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NEWS
May 20, 2012
Recently I spent 90 minutes on the metal benches at the DMV in Glen Burnie waiting to renew my driver's license on a day a lot of my fellow Marylanders had the same idea. While waiting - especially without a book to read - can be difficult, I left with a smile on my face. The DMV employees I dealt with - getting my number, answering questions and finally getting my license - could not have been more pleasant, helpful or friendly. Bravo Maryland state employees! Want a shorter wait?
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NEWS
By Carrie Wells, The Baltimore Sun | July 12, 2014
Morgan State University's Board of Regents violated the state open meetings law when it did not give proper notice of a hastily convened executive committee meeting, the Open Meetings Compliance Board found this week. The executive committee, which met on Friday, May 2, posted notice of its meeting to the college's website just one day before. The attorney for the regents said the meeting needed to be called quickly and that it took a few days to settle on a place and time. The Open Meetings Compliance Board, which issued its ruling on Thursday, found that was not reasonable advance notice.
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NEWS
April 16, 1992
When the General Assembly's extended legislative session ended last week, one group had achieved exactly what taxpayers desired. The Commission on Efficiency and Economy in Government took its first steps to curb waste and make state government more self-supporting.Among the group's successes: passage of a mandatory helmet law for motorcyclists (savings to the state, at least $1.3 million a year); elimination of funds for the resident trooper program for Carroll County and rural counties (savings, $1 million a year)
NEWS
March 3, 2014
Back in 1970 when Maryland was just entering what might be described as its golden age of political corruption, the General Assembly passed a law to make it easier for people to obtain government records. The Public Information Act was seen as a way to help hold all state agencies - executive, legislative and judicial - more accountable to the citizens. The PIA has been a huge success. Every day it is used by someone somewhere to peruse the fine print of a disputed contract, find out how taxpayer dollars are spent, discover what senior officials are saying to each other (or to those in private industry they are supposed to be regulating)
NEWS
By Roland E. English III | December 14, 2004
GOOD GOVERNMENT is balanced government. Branches of government, various levels of government and all of their laws, budgets, policies, plans, programs and administrative units can work only when they are balanced to achieve the collective good of the people. The would-be deal in which Baltimore contractor and philanthropist Willard Hackerman proposed to buy 836 acres of preservation land from the state in St. Mary's County has become a lightning rod for criticism and explanation. Simply put, what concerns other Marylanders and me about the proposed purchase is that it failed the balancing test of good government.
NEWS
By JAMES B. MOORHEAD | February 7, 1993
Last Sunday's Super Bowl wasn't decided entirely by the players on the field. Or even by the coaches on the sidelines. Instead, it's likely some of the Cowboys' success was due to unseen Dallas coaches peering through binoculars who were perched high above the field, able to see the entire field and the set-up of both teams. Throughout the game, they talked by phone to the sideline coaches and key players, making formation adjustments and recommending plays.Recently a group of citizens, myself included, got a chance to play a similar role for the state of Maryland.
NEWS
By Marta Hummel Mossburg | September 8, 2009
To listen to Maryland House Speaker Michael Busch, the state is starving. "You're down to bone and gristle now when it comes to state government," the Democrat recently said in response to the $454 million cut from the current budget last month by the Board of Public Works. The state has burned $736 million worth of flab from the $14 billion 2010 operating budget in the past two months. But the trims do not imperil big government in Maryland. And they resemble a series of bulimic purges more than any systemic dietary changes - meaning more rounds of cuts will be necessary to balance the budget in coming years.
NEWS
March 15, 2012
Did the editors of The Sun ever meet a tax increase they didn't like ("Pay now or later," March 14)? If the taxes that are collected for transportation were spent on transportation, there would be plenty of funds for transportation and no need for a gas tax increase. Instead, this fund has been repeatedly looted to support the ever-increasing state government. Unfortunately, with the Democrats' stranglehold on state government, we will pay now and pay later. The solution is obvious - except to Gov.Martin O'Malley and The Sun - reduce spending.
NEWS
By [JENNIFER SKALKA] and [JENNIFER SKALKA],Sun Reporter | May 16, 2007
Gov.Martin O'Malley signed an executive order yesterday stating that state employment decisions will be based solely on merit and fitness, and reinforcing an anti-discrimination policy for hiring and personnel activity. The order also mandates that the secretary of budget and management appoint a statewide equal opportunity coordinator to ensure that Maryland is complying with state and federal employment laws. "To bring the best workers to Maryland?s state government we need to guarantee every employee the basic protections that they deserve, and that our state government sets an example for equal employment opportunities throughout Maryland," the governor said in a statement.
