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NEWS
June 3, 2011
Regarding "Coaches, doctors get top state pay" (May 24), I am concerned by the database included with your article. It is extremely regrettable that The Sun made available the full names of state workers across the board. While this information is public, that does not mean it needs to be, or should be, published in the newspaper. The Sun has put correctional officers, parole and probation agents, police officers, juvenile service employees and state security officers at risk.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Luke Broadwater and The Baltimore Sun | September 15, 2014
About 200 Maryland Department of the Environment employees on one floor out of the four the agency occupies at its Baltimore headquarters were granted administrative leave Monday as officials dealt with an infestation problem. State officials found bed bugs in the office, located in the Montgomery Park Business Center in southwest Baltimore, in late August. The agency hired an exterminator who performed an inspection of the infested floor Monday. Other parts of the agency remain open, officials said.
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NEWS
May 26, 2011
I am writing in regards to the article you posted on salaries of state workers ("Coaches, doctors get top state pay" May 24). The problem with this is I am a state employee who puts my life on the line each and every day that I go to work, and I do not feel as though my full name and date of hire should be posted. I work short staffed everyday and in some very rough conditions that no one else would want to do. I am a correctional officer of 16 years in Jessup, and my job is to protect the public, the detainees, the employees and offenders housed behind the fences and walls that the average person has no knowledge of. My salary of $50,000 is hardly enough when you look at the type of work I do and the risk I take to do it. I am at risk of contracting AIDS, TB, head lice, MERSA, other childhood diseases as well, meningitis, hepatitis, tuberculosis, and melanoma and cancer.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | August 13, 2014
Maryland officials approved $16 billion in contracts Wednesday that are intended to change the way state employees use health care by offering rewards for taking steps to stay well - and imposing penalties for refusing to comply. Rewards would come in the form of free doctor visits and procedures, while penalties for failing to follow medical advice could go as high as $375. Most coverage changes start in January. The contract award, believed to be the largest in Maryland history, is projected to save the state and its employees $4 billion over the next decade.
NEWS
March 29, 2011
How blithely you brush over what is essentially an income tax on only state and education employees. It seems that the pension system, supposedly in such desperate straits, can manage without the increased contributions required from state employees for two years; instead they will go into the general fund. This is an income tax and has nothing to do with the pensions of the people being forced to pay it. It places an additional burden on people who have had years of furloughs and cannot remember their last raise.
NEWS
By Thomas W. Waldron and Laura Lippman and Thomas W. Waldron and Laura Lippman,Evening Sun Staff | December 17, 1990
Siegfried Wolff, a bond-program coordinator in the Maryland Department of Health and Mental Hygiene says being a state employee these days is much like being a prisoner condemned to death in revolutionary France."
NEWS
January 23, 2009
Having been involved in layoffs several times, I understand the anxiety and financial pain that go with the layoff notices the governor may be sending hundreds of state employees ("Painful cuts for budget balance," Jan. 22). But I worked for the private sector, and the layoffs were the result of downturns in the business of the company I worked for. There is no such downturn in the business of the state of Maryland. In fact, during times of recession, more is demanded from government services.
NEWS
By C. FRASER SMITH | December 7, 2008
Gov. Martin O'Malley's decision to furlough most of the state's work force was surely not the happiest moment of his tenure. But in a slack economy, it was probably a necessity - and it might have an upside for him politically. Faced with a widening pothole in the state's operating budget - and a statewide aversion to increasing taxes - Mr. O'Malley's budget-balancing options are limited. Thus, he plans to ask 67,000 state employees to take some days off, unpaid. The numbers had "significant" and "major" and "painful" stamped all over them.
NEWS
By Michael K. Burns | April 24, 1991
Another labor union has jumped into the ring to organize Maryland state workers, prompting a cry of foul by one competing union and renewing calls from labor officials for a collective bargaining law to resolve the confusion.The new union, sponsored by the American Federation of Teachers, is aimed at organizing some 6,000 state correctional workers, and opens the door for raiding members of three other state employee unions.Heading the organizing drive for the new Maryland Correctional Employees Union (MCU)
NEWS
By John W. Frece and John W. Frece,Annapolis Bureau of The Sun | July 7, 1991
ANNAPOLIS -- State employees derisively call it "Schaefer time," the extra 4 1/2 hours a week two-thirds of them will have to begin working without extra pay starting Wednesday.Demoralized by the absence of a pay raise this year, a cut in the state's health insurance subsidy and now this, many of them say they may "put in" the extra hours Gov. William Donald Schaefer has ordered, but they may not work them."It'll be like a work stoppage -- 10 minutes to answer the phone. It takes longer when you're on 'Schaefer time,' " said Connie Powell, an angry State Highway Administration employee.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | July 31, 2014
John W. Dorsey, former chancellor of the University of Maryland, Baltimore County who later returned to the classroom where he taught economics, died Monday of respiratory failure at his Laurel home. He was 78. "Many believe that he saved UMBC from several alternative fates, from absorption to closure, and set it onto the sound course that leads to today," said Joseph N. Tatarewicz, an associate professor of history at UMBC and director of the university's human context of science and technology program.
