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By Gadi Dechter and Gadi Dechter,gadi.dechter@baltsun.com | December 18, 2008
Gov. Martin O'Malley and dozens of others who work out of the nation's oldest operating capitol will begin moving back into the Maryland State House early next week, as a more than $10 million renovation project to the stately building ends in the days before the legislature convenes for its 426th session. "I never thought we'd move back," O'Malley joked, brandishing an oversized golden key given to him by the Department of General Services at yesterday's Board of Public Works meeting.
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NEWS
By Marina Sarris and Marina Sarris,Evening Sun Staff | October 2, 1991
Hundreds of Maryland state troopers and their families marched in neat formation to the State House in Annapolis this morning to protest the governor's plan to fire more than 100 of their co-workers.Uniformed officers carried banners reading "Save Your Troopers." They formed a sea of khaki as they walked down Rowe Boulevard, forcing that main route into Annapolis to close temporarily.As they passed state government offices along the way, office workers leaned out windows and shouted their support.
NEWS
September 20, 1991
Bad news continues to dog Maryland's fiscal leaders. Now the state's current-year deficit is pegged at somewhere between $395 million and $450 million. That's on top of next year's predicted shortfall of nearly $800 million. Yet there still is no agreement on how to close this $1.25 billion budget gap, or when.It will take a combination of drastic program cuts, layoffs and higher taxes to put Maryland's state budget back in balance. The longer legislative leaders wait before acting, the higher the deficit -- and the shorter the fiscal time-frame to make meaningful spending cuts or tax changes.
NEWS
By John W. Frece and John W. Frece,Staff Writer | May 26, 1993
Marvin Mandel is returning to Maryland's historic State House, this time on canvas.Twenty-four years after Mr. Mandel replaced Spiro T. Agnew as Maryland governor, 16 years after he was convicted of mail fraud and racketeering and sent to federal prison and four years after he was exonerated of his crimes, his official portrait is finally being painted.Unlike the paintings of most other high state officials, however, the $25,000 painting of the former governor by Southern Maryland portraitist Peter Egeli is being paid for entirely with private funds.
NEWS
By Frank Langfitt and Frank Langfitt,Sun Staff Writer | December 10, 1994
Gov.-elect Parris N. Glendening and some Maryland lawmakers say top state lobbyist Bruce C. Bereano should not return to Annapolis next month because of his recent mail-fraud conviction.If Bereano insists on continuing his lobbying practice, "I think it's obviously going to add to the mistrust that many voters have of the way the governmental process works currently," Mr. Glendening said."Were I in his position, I certainly would not be involved in any lobbying activity at this time."The General Assembly's most powerful members, Senate President Thomas V. Mike Miller Jr. and House Speaker Casper R. Taylor Jr., declined to take a position on the issue.
NEWS
By Robert Timberg and Robert Timberg,Staff Writer | October 14, 1993
Marvin Mandel, backed by a generation of political figures who dominated the government of Maryland for decades, returned to the State House yesterday evening for an event many of those present called long overdue.Mr. Mandel, 73, the convicted, imprisoned, pardoned and legally exonerated former governor, sat quietly by, a look of melancholy playing across his features, as his portrait was finally hung in a place of honor, along with the portraits of most of his predecessors.He brightened considerably when his turn came to speak.
NEWS
By Michael Olesker | January 20, 2000
HERE IN civilized Maryland, we do not fly the flag of the Confederacy over our State House. We look with disdain upon those South Carolina rednecks who fight the Civil War 135 years after its alleged conclusion. Outside our State House here in civilized Annapolis, instead of a flag that symbolizes enslavement of human beings, we display a marvelous statue to honor one man. His name was Roger B. Taney. He was chief justice of the United States. OK, so he did help spark the Civil War. In South Carolina, those thousands of people who gathered this week to protest the Confederate flag flying over the statehouse in Columbia have now made their way home.
NEWS
By William Thompson and William Thompson,Evening Sun Staff | December 20, 1990
The most polite guys in the State House these days wear black combat boots and light blue uniforms and go to bed behind prison bars.As members of 1st Alpha Company -- part of the state prison system's experimental boot camp program for young inmates -- the 11 men are assigned to sweep the halls, polish the brass door plates and generally keep things tidy inside the State House.Although visitors to the State House have been accustomed for years to seeing prisoners perform custodial duties, the appearance this week of the boot camp inmates caught many people by surprise -- first by their appearance and then by their courtesy.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,SUN STAFF | May 26, 2004
James Edward Chambers, who became a discreet confidant of Maryland legislators and lobbyists while operating a shoeshine stand in the State House for more than half a century, died yesterday of congestive heart failure at the Genesis Spa Creek Center in Annapolis. He was 86. "To know the State House, you had to know Jimmy," said former Gov. Marvin Mandel. "He was really a fixture. He knew everyone and everyone knew him. When I first came into the legislature, he was there and he's been shining my shoes ever since.
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