Advertisement
HomeCollectionsState Ethics
IN THE NEWS

State Ethics

NEWS
By Larry Carson and Larry Carson,SUN STAFF | February 6, 2004
Robert J. Antonetti Sr., the Howard County elections administrator who defied a state Court of Appeals order to pay an ethics fine incurred during his tenure in Prince George's County and sued the county elections board last year for more pay, has settled the case and agreed to retire March 31 -- four weeks after Maryland's presidential primary. His departure will end a tumultuous 3 1/2 -year term marked by legal wrangling over his refusal to pay an ethics fine, the fatal heart attack of the county board chairman during a close 2002 vote recount, and the first use of the electronic voting technology that Antonetti publicly doubted could be ready on time.
Advertisement
NEWS
By Walter F. Roche Jr. and Walter F. Roche Jr.,SUN STAFF | December 14, 1999
The task force examining the state Injured Workers Insurance Fund recommended yesterday that the agency's governing board be expanded, and members hinted they'll abandon a proposal to exempt the agency from state ethics and public meetings laws.The task force voted unanimously during a two-hour session to recommend that IWIF's board of directors expand from seven to 11 members to better manage the $1 billion operation. They rejected proposals to require that some of those board members have expertise in a particular field, such as insurance.
NEWS
By Tim Craig and Tim Craig,SUN STAFF | May 15, 2003
Maryland ranks high among states for the quality of its disclosure regulations for lobbyists but still gets a poor overall grade because the information needs to be more accessible to the public, according to a government watchdog organization based in Washington. The Center for Public Integrity gave Maryland a "D" for efforts to regulate lobbyists and make their activities available for public viewing. The state's sub-par grade was still better than those of 41 other states, highlighting the low priority of lobbying reform in most state legislatures.
NEWS
By Thomas W. Waldron and Thomas W. Waldron,SUN STAFF | March 12, 1998
Responding to ethics controversies that have dominated the legislative session, House Speaker Casper R. Taylor Jr. proposed yesterday that the General Assembly create a new ethics office to help police the behavior of its members.The Office of Legislative Ethics Advisory Services -- with a full-time director and support staff -- would work with the Assembly's ethics committee and subject the 188 senators and delegates to what would amount to regular ethics checkups.Taylor said he was less concerned with catching and punishing lawmakers who break the law than with helping all legislators comply.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser and Lynn Anderson and Michael Dresser and Lynn Anderson,SUN STAFF | January 21, 2005
A veteran Annapolis lawyer and lobbyist was sentenced to five years of probation and 1,000 hours of community service yesterday in a California federal court for his role in defrauding a nonprofit mental health care clinic. Ira C. Cooke, 58, whose clients have included gambling interests and bail bond companies, was convicted last month on charges of theft, commercial bribery and conspiracy. As a result, his registration as a lobbyist could be revoked by the State Ethics Commission, and he could be disbarred.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser and Michael Dresser,SUN STAFF | June 15, 2002
The state Department of Human Resources said yesterday that Annapolis lobbyist Bruce C. Bereano met with its officials on behalf of the winning bidder on a disputed $42 million contract even though he is not registered to represent the organization. Elyn Garrett-Jones, a spokesman for the Department of Human Resources, said that Bereano conducted two meetings in April with department procurement officials concerning details of the lucrative foster care contract that had been awarded to the nonprofit Adoptions Together.
NEWS
By Greg Garland and Greg Garland,SUN STAFF | May 18, 2005
A top Maryland transportation official inappropriately oversaw $3.3 million in poorly documented consulting work done for the state by a company that employs her husband, according to an audit report released yesterday. The auditors, who turned their findings over to law enforcement authorities for review, said the official's actions appear to violate state ethics law and internal policies of the Maryland Department of Transportation governing conflicts of interest. Auditors did not name the "senior management official" in their report, but a source familiar with the investigation identified her as Marsha J. Kaiser, director of the office of planning and capital programming for the Transportation Department.
NEWS
By Tom Pelton and Tom Pelton,SUN STAFF | December 4, 1997
Under pressure from the state, Anne Arundel County is moving to strengthen its ethics laws so that elected officials undergo reviews intended to prevent conflicts of interest.The County Council will hold a hearing Dec. 15 on an ordinance that would end the "self-enforcing" of county ethics laws by council members and the county executive.Under the proposed law, elected officials who wanted to take a vote or an action in which they had a personal financial interest would first have to submit a written explanation to the county Ethics Commission for a ruling.
NEWS
By Steven Stanek and Steven Stanek,Sun reporter | July 23, 2008
County Executive John R. Leopold has asked the Anne Arundel County Ethics Commission to issue a special exemption allowing off-duty police officers to work second jobs at bingo halls and other establishments that serve alcohol, a stance the commission has long opposed. The request came Friday, the same day that the Maryland Ethics Commission said that a county bill allowing police officers to moonlight at such establishments was invalid because it does not conform to the state's ethics law. The state ruled that permission could be granted only through a special exemption granted by the county ethics commission, which has argued in the past that police officers who work secondary jobs in alcohol-serving establishments may be tempted to overlook minor illegal activity there.
NEWS
By Walter F. Roche Jr. and Scott Higham and Walter F. Roche Jr. and Scott Higham,SUN STAFF | January 15, 1998
Lawyers for embattled state Sen. Larry Young mounted a last-minute, but apparently futile, appeal yesterday to delay tomorrow's vote on a resolution to expel him from the Senate.In a letter to Senate President Thomas V. Mike Miller, Young's lawyers charged that the West Baltimore legislator was not given a chance to confront or cross-examine the witnesses whotestified against him, as allowed under the state ethics law.Instead, said Young's attorney Gregg L. Bernstein, the legislature's ethics committee used an abbreviated process to meet a preimposed deadline.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.