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By Erin Cox and The Baltimore Sun | September 25, 2014
Republican Larry Hogan urged state and federal investigators Thursday to probe the possible connection between large political donations to the Democratic Governors Association and the award of Maryland state contracts to donors. Hogan, the GOP nominee for governor, also called on federal investigators to widen their audit of Maryland's health exchange to examine whether state tax dollars were misspent on the faulty online insurance marketplace. He convened a news conference Thursday to allege what he called a pattern of "suspicious" donations and suggest that his opponent, Lt. Gov. Anthony G. Brown, might be the beneficiary.
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NEWS
By Erin Cox and The Baltimore Sun | September 25, 2014
Republican Larry Hogan urged state and federal investigators Thursday to probe the possible connection between large political donations to the Democratic Governors Association and the award of Maryland state contracts to donors. Hogan, the GOP nominee for governor, also called on federal investigators to widen their audit of Maryland's health exchange to examine whether state tax dollars were misspent on the faulty online insurance marketplace. He convened a news conference Thursday to allege what he called a pattern of "suspicious" donations and suggest that his opponent, Lt. Gov. Anthony G. Brown, might be the beneficiary.
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NEWS
August 8, 1993
Finally, Maryland's state legislators are going to take a look at whether there have been improprieties in the controversies surrounding the awarding of state contracts. Our only question: What took them so long?It has been clear for some time that influence was exerted on state officials in a number of major contract awards. In some cases, the regular procurement process was altered; in other cases, the entire competitive bidding procedure was junked. Abnormalities in these big state procurement contracts have become the norm rather than the exception.
NEWS
By Doug Donovan, The Baltimore Sun | July 15, 2014
Maryland's Board of Public Works, a panel that includes the governor and other top state officials, did little to scrutinize millions in contracts it awarded in recent years to the financially strapped operator of a group home where a 10-year-old boy died this month, records show. And state agency officials who recommended LifeLine for various contracts from 2011 through September did not mention the company's fiscal and quality problems to the board - even as they touted a new process to reward only top-quality contractors.
NEWS
November 30, 1993
No, in answer to the headlined question, there's no out-and-out awarding of state contracts to friends and allies of the administration in Annapolis. But evidence is mounting that a subtle form of favoritism has crept into Maryland's procurement system in which bid specifications are routinely tailored to steer business to selected companies.There's considerable sentiment among legislators on a special task force that this sort of "steering" happened in the awarding of the controversial $65 million lottery computer contract, the follow-on $49 million keno contract, the $30 million statewide fiber optics proposal and the $10 million telephone PBX replacement contract.
NEWS
By Laura Smitherman and Laura Smitherman,laura.smitherman@baltsun.com | May 21, 2009
Maryland officials have barred Alan B. Fabian, an entrepreneur and one-time Republican fundraiser now in federal prison, from doing business with the state for an indefinite period. Fabian, who lived in Cockeysville, pleaded guilty last year to mail and tax fraud in connection with a $32 million fraud. The Board of Public Works, a three-member panel with purview over state contracts, approved the action Wednesday without discussion. Fabian had been notified of the proceeding and did not request a hearing, according to board records.
NEWS
By BARRY RASCOVAR | June 27, 1993
Maryland's procurement laws -- once a model for other statesseeking integrity in awarding contracts -- are in tatters. Politically connected officials and lobbyists have blown gaping holes in the laws.It is a throwback to the pre-Watergate years when state contracts got handed out on the basis of who you knew. What's happening now is all too familiar. Influential businessmen with connections in the State House maneuver into position to benefit from contract awards.It is a corrupt bargain.
BUSINESS
By Michael Dresser and Michael Dresser,SUN STAFF | August 15, 1996
Maryland's state government will apparently move to ease the requirements for small businesses to bid on mid-sized state contracts after the Board of Public Works chastised budget officials yesterday for requiring a $100,000 performance bond on a contract worth $113,321.Officials of the board and the Department of Budget and Management told the board's members that they would deliver some proposals to lessen the requirements as early as the board's next meeting on Sept. 4.That promise came as board members reluctantly approved the award of a contract to Language Learning Enterprises Inc. of Washington to provide language interpreter services for emergency communications such as 911 lines.
NEWS
By John W. Frece and John W. Frece,Sun Staff Writer | March 23, 1995
A divided House committee rejected yesterday Gov. Parris N. Glendening's bid to nearly double the state goal for participation by minority-owned firms in state contracts.Instead, the Commerce and Government Matters Committee voted for a much more modest change, moving to the House floor a bill that would change the state's minimum goal for minority firm participation to 12 percent from 10 percent.Mr. Glendening had sought an increase to 18 percent. Administration lobbyists and other supporters of the governor's proposal say anything less than 18 percent will render the state's Minority Business Enterprise program vulnerable to legal challenge.
NEWS
By Dennis O'Brien and Dennis O'Brien,SUN STAFF | April 11, 2000
A Baltimore County judge has ruled that an advocacy group for the blind is not entitled to preferential treatment when the state buys up to $5 million in office supplies. Circuit Judge John F. Fader II said in an opinion released yesterday that the procurement law giving Blind Industries and Services of Maryland preference in state contracts does not apply to the office supply pact that it sought last summer. The law says that the state should buy supplies and services from the agency whenever possible.
