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State Dinner

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NEWS
November 22, 1997
THE TRUE SCANDAL in the Clinton White House, to hear some tell, is the antediluvian format of guest lists at state dinners. One line describes the accomplishment or reason-for-being-there of the invited guest, and none -- zilch, nada -- about the escort, the person on that person's arm. Just imagine!So, at the state dinner for President Jiang Zemin of China, Peter A. Kann was identified as chairman of Dow Jones and the Wall Street Journal but Karen Elliott House, the person with him, was left undescribed.
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FEATURES
By Jill Rosen and The Baltimore Sun | May 11, 2012
Baltimore's own Stacy Keibler was front and center Thursday night for her boyfriend George Clooney's record-breaking fundraising fete for President Obama. She may have missed being at Clooney's side for the recent White House Correspondent's dinner. And she may have missed that state dinner that he attended a few months ago. But, ending speculation (at least for the moment) that the two of them are on the rocks, she wasn't going to miss this. Guests paid $40,000 each to be there.
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NEWS
By Ellen Gamerman and Ellen Gamerman,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | September 4, 2001
WASHINGTON - Before the silverware is polished, the menu chosen and the flowers arranged, each White House marks its first state dinner with tradition of a different sort: a summit over the guest list. When President and Laura Bush hold their first state dinner tomorrow, no one will be sitting there by accident - considering that teams adept in all matters political, diplomatic and social have agonized for weeks over the invitations. The event, a banquet in honor of President Vicente Fox of Mexico, features a guest list designed with precision - an evening plotted like a military action, but with cleavage and cocktails.
NEWS
By Jules Witcover | December 1, 2009
Americans love a good hoax. That's why the outlandish stunt by those uninvited guests at the latest White House state dinner has amused as well as perplexed viewers rushing to network and cable news and the Internet for more details. Along with all the chuckles over the audacity of it have come solemn concerns about what might have happened had the publicity-questing couple turned out to be closet disciples of Osama bin Laden or some other imaginative terrorist leader. The Secret Service, commissioned to insulate and protect the president, has a big, fat order of egg on its face.
NEWS
February 3, 1993
Those who thought Hillary Rodham Clinton was too much of a feminist and professional to stand the famous heat in the White House kitchen now know better.In addition to being in charge of the health care task force and also serving as adviser on policy and personnel for the administration, she has announced that she will be running the household at 1600 Pennsylvania Avenue. She may not personally rattle any pots and pans, but, like a few First Ladies before her, she is going to put her stamp on the cuisine.
NEWS
October 18, 1994
FORGET about "Hon man." Pretty soon, they'll have to change the sign up on the parkway to "Welcome to Baltimore. . . Howdy." That is, if this town gets any more country.Our congratulations to WPOC disc jockey Laurie DeYoung, who was honored as the "large market radio personality of the year" at this month's Country Music Association Awards in Nashville. It is thought to be the first time a woman who performs a solo show has won the large market award. Ms. DeYoung, 38, also hosts the "New Country Video" show on Maryland Public Television.
FEATURES
By Jill Rosen and The Baltimore Sun | May 11, 2012
Baltimore's own Stacy Keibler was front and center Thursday night for her boyfriend George Clooney's record-breaking fundraising fete for President Obama. She may have missed being at Clooney's side for the recent White House Correspondent's dinner. And she may have missed that state dinner that he attended a few months ago. But, ending speculation (at least for the moment) that the two of them are on the rocks, she wasn't going to miss this. Guests paid $40,000 each to be there.
NEWS
June 15, 1994
The state visit of Emperor Akihito and Empress Michiko of Japan testifies to the growing importance of the American-Japanese relationship. It is not the White House making this point, but the Chrysanthemum Throne. The visit is Japan's gesture, and the audience to whom it is aimed is the Japanese people back home.While the ceremonial tour helps in healing passions that remain from World War II, this is no great breakthrough. Akihito and Michiko are modern people who have been to this country six times previously.
NEWS
By Jules Witcover | December 1, 2009
Americans love a good hoax. That's why the outlandish stunt by those uninvited guests at the latest White House state dinner has amused as well as perplexed viewers rushing to network and cable news and the Internet for more details. Along with all the chuckles over the audacity of it have come solemn concerns about what might have happened had the publicity-questing couple turned out to be closet disciples of Osama bin Laden or some other imaginative terrorist leader. The Secret Service, commissioned to insulate and protect the president, has a big, fat order of egg on its face.
FEATURES
By Susan Watters and Susan Watters,Contributing Writer Fairchild Publications | September 22, 1993
The Clinton administration may be lurching from one political issue to another, but on an especially treacherous bit of turf -- the White House dinner party -- the Clintons are smooth operators.Using a down-home, informal but very canny approach, Hillary Rodham Clinton is recouping political capital with a clever mix of guests and a style that takes some of the starch out of stuffed-shirt Washington entertaining.White House invitations now arrive just a few days in advance, the guest lists are as varied as the party settings, the president loves to show off his study to whoever is around, and rarely is there a guest of honor.
