Advertisement
HomeCollectionsState Health
IN THE NEWS

State Health

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | January 6, 2005
Dr. Michelle A. Gourdine, Baltimore County's top health official for nearly a decade, has been appointed deputy secretary of public health services for the state Department of Health and Mental Hygiene, according to state officials. The appointment by Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr. will take effect Feb. 1. Gourdine, a board-certified pediatrician, has served as the county's health officer since 1995 and oversees about 550 employees and a $44 million budget, county officials said. As deputy secretary, Gourdine, 42, will oversee seven areas of the state health agency, including those dealing with alcohol and drug abuse, AIDS and community health.
ARTICLES BY DATE
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn and The Baltimore Sun | September 26, 2014
The state's Mental Hygiene Administration didn't have adequate procedures to ensure consumers given care were eligible, according to audit by the Department of Legislative Services during fiscal 2013. The state funds in question totaled $16.4 million. The total budget that year was $788 million when federal funds were counted. The audit also found reviews weren't done in a timely manner by an accounting firm hired to monitor some of the agency's fiscal functions, with some reviews taking up to an extra 21 months.
Advertisement
NEWS
By Diana Sugg and Diana Sugg,SUN STAFF | October 19, 2001
In a sweeping plan released yesterday, state health officials outlined Maryland's top health problems and strategies to fix them. Children's health emerged as the No. 1 priority, followed by substance abuse, cancer and access to health care. Improving the public health infrastructure to deal with threats like bioterrorism also made the list of top 10 priorities. According to the plan, many public health workers around the state don't have access to the state health department's secure computer network to get timely, essential information, and data systems need to be integrated and updated.
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn and The Baltimore Sun | September 17, 2014
A day after Maryland committed to a gradual launch of its health exchange, state officials are still working out some key details — including where the opening day sign-up will be held — but experts say it could be a way to avoid a repeat of last year's botched rollout.  Several health experts said the approach that limits enrollment in the first few days could allow Maryland to "kick the tires" on its new website. "It's a controlled way to open enrollment," said Karen Pollitz, senior fellow at the Kaiser Family Foundation.
NEWS
By Sarah Fisher and Sarah Fisher,sarah.fisher@baltsun.com | July 2, 2009
A year into a new effort to expand health coverage, recession-weary Marylanders are flocking to the state's Medicaid program in numbers far greater than expected, costing the state $50 million more in the process. As of this week, 44,255 additional state residents had enrolled in Maryland's Medicaid system after income limits were significantly relaxed, outpacing projections that enrollment would increase by 26,605. Officials say the economic downturn has swelled the ranks of the unemployed, driving more people than expected into the public plan.
NEWS
By John W. Frece and John W. Frece,Annapolis Bureau of The Sun | September 29, 1991
ANNAPOLIS -- As a Republican candidate for governor last year, Dr. Ross Z. Pierpont needled Democratic Gov. William Donald Schaefer as a "big spender" who is too free with taxpayers' money and too eager to dole out jobs to political insiders.But Dr. Pierpont says those labels do not apply to his case, even though the Schaefer administration managed in these desperate economic times to set aside as much as $77,480 to hire the 74-year-old surgeon to help out at the state health department.Dr.
NEWS
By David Nitkin and David Nitkin,SUN STAFF | September 23, 2004
A veteran federal official who held department management posts in the Reagan and first Bush administrations was nominated by Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr. yesterday to replace departing state health secretary Nelson J. Sabatini. S. Anthony McCann, 61, would earn $155,000 a year as secretary of the Department of Health and Mental Hygiene, a job he is scheduled to start next month. The department manages more than $6 billion in state and federal funds, including nearly $4 billion for Medicaid programs, and is viewed as a probable source of spending cuts as Ehrlich seeks to balance the budget without new taxes.
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | August 3, 2000
Dr. Martin P. Wasserman, former state health secretary, has been appointed director of the health division of the Oregon Department of Human Services, officials announced yesterday. Wasserman, 58, is director of Maryland's Office to End Smoking at the Johns Hopkins School of Public Health. A physician and lawyer, he headed the state health department from 1995 to April 1999, overseeing the launching of the managed care program for the poor. Last year, he received the American Medical Association's Nathan Davis Award as state health official of the year.
NEWS
By Kate Smith and Frank D. Roylance, The Baltimore Sun | July 7, 2010
With Baltimore sweating through a second straight day of triple-digit temperatures, state officials ordered the Ravenwood Nursing and Rehabilitation Center to relocate all 150 patients because of problems with its air- conditioning system and began a comprehensive investigation of the facility. Throughout the day, residents in wheelchairs and on stretchers were loaded into vans and ambulances, as the West Franklin Street nursing home — where temperatures had climbed as high as 93 amid this week's heat wave — was gradually emptied.
NEWS
By Erika Niedowski and Erika Niedowski,SUN STAFF | January 7, 2005
Just as flu activity has begun to pick up in Maryland, state health officials are relaxing restrictions on those eligible to receive vaccine to prevent it. Following the lead of the nation's top public health agency, the state Department of Health and Mental Hygiene announced yesterday that everyone age 50 and older should be able to get a shot. Because of the nationwide vaccine shortage, vaccinations had been limited on a voluntary basis to those 64 and older, those with chronic illnesses, pregnant women, children younger than 2 and health care workers.