NEWS
By Doug Donovan, The Baltimore Sun | July 12, 2014
The recent death of a 10-year-old disabled foster child at an Anne Arundel County group home was just the latest in a series of problems at LifeLine, the state contractor that has been paid millions in taxpayer funds to care for "medically fragile" individuals, a two-month investigation by The Baltimore Sun has found. Even before Damaud Martin's death on July 2, LifeLine had struggled for years to provide around-the-clock care for its residents - adults and foster children often confined to a bed or wheelchair by paralysis, cerebral palsy and other disabilities.
NEWS
By Colin Campbell, The Baltimore Sun | April 29, 2014
Though the governor's race has already featured attack ads, the state's top candidates focused more on their own platforms than their opponents' at a Prince George's County forum Monday night. Attorney General Douglas Gansler defended his comments about Lt. Gov. Anthony Brown's leadership experience that drew the ire of veteran groups backing Brown. Gansler said he had implied that Brown's time in the military didn't count as a real job. "I didn't say a disparaging syllable about veterans," Gansler said.
NEWS
Erin Cox and Scott Dance and The Baltimore Sun | February 24, 2014
Maryland has terminated its contracts with the company hired to build and operate the state's online health exchange, which has been riddled with problems since its launch in October. The board overseeing the exchange voted Sunday night to sever ties with Noridian Healthcare Solutions, and the state reserves the right to take the company to court for damages, officials said Monday. Critics of the botched rollout said Noridian should have been replaced long before now, and they renewed calls for an investigation into why Maryland stumbled with implementation of the Affordable Care Act. The website is so flawed that state officials are considering abandoning it after open enrollment ends next month.
NEWS
Erin Cox and The Baltimore Sun | February 19, 2014
Lt. Gov.  Anthony G. Brown released an eight-point plan Wednesday that he said will increase the number of minority-owned businesses that win state contracts. Maryland already has one of the highest goals in the nation to award state business to companies owned and operated by women and minorities, firms that have traditionally struggled to land such contracts. Brown's plan, which is part of his bid for governor, suggests making it easier for businesses to get the certification required to compete for those contracts, as well as create new programs that encourage private companies to hire firms minority owned contracts.
NEWS
By BRIAN WITTE | July 12, 2012
ANNAPOLIS, Md. (AP) — Gov. Martin O'Malley said Wednesday he wants to bring in outside help to review Maryland's procurement process for state contracts after repeated problems that agencies have experienced in bidding out for services over the years. O'Malley's comments at a Board of Public Works meeting were made as the board extended a $4.3 million contract extension for a company to run a call center that takes questions about child support payments. The extension is needed because the process that was used to hire a new contractor was found to be deeply flawed by the Maryland State Board of Contract Appeals.
BUSINESS
By Gus G. Sentementes, The Baltimore Sun | June 11, 2012
The National Labor Relations Board has sided with about 350 taxi drivers at Baltimore-Washington International Thurgood Marshall Airport, ruling that they should be classified as employees, not independent contractors, by the company that holds the state contract to operate cabs at the airport. The drivers, who work for BWI Taxi Management Inc., have said for years that they should be treated as employees and given access to benefits such as unemployment and workers' compensation insurance.
NEWS
By C. Fraser Smith | May 26, 1996
IN THE BAD OLD days, it sometimes seemed, big state contracts were won in Maryland by the businessman who promised the biggest kickback.Those days brought shame. A former governor, Spiro T. Agnew, resigned the vice presidency amid charges that he had taken bribes while serving as Baltimore County executive.In the dreary aftermath of his fall, lawyers and bureaucrats came up with an intricate bidding system designed to protect the taxpayer, the state's good name and well-meaning public officials who find themselves, almost inevitably, in compromising situations.
BUSINESS
By Hanah Cho, The Baltimore Sun | April 11, 2011
It wasn't always easy for Tracey Rhoten to make inroads in the male-dominated construction industry as a female executive of a concrete company. But being a state-certified minority business has helped create more opportunities for her firm, Aaron's Concrete Pumping in Eldersburg. That distinction has gotten her subcontracting jobs on state-funded construction projects since 2009 and has led to a 25 percent increase in revenue, said Rhoten, who founded the firm with her brother in 2003.
NEWS
The Baltimore Sun | February 3, 2012
WEATHER Today's forecast calls for sunny skies with a high near 50 degrees. It is expected to be mostly clear tonight, with a low temperature around 35 degrees. FROM LAST NIGHT... McDevitt out as CEO of Medifast : Medifast Inc., an Owings Mills-based maker and provider of weight-loss programs, said Thursday it would replace its chief executive officer next week with the company's board chairman. Four arrested in December killing at Towson Town Center : Four men, ranging in age from 19 to 44, were arrested this week and charged with first-degree murder.
NEWS
By Annie Linskey, The Baltimore Sun | February 2, 2012
Companies seeking lucrative state contracts and business deals in Maryland made five- and six-figure contributions in recent months to a Democratic governors group led by Gov. Martin O'Malley, federal records show. Firms making large gifts to the Democratic Governors Association in the last six months of 2011 include bidders for a $2.4 billion state employee health contract, a $56 million deal to rebuild highway rest stops and the license to run Baltimore's slots casino. O'Malley, who has been the association's chairman since December 2010, has said the contributions have nothing to do with his decisions as governor.
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