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State Budget Cuts

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NEWS
October 15, 2008
While Gov. Martin O'Malley has shown leadership in addressing issues of importance to the developmental disabilities community, he is now considering state budget cuts for the fiscal year totaling some $250 million ("State weighs cuts in critical needs," Oct. 9). Among those is eliminating a 1.2 percent rise in the state's reimbursement rate for community-based developmental disabilities programs. While everyone undoubtedly will bear some of the burden of the budget cuts, the developmental disabilities community is particularly vulnerable because of years of underfunding.
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NEWS
By Julie Bykowicz, The Baltimore Sun | March 14, 2011
With state lawmakers preparing to make decisions in the coming weeks on budget cuts and pension reform, thousands of union members marched Monday evening on Annapolis to send a message. The marchers were met by a counterprotest, organized by tea party activists, of several dozen taxpayers asking for deeper state budget cuts. The union group was large enough to cut off traffic in downtown Annapolis. Chanting "keep the promise" and "enough is enough," they decried efforts by Gov. Martin O'Malley and legislators to change employee contributions to their retirement plans, a move that officials say would save the state an estimated $100 million next year.
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NEWS
By Paul Shread and Paul Shread,Staff writer | December 20, 1991
County Executive Robert R. Neall asked county legislators yesterday to fight massive cuts in state aid proposed for local governments by Gov. William Donald Schaefer."
NEWS
By Larry Carson, The Baltimore Sun | January 27, 2011
The recession's debilitating effects on the private and public economies may dominate the news, but Howard County Executive Ken Ulman banished the gloomy talk in his fifth annual "State of the County" speech to about 400 people at a Chamber of Commerce luncheon Tuesday. He did acknowledge the economic malaise, but stayed upbeat despite the threat of another round of state budget cuts and still-meager revenues. "We know we have a way to go before exiting the tunnel," Ulman said in opening.
NEWS
By Monica Norton and Monica Norton,Staff Writer | August 4, 1992
With three new members, the Board of Education will kick off its new year tomorrow the same way it ended the last one -- discussing budget cuts.The board, with new members Michael Pace, Joseph Foster and student member Jay Witcher, will decide on how the school system will deal with recently announced state budget cuts to non-mandated school programs.State officials announced July 15 that the county would be losing $305,122 for such non-mandated programs as the highly touted Maryland's Tomorrow, for students at risk of dropping out of school.
NEWS
By Larry Carson and Larry Carson,Staff Writer | September 15, 1992
The bean counters have counted, and Baltimore Count officials have a pleasant surprise -- a $4.9 million budget surplus for the fiscal year that ended June 30.But Hayden administration officials say the money won't come close to covering the $20 million to $30 million the county expects to lose this year when the state cuts aid to local governments in an effort to deal with its own budget deficit.County Executive Roger B. Hayden said that without the cash to cover state cuts, he is preparing to reduce the size of county government still further and will look at all county programs and services.
NEWS
By Cindy Parr and Cindy Parr,Contributing writer | September 25, 1991
Sybil Dukehart's days are full, with reading and a little crocheting.But even more enjoyable, the 92-year-old says, are the visitors she receives.Especially one four-legged friend named Happy who visits her weekly at the Carroll Lutheran Village Health Care Center in Westminster,where she has lived for five years."
NEWS
By Mike Klingaman and Mike Klingaman,Staff Writer | January 25, 1993
In sub-freezing cold, Doris, a 45-year-old heroin addict, waits in line for hours outside a drug-counseling center in Baltimore.No luck. Not enough openings. She's told to go home and come back in a week. Doris weeps in frustration. "I've hit bottom and I'm tired. Tired of the streets. Tired of myself. And I can't get help," she says.Like stabs from a blunt needle, state budget cuts caused by the recession have left serious wounds in Maryland's drug treatment efforts.Since 1991, the substance-abuse budget, including federal funds, has decreased from $55.5 million to $50.8 million, closing some clinics and paring many others to the bone.
NEWS
By Monica Norton and Monica Norton,Staff Writer | July 16, 1992
County officials learned yesterday Anne Arundel could lose $2.7 million in the latest round of state budget cuts, a reduction that should have a minimal effect on government operations."
NEWS
August 26, 2009
Perhaps the most troubling aspect of the $454 million in state budget cuts expected to be approved today by the Board of Public Works is the strong possibility that a similar situation will arise again in a matter of months as tax revenue estimates continue to drop. While the impact of the economic recession on Maryland's state government may not be quite as overwhelming as it's been in Sacramento and Albany, the worst may not yet have hit Annapolis. Gov. Martin O'Malley said yesterday that the budget reductions are designed to preserve his administration's priorities as best as possible until a recovery takes hold.