NEWS
By Rob Kasper and Rob Kasper,rob.kasper@baltrsun.com | November 9, 2008
The new Washington home of the Obama family comes with a nice feature, a chef in the basement. Walter Scheib was that chef from 1994 to 2005, cooking for the first families of Bill Clinton and George W. Bush. He orchestrated elaborate state dinners, but a central component of the job is feeding the family. Mealtime at the White House should, he said, "be an island of sanity in an abnormal world." Scheib grew up in the Washington, D.C., suburbs and spent a year at the University of Maryland before graduating from the Culinary Institute of America.
NEWS
By Ellen Gamerman and Ellen Gamerman,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | September 4, 2001
WASHINGTON - Before the silverware is polished, the menu chosen and the flowers arranged, each White House marks its first state dinner with tradition of a different sort: a summit over the guest list. When President and Laura Bush hold their first state dinner tomorrow, no one will be sitting there by accident - considering that teams adept in all matters political, diplomatic and social have agonized for weeks over the invitations. The event, a banquet in honor of President Vicente Fox of Mexico, features a guest list designed with precision - an evening plotted like a military action, but with cleavage and cocktails.
NEWS
November 22, 1997
THE TRUE SCANDAL in the Clinton White House, to hear some tell, is the antediluvian format of guest lists at state dinners. One line describes the accomplishment or reason-for-being-there of the invited guest, and none -- zilch, nada -- about the escort, the person on that person's arm. Just imagine!So, at the state dinner for President Jiang Zemin of China, Peter A. Kann was identified as chairman of Dow Jones and the Wall Street Journal but Karen Elliott House, the person with him, was left undescribed.
NEWS
By Dan Thanh Dang and Dan Thanh Dang,SUN STAFF | June 5, 1997
State officials have declared that a committee chaired by Annapolis mayoral hopeful Carl O. Snowden violated no law by not registering its annual Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. fund-raising dinner as a charity.A letter to Snowden from the Office of the Secretary of State says that because the committee does not indicate its "Keeping the Dream Alive" dinner is for "charitable purposes, tax-deductible or is a charitable contribution," the group does not have to register with the state Charitable Organizations Division.
NEWS
October 18, 1994
FORGET about "Hon man." Pretty soon, they'll have to change the sign up on the parkway to "Welcome to Baltimore. . . Howdy." That is, if this town gets any more country.Our congratulations to WPOC disc jockey Laurie DeYoung, who was honored as the "large market radio personality of the year" at this month's Country Music Association Awards in Nashville. It is thought to be the first time a woman who performs a solo show has won the large market award. Ms. DeYoung, 38, also hosts the "New Country Video" show on Maryland Public Television.
NEWS
June 15, 1994
The state visit of Emperor Akihito and Empress Michiko of Japan testifies to the growing importance of the American-Japanese relationship. It is not the White House making this point, but the Chrysanthemum Throne. The visit is Japan's gesture, and the audience to whom it is aimed is the Japanese people back home.While the ceremonial tour helps in healing passions that remain from World War II, this is no great breakthrough. Akihito and Michiko are modern people who have been to this country six times previously.
NEWS
By Dan Thanh Dang and Dan Thanh Dang,SUN STAFF | June 5, 1997
State officials have declared that a committee chaired by Annapolis mayoral hopeful Carl O. Snowden violated no law by not registering its annual Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. fund-raising dinner as a charity.A letter to Snowden from the Office of the Secretary of State says that because the committee does not indicate its "Keeping the Dream Alive" dinner is for "charitable purposes, tax-deductible or is a charitable contribution," the group does not have to register with the state Charitable Organizations Division.
NEWS
By Rob Kasper and Rob Kasper,rob.kasper@baltrsun.com | November 9, 2008
The new Washington home of the Obama family comes with a nice feature, a chef in the basement. Walter Scheib was that chef from 1994 to 2005, cooking for the first families of Bill Clinton and George W. Bush. He orchestrated elaborate state dinners, but a central component of the job is feeding the family. Mealtime at the White House should, he said, "be an island of sanity in an abnormal world." Scheib grew up in the Washington, D.C., suburbs and spent a year at the University of Maryland before graduating from the Culinary Institute of America.
FEATURES
By Susan Watters and Susan Watters,Contributing Writer Fairchild Publications | September 22, 1993
The Clinton administration may be lurching from one political issue to another, but on an especially treacherous bit of turf -- the White House dinner party -- the Clintons are smooth operators.Using a down-home, informal but very canny approach, Hillary Rodham Clinton is recouping political capital with a clever mix of guests and a style that takes some of the starch out of stuffed-shirt Washington entertaining.White House invitations now arrive just a few days in advance, the guest lists are as varied as the party settings, the president loves to show off his study to whoever is around, and rarely is there a guest of honor.
NEWS
February 3, 1993
Those who thought Hillary Rodham Clinton was too much of a feminist and professional to stand the famous heat in the White House kitchen now know better.In addition to being in charge of the health care task force and also serving as adviser on policy and personnel for the administration, she has announced that she will be running the household at 1600 Pennsylvania Avenue. She may not personally rattle any pots and pans, but, like a few First Ladies before her, she is going to put her stamp on the cuisine.
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