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NEWS
April 14, 1994
For too many years, society ignored state psychiatric hospitals and their patients.Often tucked away in rural areas, the hospitals were easy to avoid, and many patients were locked up and forgotten. As a result, the public paid little, if any, attention to state mental health programs or institutions.People no longer seem so bent on keeping these mental hospitals out of sight and out of mind.Unexpectedly large crowds turned out this month for the first two public hearings on the fate of three central Maryland state hospitals for the mentally ill that are being considered for closure -- Spring Grove in Baltimore County, Springfield in Carroll County and Crownsville in Anne Arundel County.
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NEWS
By John J. Boronow and Steven S. Sharfstein | December 29, 2013
Treatment refusal occurs in medical/surgical settings across the world every day: a child with leukemia resisting a painful bone-marrow biopsy, an elderly man with Alzheimer's fighting his medication, a woman awakening from a coma and demanding release. And in most instances, "society" - as represented by the family, the health care providers and our legal institutions - has well-established, ethical, effective and efficient mechanisms for enabling the treatment to proceed. But that same society frequently fails people with severe mental illness who also have a related affliction known as "anosognosia" - essentially the inability to recognize one's own illness, however obvious it may be to everyone else.
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NEWS
By Dan Fesperman and Dan Fesperman,SUN STAFF | June 3, 2004
State health officials say an investigation has turned up no other defendants being mistakenly detained in state hospitals, as in the case of James Dunkes, the Baltimore County man who was locked up at Spring Grove Hospital Center for six years after charges against him were dropped. The review began last week after Spring Grove officials learned of Dunkes' plight. Dunkes, 45, was committed to Spring Grove in early 1996 after being declared mentally unfit to stand trial because of brain damage suffered in a 1982 auto accident.
NEWS
By Linda Raines | January 28, 2013
Conventional wisdom indicates that a host of mental health issues will be up for discussion during the General Assembly's 2013 legislative session. This is welcome news for the one in five Marylanders living with mental illness who are struggling to access the services they need. The current attention to mental health speaks to the longstanding inadequacy of the community mental health safety net in this country. More than 60 years have passed since we opened the wards of inhumane psychiatric hospitals for public inspection nationwide, as depicted with heart-wrenching clarity in the 1949 Baltimore Sun expose "Maryland's Shame.
NEWS
February 7, 1992
After a welcome hiatus, Gov. William Donald Schaefer is up to his old peevish tricks again. This time his ire has cost the state of Maryland $260,000 in federal funds that would have been used to protect the interests of the mentally ill.What annoyed the easily annoyed governor is that the legal group that would have received the funds is anathema to him. That's because the Maryland Disability Law Center is an aggressive protector of the rights of the...
NEWS
By John J. Boronow and Steven S. Sharfstein | December 29, 2013
Treatment refusal occurs in medical/surgical settings across the world every day: a child with leukemia resisting a painful bone-marrow biopsy, an elderly man with Alzheimer's fighting his medication, a woman awakening from a coma and demanding release. And in most instances, "society" - as represented by the family, the health care providers and our legal institutions - has well-established, ethical, effective and efficient mechanisms for enabling the treatment to proceed. But that same society frequently fails people with severe mental illness who also have a related affliction known as "anosognosia" - essentially the inability to recognize one's own illness, however obvious it may be to everyone else.
BUSINESS
By Blair S. Walker | November 20, 1991
Calvin M. Pierson starts his new job as president of the Maryland Hospital Association upbeat and optimistic.He's concerned about the state's $450 million budget deficit and a resulting $34.4 million in state Medicaid cuts to state hospitals. But Mr. Pierson has dealt with similar problems before. He encountered pretty much the same scenario in Rhode Island, where he headed that state's hospital association before coming to Maryland a few weeks ago."Rhode Island actually went into the recession before the state of Maryland," Mr. Pierson said this week.
NEWS
By Jackie Powder and Jackie Powder,Sun Staff Writer | February 12, 1995
After studying the issue for 10 months, a state health department task force has failed to decide which of three Central Maryland psychiatric hospitals should be closed.In a report released Friday, the task force recommended that one of the three hospitals -- Springfield Hospital Center in Sykesville, Crownsville Hospital Center in Crownsville or Spring Grove Hospital Center in Catonsville -- be identified for closing by June 1997. The hospital would then be closed in 2000."Despite diligent efforts, we were unable to distinguish definitive factors that would allow us to identify a specific hospital for consolidation or closure," task force chairman James R. Stanton said.
NEWS
February 27, 1992
Gov. William Donald Schaefer has taken a swipe at the Maryland Disability Law Center by refusing to sign a form that would expedite release of $260,000 in federal funds to defend the rights of the mentally ill in state hospitals. The administration insists there is justification for this action, which is little more than a warning to MDLC to stop suing the state at every turn.Other legal services groups that represent individuals in state facilities have reached formal protocols with the Schaefer administration to resolve disputes.