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | August 29, 2014
Maryland's health exchange reported Friday a decline in the number of people who were covered by private plans through the online insurance portal created by the Affordable Care Act. But the total number of people obtaining coverage through the exchange still grew to 433,947 because of people signing up for Medicaid. About 264 people canceled their private plans in the last month because of special circumstances and a total of 78,666 are now covered through those plans. The state exchange also lost Medicaid recipients who no longer qualified for the program, but gained more than it lost.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | August 13, 2014
Maryland officials approved $16 billion in contracts Wednesday that are intended to change the way state employees use health care by offering rewards for taking steps to stay well - and imposing penalties for refusing to comply. Rewards would come in the form of free doctor visits and procedures, while penalties for failing to follow medical advice could go as high as $375. Most coverage changes start in January. The contract award, believed to be the largest in Maryland history, is projected to save the state and its employees $4 billion over the next decade.
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn | August 11, 2014
State health officials are reminding parents to get their kids their vaccinations before school starts. Some of the requirements are new, and students can be kept out of the classroom if they do not have the proper shots. “We have spent the past year helping parents and schools prepare for these school immunization requirements,” said Dr. Laura Herrera, deputy secretary for the Department of Health and Mental Hygiene's Public Health Services. “We want to be sure all Maryland children start the school year with up-to-date vaccinations and are ready to learn.” Students entering kindergarten now must have had two chickenpox (varicella)
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | March 21, 2014
As the deadline approaches to sign up for health coverage under the Affordable Care Act, Maryland's exchange saw a bump on enrollment in private plans. In the week ending March 15, 4,143 people bought private plans through the exchange website, bringing the total to 44,836. Another 9,769 signed up for Medicaid, bringing that total to 107,550. Combined with adults automatically moved to Medicaid from a state program, a total of 248,230 have obtained new coverage that began this year.
HEALTH
By John Fritze, The Baltimore Sun | March 5, 2014
The U.S. Government Accountability Office said Wednesday it is planning to examine state-based health insurance exchanges created under the Affordable Care Act, a move that could lead to a review of Maryland's troubled website. In a letter to Republican lawmakers on Capitol Hill, the nonpartisan investigative arm of Congress wrote that it would pursue a review of Oregon's exchange and that the effort would be folded into "a broader study planned to examine states' health exchange websites.
HEALTH
By Erin Cox, The Baltimore Sun | February 10, 2014
Maryland's poorly performing health exchange will cost taxpayers $33 million more than expected this year, bringing the state's total annual expense to $138 million, officials said Monday. The money is needed, in part, to pay the company hired to help fix the dysfunctional web site and to triple the work force at the state's call center, which has been overwhelmed by requests for help from customers struggling to buy insurance online. Even with the extra spending, it isn't certain the exchange can be fixed - or is worth fixing - in time for the next enrollment period in the fall, officials said.
NEWS
By Dan Clements | December 2, 2013
As a trial lawyer for many years, and as an individual long involved with Planned Parenthood, I have always been deeply concerned about delivery of health care to the poor. Unfortunately, the leadership implementing the Affordable Care Act in Maryland missed the mark by a long shot, leaving Maryland's 800,000 uninsured in the lurch. While there will no doubt be finger pointing as the public continues to learn about the state's botched rollout, there can also be no doubt about who was responsible for leading the effort.
NEWS
By ANDREW A. GREEN AND JOHN FRITZE and ANDREW A. GREEN AND JOHN FRITZE,SUN REPORTERS | July 18, 2006
The top Maryland gubernatorial candidates focused on improving the state's health care system yesterday, with Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr. announcing a new program to expand access for the working poor and Baltimore Mayor Martin O'Malley unveiling a plan to attract and retain nurses. Speaking at a health clinic in Park Heights, Ehrlich announced the start of a program that will allow about 22,000 more low- to moderate-income Marylanders to get free primary health care with little additional investment from the state.
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | February 7, 2014
Rebecca Pearce, who resigned under pressure in December as the director of the state's troubled health insurance exchange, was given five wage increases during her nearly 27-month tenure — including one scheduled raise after she stepped down, according to emails and letters provided by the exchange. Pearce's salary when she departed was $199,511, or $24,511 more than when she was hired. After a career in the insurance industry, Pearce was appointed in September 2011 to oversee the agency in charge of developing and running the state's online marketplace.
NEWS
February 3, 2014
The death this weekend of acclaimed actor Philip Seymour Hoffman from an apparent drug overdose has left his fans and colleagues in the film industry devastated by the loss of a great talent at so young an age. Mr. Hoffman was 46 when he was found dead in his New York apartment Sunday with a hypodermic needle stuck in his arm and packets of what appeared to be heroin nearby. His tragedy was a reminder that heroin addiction has many faces, from the rich and famous to people of severely limited means.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.