem like a big tax increase being presented, but how much money does the state need? I am the so-called wealthy American who must pay more in taxes. Well I pay plenty of taxes so my politicians can yuk it up in their sky boxes. I pay 23.5 cents per gallon in gasoline taxes per fill-up. That's about $400 per year for two cars. I paid $300 in tolls to get to and from work. There was $41 to park for meetings in Baltimore, $180 to register my car, $1,600 in miscellaneous school fees (field trips, sporting events, uniforms, yearbook, prom, homecoming)
NEWS
By Michael Dresser | February 18, 2014
Republican gubernatorial candidate David R. Craig released a plan Tuesday would put Maryland on a "glide path" toward eliminating its state income tax while cutting total spending by a minimum of 3 percent a year. Craig, who has been Harford County executive for the past decade, said such a move would stimulate economic growth and halt a loss of population to states with lower taxes. "We must restore Maryland to the way it was and we need a governor who knows how to do it," he said.
NEWS
October 9, 1994
Until she fills in the gaps, Republican gubernatorial nominee Ellen R. Sauerbrey has a credibility problem in her grand-sounding plan to cut state income taxes 24 percent. Her failure to indicate how and where she will slash programs to pay for her tax reductions makes it impossible to judge if this is an election-year shell-game or a viable approach to shrinking government sensibly.Mrs. Sauerbrey's opponent, Democrat Parris Glendening, is no XTC paragon of virtue on fiscal questions, either.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | March 19, 2012
House Minority Leader Anthony J. O'Donnell staged a little political theater Monday as he attempted to testify against a tax-increase bill and was turned away by the chairwoman of the committee hearing the legislation. The occasion was a hearing on the Senate bill passed last week raising state income taxes. It was, like the hearings on most Senate bills coming over to the House, a sponsors-only event. When O'Donnell tried to follow the panel from the Senate to the witness stand, House Ways and Means Committee Chairwoman Sheila E. Hixson promptly ruled O'Donnell out  of order and adjourned the hearing.
NEWS
March 8, 1991
The so-called loophole in Maryland's tax law is more accurately a gaping inequity: Unlike the federal government, Maryland allows residents to exclude from taxation 40 percent of the profits from the sale of houses, stocks, bonds and other property. This tax break costs the state plenty. The newest statistics from the state comptroller's office show that in part because of the capital gains tax break, 77 Marylanders who earned an average of $430,785 a year paid no state income taxes at all in 1988.
BUSINESS
By Julius Westheimer | October 1, 1997
As the fourth quarter begins, where should you invest your money? It's a no-brainer, really. Your best bet -- even if means tightening your belt some -- is to maximize contributions to a 401 (k) plan where you work.A recent survey revealed shocking results: 40 percent of eligible PTC working men and women do not have a 401(k).Who can have such a plan? What are its benefits?Employees who are 21 with over one year of service are eligible. Once your plan is established, you may defer up to 15 percent of your compensation to a maximum of $9,500.
NEWS
By Robert Timberg and Robert Timberg,Sun Staff Writer | August 1, 1994
State Sen. Mary H. Boergers, a Democratic candidate for governor, has unveiled a two-pronged program to encourage so-called working families to save for their children's future college costs and reward those who pick a school in Maryland.Ms. Boergers, at recent newa conferences at Towson State and Bowie State universities, said she wants to re-activate the Maryland Minibond Plan as an investment vehicle for parents hoping to offset spiraling higher-education costs.The plan, in limbo since 1991, permits individuals to purchase tax-exempt state bonds in denominations as low as $500 rather than the usual $5,000 minimum.
NEWS
By Joan Jacobson and S. Mitra Kalita and Joan Jacobson and S. Mitra Kalita,SUN STAFF | June 4, 1996
The Waverly community in North Baltimore won a citywide competition yesterday to lure newcomers with one of the biggest tax breaks offered to homebuyers.Under the program to begin July 1, anyone buying a home in Waverly in the next three years will get a 40 percent discount in property taxes -- and a matching reduction in state income taxes.Community leaders said they hope the tax break will bring new life to the area, which has eclectic styles of architecture and a diverse population, both ethnically and economically.
NEWS
June 3, 2012
This Wednesday's planned opening of the half-billion-dollar Maryland Live! Casino at Arundel Mills marks a red-letter day in Maryland gaming history. The scale of the enormous, 330,000-square-foot facility is stunning: It will eventually house 4,750 slot machines (far more than any other Maryland facility) in addition to restaurants and entertainment. No doubt the opening will be a particularly satisfying moment for developer David Cordish and others at the Cordish Cos.who overcame a considerable number of obstacles, not least a 2010 voter referendum.
