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NEWS
January 3, 2010
As a parent of two developmentally disabled sons, I wanted to respond to the editorial "A true need," Dec. 27. I think it's about time that someone highlighted the needs of this important population. The funding for services is inadequate at best and needs to be fixed. These folks could live full, productive lives if the services were there for them. My sons depend on the dedicated service providers who help support them both in school and at work. When the services they receive are cut and they lose the consistency of the coaches they like, it's hard.
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NEWS
By William E. Kirwan | June 28, 2014
As I look back over my 12 years as chancellor of the University System of Maryland (USM), one of the developments in which I take the most pride has been the USM's genuine partnership with state leaders in Annapolis. Now that the primary is over and the election looms, I encourage candidates for office across Maryland, especially those running for governor, to commit themselves to upholding this partnership. It has served our students, the state and the citizens exceptionally well.
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NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | February 4, 2013
Hundreds of students and supporters of Maryland's historically black colleges and universities rallied Monday in Annapolis to press for increased state funding to make up for decades of discrimination. The presidents of Morgan State University, Coppin State University, Bowie State University and the University of Maryland Eastern Shore joined civil rights leaders and several politicians in front of the State House to call on Gov. Martin O'Malley to settle a lawsuit alleging the schools have been underfunded at least since the 1930s.
NEWS
May 29, 2014
What a revelation. Former Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr. cares deeply about higher education. And, all of a sudden, he's an expert on the subject ( "College: where kids become leftists," May 25). For anyone who doesn't remember, tuition at Maryland's public colleges and universities increased by 40 percent during his four years in office. His deep cuts to state funding led directly to those increases and reflected a view that students should pay more of the cost. His new found concern about affordability and debt burden is truly a wonder to behold.
NEWS
By GINA DAVIS and GINA DAVIS,SUN REPORTER | April 27, 2006
Just days after news that Carroll County schools would lose $2 million in state funding for school construction projects, local officials announced yesterday that the system would receive the money. "The quote I have [from state officials] is that `The funding is not in jeopardy,'" Del. Susan W. Krebs, who represents South Carroll, said during a joint meeting of the school board and the county commissioners. "I'm confident we're going to have the $2 million. It's well-deserved." Last week, legislative budget analysts said that a state property tax cut supported by Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr. and approved by the Board of Public Works would delay $16 million in school construction projects across the state.
NEWS
By Brenda J. Buote and Brenda J. Buote,SUN STAFF | December 11, 1998
The county will apply for additional state funding to continue preservation efforts in the Little Pipe Creek watershed, a 35,000-acre area on Carroll's western edge.The county commissioners approved yesterday a request by Philip J. Rovang, county planning director, to draft an application seeking funding through the state's Rural Legacy program. County officials have not determined how much Carroll would seek.The $29 million program, part of Gov. Parris N. Glendening's Smart Growth initiative, was created to protect land that might not qualify for other preservation programs.
NEWS
By Kerry O'Rourke and Kerry O'Rourke,Sun Staff Writer | April 14, 1994
Carroll Community College officials said yesterday they will not raise tuition next year because the school has received almost $900,000 in additional state money.The General Assembly last week approved a budget for community colleges in Maryland that included an extra $3.9 million for nine schools.Of that amount, Carroll received the largest chunk -- about $890,000, said Fred W. Puddester, deputy secretary of the state Department of Budget and Fiscal Planning.The extra money means the college won't raise its tuition of $48 per credit hour and will not ask the county for more money for fiscal year 1995, said Vice President of Administration Alan M. Schuman.
NEWS
By Glenn McNatt | March 9, 1997
THE REPUBLICAN caucus of the Maryland General Assembly has proposed cutting state funding for the arts nearly in half for 1997. If enacted, the cuts would devastate local arts groups, forcing them to cancel performances, slash outreach programs, lower artistic standards and double or even triple ticket prices.The total savings from such a wholesale gutting of the arts would amount to about $3 million, or less than one-twentieth of 1 percent of the overall state budget. By such means does the GOP promise to bring economic growth and prosperity to Maryland.
NEWS
February 27, 1998
STARNER'S DAM. Melrose. Smallwood. Know where they are in Carroll County? If the county commissioners approve, these places would soon achieve the status of official "rural villages."The county Planning and Zoning Commission has approved listings of 35 such places -- many you've never heard of -- for designation as villages with defined geographic boundaries.With eight established municipalities, Carroll is the leader in the region in incorporated towns. Now the list would grow to nearly blanket the county with villages.