NEWS
January 2, 2000
STATE regulators placed Maryland hospitals on a rate-loss diet a few years ago, but the bureaucrats may have overdone it: For some medical centers, it has turned into a starvation diet that could threaten patients' well-being. Indeed, there is evidence that regulators' cutbacks on hospital rate charges helped precipitate staffing reductions at Shady Grove Adventist Hospital in Rockville, especially nursing shortages, that led to serious medical problems for patients. Shady Grove's accreditation is now threatened.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton and Allan Vought, Baltimore Sun Media Group | August 16, 2012
Alexander Kinyua, the college student accused of killing a family friend and ingesting his heart and brain, has been declared incompetent to stand trial, according to court records. Harford County State's Attorney Joseph I. Cassilly said in an Aug. 13 letter that prosecutors had reviewed a report from Clifton T. Perkins Hospital, the state's maximum-security psychiatric hospital, and agreed to the designation without a court hearing on the matter. Kinyua, 21, has pleaded not criminally responsible on charges of first-degree murder and use of a dangerous weapon in connection with the May killing of Kujoe Bonsafo Agyei-Kodie, a Ghanaian national who had been staying with his family in their Joppatowne home.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | July 10, 2012
Ilean H. Jennings, a cosmetologist who had been supervisor of barbers and beauticians at the old Crownsville State Hospital, died July 4 from complications of Alzheimer's disease at her Severna Park home. She was 84. The daughter of a businessman and a homemaker, Ilean Elizabeth Hall was born and raised in Magothy. She attended Wiley Bates High School and later earned her General Educational Development diploma. After graduating in 1954 from Apex Beauty School in Baltimore, Mrs. Jennings established Ilean's Beauty Salon in her Severna Park home.
NEWS
By Peter Hermann | May 16, 2012
A day after Baltimore County police set up a task force to target metal thieves who strip homes and businesses, tactical officers found themselves surrounding an abandoned state hospital building where two men were trying to steal copper pipes. Someone called about two suspicious men in an asbestos-laden building at Spring Grove State Hospital in Catonsville on Tuesday afternoon. The bystander saw the men carrying crow-bars and saws into the building, closed since 1974, according to Maryland State Police.
NEWS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | May 15, 2012
Two alleged copper thieves were arrested at Spring Grove Hospital Center on Tuesday, one after hiding for hours in the attic of an abandoned building on the Catonsville campus while police surrounded him. Dennis W. Dyer, 43, of the 8100 block of Mild Haven Road in Dundalk, climbed out of a porthole in the roof of the psychiatric hospital's Hamilton Building, which was closed and condemned in 1974, and handed himself over to state police troopers...
HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker, The Baltimore Sun | February 15, 2012
Workers at the Clifton T. Perkins Hospital Center in Jessup held a rally Wednesday to urge state lawmakers to add more jobs at the troubled mental facility where three patients were killed in a 14-month span. Gov. Martin O'Malley has included 93 additional jobs in his budget proposal, but workers and hospital leaders worry that that number might get pared down by nearly 30 as the state faces fiscal pressure. The workers, members of the American Federation of State and County Municipal Employees, rallied in front of the hospital waving green signs that said "Budget for Safety.
NEWS
By Arthur Hirsch, The Baltimore Sun | February 9, 2012
A man accused of beating one of his roommates to death at the Clifton T. Perkins Hospital Center last fall was found mentally competent Thursday to stand trial in Howard County Circuit Court. Vitali Davydov, 24, who is charged with first-degree murder in the death of 23-year-old David Rico-Noyola, appeared in court handcuffed, his hands covered with large padded white mittens. Bearded and wearing eyeglasses, Davydov spoke in slow, slightly slurred speech, telling Judge Lenore R. Gelfman that he waived his right to a speedy trial, and naming several medications he is now taking.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,Sun Staff Writer | May 3, 1994
More than 40 people questioned a state task force last night and urged its members not to close Springfield Hospital Center in Sykesville.The proposed consolidation of Springfield and two other state hospitals -- Crownsville and Spring Grove -- is a "political maneuver which began years ago with deinstitutionalization," said Janice Becker, an advocate for the mentally ill. Services have not keep pace with the policy, she added.Last month, the Task Force to Consider the Feasibility of Consolidation of State Hospitals Citizen Forum had to cancel its meeting for lack of space.
NEWS
By Thomas W. Waldron and Thomas W. Waldron,Evening Sun Staff | November 15, 1990
Gov. William Donald Schaefer today detailed $176 million in cost containment measures, the first round of budget cuts necessary to cope with a state deficit approaching $300 million.Most of the cost savings in the 1990-91 budget are coming through hiring freezes imposed several weeks ago, travel restrictions and relatively minor budget cutbacks. But some programs, particularly in the state health department, will be heavily cut.Schaefer was to present budget cuts to the state Board of Public Works for approval this afternoon.
NEWS
November 27, 2011
Investigators delving into the circumstances surrounding the deaths of two patients at the Clifton T. Perkins Hospital Center in Jessup last month are likely to find there are no quick fixes for the state's troubled maximum-security mental hospital. Staff morale has collapsed, a climate of fear has gripped the institution, and it may take the Perkins community years to recover a sense of normalcy. The fact that the victims were killed by two of their fellow patients has renewed concerns over safety that were raised by the 2010 killing of a mentally ill female patient under similar circumstances.
NEWS
November 24, 2011
Thank you for your coverage of the increasing violence at the Clifton T. Perkins state mental hospital ("Perkins patients tough to treat: Shift from hospital care mean many have prison experience," Nov. 21). I have been watching a similar set of cases in the California state mental hospital system and these may point to where Perkins is going unless it resolves its staffing issues quickly. In October 2010, nurse Donna Gross was murdered at Napa State Hospital. She had taken a patient outside the building to another unit when she was strangled.
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