NEWS
By Pamela Wood, The Baltimore Sun | January 11, 2014
The 2014 General Assembly session got underway Wednesday, turning Annapolis into the state's center of debate, protest, legislation and proclamation for the next 90 days. Legislators from Anne Arundel County are promoting bills that range from rolling back stormwater fees to legalizing refillable containers of wine. Local lawmakers also will take another crack at changing the makeup of the Anne Arundel school board - a seemingly perennial issue for the county delegation. On that front, the bill being considered is identical to one proposed last year to create a school board with seven elected members, three members appointed by the governor and one student member, said Del. Steve Schuh, a Gibson Island Republican who is chairman of the county's House delegation.
NEWS
Dan Rodricks | December 12, 2013
A couple of weeks ago, before he went on a nine-day trip to Brazil and El Salvador, Gov. Martin O'Malley pledged that major glitches in Maryland's health insurance exchange would be fixed by mid-December. Well, the governor has returned from the Southern Hemisphere, and guess what? Mid-December is Sunday at noon. So I guess we'll see if our totally excellent governor will be able to deliver a fix like the one the Obama administration appears to have pulled off at the federal level.
NEWS
April 25, 2013
The Sun's Scott Dance recently reported on the salvaging of baseball fields at the shuttered Cardinal Gibbons school ("$1.4 million raised for baseball field at site of Cardinal Gibbons School," April 20). He reported money was raised by the Cal Ripken Foundation and other donors. Last week, State Comptroller Peter Franchot asked for the resignation of Towson University President Maravane Loeshke for the school's failure to manage their budget allowing for the insolvency of their sport's teams including baseball.
NEWS
February 22, 2013
I am writing to inform you of my feelings toward the proposed assault weapon legislation (SB Bill 281 and HB 294.) I must advise you that I have never felt more threatened or terrorized by my state government than I do right now. I am a law-abiding, tax-paying citizen of the state of Maryland, and I cannot believe the amount of gull and anti-intellectual thought that must have gone into writing these bills. The people who wrote these bills have absolutely no fundamental understanding of our God-given rights laid out in the United States Constitution.
NEWS
August 29, 2012
In its latest siren concerning public pension plans ("Beware the next federal bailout," Aug. 22), the Maryland Public Policy Institute (MPPI) relies on confusion and unjustified fear when it asks if there is another federal bailout coming. There is a simple answer: No. To support his conjecture, MPPI president Christopher Summers states that Maryland "does not have the money to pay for 60 percent of its actual pension liabilities. " Again, wrong, as Mr. Summers calculates these liabilities using economic assumptions and financial theory that comport with neither historical experience nor recognized accounting standards.
NEWS
by Michael Dresser | June 28, 2012
Bruce Myers, Maryland's watchdog-in-chief, will wind up a 30-year career in state government Friday when he retires as director of the Office of Legislative Audits. Myers, a quiet-spoken and circumspect auditor, is known as a dogged investigator of waste and on occasion corruption in state government. The reports produced by his office, which he has headed for 15 years, can be dry and routine but sometimes they uncover wrongdoing that makes front-page news. Last year his office's findings of a cozy relationship between contractors and the State Highway Administration led to the departure of the agency's administrator and the firing of several lower-level officials.
NEWS
May 20, 2012
Recently I spent 90 minutes on the metal benches at the DMV in Glen Burnie waiting to renew my driver's license on a day a lot of my fellow Marylanders had the same idea. While waiting - especially without a book to read - can be difficult, I left with a smile on my face. The DMV employees I dealt with - getting my number, answering questions and finally getting my license - could not have been more pleasant, helpful or friendly. Bravo Maryland state employees! Want a shorter wait?
NEWS
May 11, 2012
Be proud, Marylanders. After a 90-day session, our one-party state government could not agree on a budget. Now, after meeting in secret, Gov.Martin O'Malley, Senate President Thomas V. Mike Miller, and House SpeakerMichael E. Buschannounce that they have an agreement to raise taxes. The Sun agrees that this is a "fairer solution" ("A balanced solution," May 10). I question how any arrangement can be fair that is agreed upon out of the public eye. M. Link, Baltimore
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