NEWS
April 7, 2000
SYKESVILLE gets it all: all the money it has spent planning redevelopment of the 138-acre Warfield Complex the town is acquiring; all the boost of a $25-million-plus state police training facility as anchor for those former Springfield mental hospital grounds. State funding gives the town a running start toward making the annexed property a viable addition to the community. Instead of office buildings, apartment houses, a hotel and high-tech firms once planned for the complex, the property will see nonprofits and public agencies as its first tenants.
NEWS
By Carrie Wells, The Baltimore Sun | May 14, 2014
The University of Baltimore on Wednesday named former mayor Kurt L. Schmoke its next president, marking the return of a pivotal figure in the city's political history and someone boosters hope will strengthen the institution and its neighborhood. Schmoke, who has held several roles at Howard University, including law school dean, said he hoped to "build on the momentum" of Robert L. Bogomolny, who announced last fall he would retire as president at the end of the academic year. Schmoke will take over the job in July.
NEWS
Letter to The Aegis | May 1, 2014
After reviewing your budget in brief and associated comments, I find myself once again obliged to respond. You cite several statistics to justify your lack of commitment to our public schools. You state that Harford County ranked 13th in local funding to public education. This is true but Harford County also ranked 12th in wealth per pupil. Citing these rankings as justification for your administration's perpetual under funding of our schools highlights your fundamental disregard or misunderstanding of the state formula for school funding.
NEWS
By Helaine Zinaman and Nancy Green | March 17, 2014
Life for high-ability and high-potential students in Maryland and the nation may be getting just a little bit brighter. After years of being silent on the issue, the state now requires that local school districts identify and serve gifted students, joining 27 states that require such actions. Unfortunately, Maryland does not provide any state funding to districts specifically to support this work, which means we may not have raised the floor for these students in some of the state's less well-off counties.
NEWS
Editorial from the Aegis | February 4, 2014
Responding to a proposal set forth in Gov. Martin O'Malley's recent State of the State Address calling for full day pre-kindergarten being offered across Maryland, Harford County interim Superintendent Barbara Canavan offered conditional support for the idea. "Children can do so much more. We need to expose them and give them the opportunity to learn, and the earlier the better," Canavan was quoted as telling the Harford County delegation to the Maryland General Assembly. She then went on to highlight an important aspect of the program that could be all too easy to ignore.
NEWS
January 19, 2014
Judge Alfred Nance's recent order requiring the assistance of legal counsel to defendants at pre-trial hearings hopefully will serve as a wake-up call for Maryland's criminal justice system ( "Court order could push state to send lawyers to bail hearings," Jan. 15). Plaintiffs' attorney Michael Schatzhow called it correctly when he asserts that the courts, local and state funding entities and the entire legal community need to look ahead at what's around the corner. The issue of re-expanding rights to representation has been bubbling up for the past year or two in Maryland.
NEWS
Tim Wheeler and Michael Dresser | January 14, 2014
Baltimore County Executive Kevin Kamenetz joined his counterparts from Montgomery and Prince George's counties in Annapolis Tuesday to appeal for more state funding for school construction, saying they need help coping with rising enrollments. Speaking for all three, Kamenetz warned that whatever success Maryland has had in providing quality education to the state's students is in jeopardy unless the state's most populous counties can expand and upgrade their aging, crowded schools.
NEWS
By Alison Knezevich, The Baltimore Sun | July 1, 2013
Baltimore County officials say three local communities will be eligible for state funding for projects to improve their economies, housing, transportation and the environment based on their designation by the state as sustainable communities. Hillendale/Parkville/Overlea, Catonsville/Patapsco and Greater Dundalk were named "sustainable communities" by the state Department of Housing and Community Development and the state Department of Planning. The county picked the areas for consideration because of the potential for revitalization, and the county planning department worked with the communities to draw up strategies to encourage local investment.
NEWS
By Alec MacGillis and Alec MacGillis,SUN STAFF | November 21, 2003
COLLEGE PARK - Maryland's higher-education leaders told a special legislative committee last night that the only way they can moderate the rise in college costs is if lawmakers again start providing reliable increases in state funding. "The way to bring tuition increases under control is to have a balanced investment where the state pays its share and students pay their share," said University System of Maryland Chancellor William E. Kirwan at the hearing on the University of Maryland campus here.
BUSINESS
By Natalie Sherman | December 17, 2013
A 15-story hotel in the East Baltimore development just north of the Johns Hopkins medical campus is expected to receive $1.35 million in state money for pre-development work. The Board of Estimates will meet Wednesday about the grant, which includes $1.1 million for architecture. The total cost for design and predevelopment work for the 1800 East Madison St. building is estimated to be $4.51 million. Edward Scott of UrbanAmerica Advisors, which is working on the Gateway Hotel project, did not respond to requests for comment.
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