NEWS
May 19, 2012
Maryland wants more of my money. It may not seem like a big tax increase being presented, but how much money does the state need? I am the so-called wealthy American who must pay more in taxes. Well I pay plenty of taxes so my politicians can yuk it up in their sky boxes. I pay 23.5 cents per gallon in gasoline taxes per fill-up. That's about $400 per year for two cars. I paid $300 in tolls to get to and from work. There was $41 to park for meetings in Baltimore, $180 to register my car, $1,600 in miscellaneous school fees (field trips, sporting events, uniforms, yearbook, prom, homecoming)
NEWS
By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | March 19, 2012
House Minority Leader Anthony J. O'Donnell staged a little political theater Monday as he attempted to testify against a tax-increase bill and was turned away by the chairwoman of the committee hearing the legislation. The occasion was a hearing on the Senate bill passed last week raising state income taxes. It was, like the hearings on most Senate bills coming over to the House, a sponsors-only event. When O'Donnell tried to follow the panel from the Senate to the witness stand, House Ways and Means Committee Chairwoman Sheila E. Hixson promptly ruled O'Donnell out  of order and adjourned the hearing.
NEWS
By Larry Carson | larry.carson@baltsun.com | March 9, 2010
The latest state income tax payments to local governments fell $61.8 million year over year, piling new fiscal woes atop budgets already reeling from state cuts, high snow removal costs and earlier revenue declines. The declines in payments from the state to county governments at the end of February put an added $29.4 million burden on Montgomery County, which was already facing a projected $761.5 million shortfall by June 30, according to the Maryland comptroller's office. Prince George's and Charles counties were alone among Maryland's 24 jurisdictions to receive more in the fourth quarter of 2009 than in 2008.
BUSINESS
By Jay Hancock and Jay Hancock,Jay.Hancock@baltsun.com | May 22, 2009
The millionaires are fleeing Maryland, all right. But not because of the measly tax surcharge on income over $1 million. They're bugging out because of Maryland's estate tax, which applies to a bigger portion of a dead person's hoard than the federal estate tax or those in other states. Strange to tell, rich refugees didn't want to speak with me. But their lawyers did. They suggest the high inheritance tax costs the state a lot more than it brings in because absconding aristocrats don't pay any Maryland tax, let alone the one when they die. "For years and years, I have had clients who complained about Maryland taxes and never took any action," says Lowell G. Herman.
NEWS
By Andrew A. Green and James Drew and Andrew A. Green and James Drew,SUN REPORTERS | November 8, 2007
Del. Jon S. Cardin was having misgivings about elements of Gov. Martin O'Malley's tax and slot-machine plan when the governor invited him to his office on the second floor of the State House. O'Malley sat on the sofa late one afternoon last week and offered Cardin water or soda -- he declined -- and they talked about the distribution of funds from a proposed change in the transfer tax, among other details. There was no LBJ-style browbeating, the delegate said. Cardin said the governor, in shirtsleeves, seemed to want to reach a compromise, not just get his way. Though the stakes are high for O'Malley as he tries to persuade Maryland lawmakers to vote for his plan for dealing with a projected $1.7 billion budget shortfall, Cardin and others who have received personal attention from the governor say that so far, he hasn't leaned on them.
NEWS
By Larry Carson and Larry Carson,SUN STAFF | May 20, 1996
Homebuyers seeking some financial relief can find it this summer in Hillendale, a Baltimore County neighborhood chosen for a new state program that offers substantial tax breaks as a way to boost homeownership and stabilize troubled communities.Under the pilot program, which also will extend to a city neighborhood and begins July 1, anyone who buys a house in Hillendale in the next three years will get a 40 percent reduction in property taxes -- and a matching reduction in state income taxes.
NEWS
By Melissa Harris and Melissa Harris,SUN STAFF | March 18, 2005
GOV. ROBERT L. Ehrlich Jr.'s popular promise to eliminate taxes on the military retirees' pensions likely will come up for its first vote next week in a Maryland House of Delegates subcommittee. Retirees who served for at least 20 years on active duty would be eligible for the tax exemption, to be phased in over four years. Veterans would not pay taxes on 20 percent of their military retiree income in 2006, 40 percent in 2007 and so on until 2010, when all of it would be tax-free. Both houses of the General Assembly held hearings on the issue last month, and Henry Fawell, an Ehrlich spokesman, said that Speaker of the House Michael E. Busch and Senate President Thomas V. Mike Miller have testified in favor of the bill.
NEWS
By Melissa Harris and Melissa Harris,SUN STAFF | March 18, 2005
GOV. ROBERT L. Ehrlich Jr.'s popular promise to eliminate taxes on the military retirees' pensions likely will come up for its first vote next week in a Maryland House of Delegates subcommittee. Retirees who served for at least 20 years on active duty would be eligible for the tax exemption, to be phased in over four years. Veterans would not pay taxes on 20 percent of their military retiree income in 2006, 40 percent in 2007 and so on until 2010, when all of it would be tax-free. Both houses of the General Assembly held hearings on the issue last month, and Henry Fawell, an Ehrlich spokesman, said that Speaker of the House Michael E. Busch and Senate President Thomas V. Mike Miller have testified in favor of the bill.
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