NEWS
By Larry Carson and Larry Carson,larry.carson@baltsun.com | October 24, 2009
Advocates for people with severe disabilities have launched a campaign to reverse $29 million in recent state budget cuts that they contend are hurting an already underfunded, vulnerable community. Supporters are organizing a series of nine public meetings around Maryland and are taking their case to top officials. Gov. Martin O'Malley, who met with advocates for the developmentally disabled this week, has repeatedly pared spending for state agencies and services to keep the budget balanced, and he must close another $2 billion shortfall next year.
NEWS
August 30, 2009
Last week's latest round of budget cuts, a hefty $454 million in reductions that included layoffs, furloughs, and hits to community colleges, health departments, road repair, public safety and local aid, has heightened the urgency to bring slot machines to Maryland as voters approved overwhelmingly last year. The national economic recession is shrinking state and local government faster - and perhaps more painfully - than expected. The potential hundreds of millions of dollars of new revenue generated by slot machines would go a long way toward alleviating that discomfort.
NEWS
August 26, 2009
Perhaps the most troubling aspect of the $454 million in state budget cuts expected to be approved today by the Board of Public Works is the strong possibility that a similar situation will arise again in a matter of months as tax revenue estimates continue to drop. While the impact of the economic recession on Maryland's state government may not be quite as overwhelming as it's been in Sacramento and Albany, the worst may not yet have hit Annapolis. Gov. Martin O'Malley said yesterday that the budget reductions are designed to preserve his administration's priorities as best as possible until a recovery takes hold.
NEWS
August 24, 2009
Given the drastic, across-the-board gains in student achievement Baltimore City public schools have registered over the past two years, few would deny schools chief Andres A. Alonso deserves the $29,000 bonus the school board awarded him this year. Yes, that's a lot of money, especially coming on top of his $250,000 annual salary, which is among the highest in the state for school superintendents. But an approximately 10 percent bonus isn't out of line for a CEO responsible for a $1.1 billion system with thousands of employees, and it's actually considerably less than that for a comparable position in the private sector.
NEWS
By Liz Bowie and Liz Bowie,liz.bowie@baltsun.com | February 17, 2009
Maryland schools are expected to get about $1.1 billion over the next two years from the federal stimulus package that President Barack Obama is scheduled to sign today, an amount that is expected to offset any state reductions in education aid needed to balance the budget. Most of the money - about $721 million - is intended to prevent cuts to school programs, giving the state significant flexibility in how it is used. Education advocates had worried that the aid would be earmarked in ways that would have prevented Maryland from using it to reverse planned budget cuts.
NEWS
By JEAN MARBELLA and JEAN MARBELLA,jean.marbella@baltsun.com | October 16, 2008
Maybe it's because we're already accustomed to talking about hundreds of billions of taxpayer dollars as casually as if it were pocket change. A $250 billion outlay to prop up the country's biggest banks? Big deal, when we're already committed to spend a total of $700 billion to bail out the markets. So when the state Board of Public Works cut nearly $300 million in spending yesterday, for a moment it seemed as if they were talking about coins in between the sofa cushions. As in: Wake us up when you start talking real money.
NEWS
By Sherrie Ruhl and Sherrie Ruhl,Staff Writer | September 27, 1992
The school system will have to do some hard negotiating for more county money to offset losses in state aid, Harford's superintendent says."Be prepared for cuts. There will be a tremendous financial challenge to hold on to what we have," said Superintendent Ray R. Keech, speaking Monday night at the school board's first educational forum this school year.The county school system, which accounts for about half of the county budget, expects to lose at least $2.3 million in state aid this year.
NEWS
October 3, 1991
United Way of Central Maryland is offering First Call for Help, an information and referral service for people seeking job counseling, housing, food, shelter and other forms of assistance.The number for the 24-hour service is 685-0525 in the Baltimore area, or 1-800-492-0618 toll-free, or TYY (for the deaf) 685-2159.The United Way is particularly encouraging state employees who will lose their jobs because of the new state budget cuts to take advantage of the service.
NEWS
October 15, 2008
While Gov. Martin O'Malley has shown leadership in addressing issues of importance to the developmental disabilities community, he is now considering state budget cuts for the fiscal year totaling some $250 million ("State weighs cuts in critical needs," Oct. 9). Among those is eliminating a 1.2 percent rise in the state's reimbursement rate for community-based developmental disabilities programs. While everyone undoubtedly will bear some of the burden of the budget cuts, the developmental disabilities community is particularly vulnerable because of years of underfunding.
NEWS
By From Sun news services | August 28, 2008
Newport News, Va. - A Virginia plan to better monitor the fishing of Chesapeake Bay blue crabs by tagging crab pots is on hold because of expected state spending cuts. The governors of Maryland and Virginia agreed in April to take steps to reduce by one-third the number of female blue crabs harvested from the bay. As part of its effort, Virginia ordered a 30 percent reduction in "peeler" pots and a 15 percent reduction in hard-crab pots. To help enforce those limits, the Virginia Marine Resources Commission said watermen would be required to put a new colored tag on each of their crab pots.
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