FEATURES
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | July 22, 2014
In a reversal of state healthcare policy, transgender state employees in Maryland can now access gender reassignment surgery, hormone therapy and other transition-related care under their state-provided health insurance plans. The change quietly went into effect at the start of this month as the result of legal negotiations in a discrimination case brought against the state by Sailor Holobaugh, a 31-year-old clinical research assistant in neurology at the University of Maryland School of Medicine in Baltimore.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | March 30, 2014
Josephine Atwater, a retired state Department of Human Resources employee who was a founding member of the Renaissance Institute at Notre Dame of Maryland University, died of cancer Thursday at her Halethorpe home. She was 89. Born Josephine Louise McNulty in Baltimore, she was the daughter of Thomas Aloysius McNulty, an Army Corps of Engineers employee, and Catherine Louise Gempp McNulty, who worked at American Can Co. Raised on Poplar Grove Street, she was a 1942 graduate of the Institute of Notre Dame and earned a bachelor of arts degree at Notre Dame of Maryland University after attending Mount St. Agnes Junior College.
NEWS
February 7, 2014
Regarding your recent editorial on plans to divert state employees' pension savings to the state's general fund, The Sun is, as usual, a little late to the party in criticizing Gov. Martin O'Malley for actions "potentially harmful to Maryland's fiscal health" ( "Broken promises," Feb. 4). Where have you been the last six years? Thomas F. McDonough, Towson - To respond to this letter, send an email to talkback@baltimoresun.com . Please include your name and contact information.
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | February 7, 2014
Rebecca Pearce, who resigned under pressure in December as the director of the state's troubled health insurance exchange, was given five wage increases during her nearly 27-month tenure — including one scheduled raise after she stepped down, according to emails and letters provided by the exchange. Pearce's salary when she departed was $199,511, or $24,511 more than when she was hired. After a career in the insurance industry, Pearce was appointed in September 2011 to oversee the agency in charge of developing and running the state's online marketplace.
NEWS
February 5, 2014
In your report on Lt. Gov. Anthony Brown's hosting campaign contributors in the state's skybox at the Washington Redskins' stadium, I got the impression that this was real news when in fact it's not. In the past The Sun has reported that former Mayor Sheila ("I'll take my pension and run") Dixon, current Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake and Gov. Martin O'Malley also have used state skyboxes to grease the palms of their political supporters ("Brown's skybox guests and their affiliates donated $20K to campaign," Feb. 1)
NEWS
By Jon Morgan and Jon Morgan,Evening Sun Staff | February 7, 1991
Despite receiving a temporary reprieve from the governor, state employees could still find themselves working longer hours and facing layoffs on short notice in coming months as officials seek to contain a growing budget crisis.Gov. William Donald Schaefer temporarily rescinded yesterday a month-old executive order for thousands of state workers to put in 40-hour weeks instead of the current 35 1/2 .He said he would suspend the order until July 1 and issue a new one calling for newly hired state workers to be scheduled for 40-hour workweeks effective immediately.
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | November 5, 2004
A petition signed by hundreds of state workers complaining about proposed increases to their health insurance costs was delivered to state budget officials yesterday as a small group of employees huddled in the rain to protest the planned charges. "They want to balance the budget on our shoulders," said David Harding, a computer operator in the Department of Health and Mental Hygiene and a leader of a union that represents some of the state's nearly 100,000 employees and retirees. "It's gone too far."
NEWS
January 24, 2014
Thank you for the thoughtful editorial on the Supreme Court case of Harris v. Quinn ("Paying one's dues," Jan. 23). While it may seem reasonable to force people to pay union dues in order to engage in commerce, it might be more reasonable to consider the possibility that people should be free to engage in commerce on their own terms. Why did Illinois decide to treat these people as employees in the first place? After all, the doctors who receive Medicare funds are not state employees.
BUSINESS
By John Fritze, The Baltimore Sun | January 16, 2014
Not long ago state officials in Maryland faced a technology roadblock that anyone who works at a private company would find quaint: There was no easy way to blast an email to the entire workforce. For an administration led by an early BlackBerry addict, the inability to quickly send government-wide emails in an emergency - or even to invite state employees to the executive mansion for the annual open house - was an odd holdover from an era before camera phones and touch screens. Now, roughly 54,000 state employees are switching to a cloud-based email and scheduling system provided by tech giant Google - making Maryland the largest state in the nation to rely on the ubiquitous search engine firm for email, calendars and document sharing.
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