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NEWS
April 15, 1992
Anne Arundel County Sun reporters Jay Apperson and JoAnna Daemmrich have won first place in the Maryland State Bar Association's annual Gavel Awards competition for an article they wrote on abuse of the elderly."
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NEWS
By Justin George, The Baltimore Sun | February 25, 2013
A judge delivered a major blow Monday to the state's case against two men accused of fatally slashing the throats of three children nine years ago, ruling that the testimony of a key witness is inadmissible. As prosecutors try for a third time next month to convict Policarpio Espinoza Perez, 31, and Adan Canela, 26, they'll have to do so without some important evidence and witnesses they used to secure a 2006 guilty verdict that was later thrown out by Maryland's top court. Circuit Judge M. Brooke Murdock told the prosecution that it may not use the statements of the woman who said in the earlier trials that she drove the men from work to the crime scene.
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NEWS
By Elaine Tassy and Elaine Tassy,SUN STAFF | June 14, 1996
Make room for the new Miss Manners of Maryland lawyers.Baltimore County Circuit Judge Barbara Kerr Howe, slated to become president of the Maryland State Bar Association tomorrow, says lawyers might need a statewide code of civility.Such a code, which could be patterned after those created by bar associations in Baltimore and Baltimore County, would, for example, ask lawyers to return calls to each other and cooperate with opposing counsel when documents are sought."It's just that they would be courteous," Howe said, adding that a committee will look into the matter, which would ensure that localities have the same rules.
NEWS
By Tricia Bishop, The Baltimore Sun | March 14, 2011
Baltimore's new chief deputy state's attorney may not be a member of the Maryland bar, but it turns out that's not a problem so long as he's doing administrative work and not practicing law, according to several oversight agencies. "There's nothing that outright says this is prohibited," said Kay Winfree, chief deputy attorney general. The Maryland Constitution requires that regional state's attorneys be "admitted to practice Law in this State," but it doesn't say much at all about deputies, which means George Hazel is in the clear.
NEWS
By Norris P. West and Norris P. West,Staff Writer | June 14, 1992
Roger A. Perkins, the new Maryland State Bar Association president, says his organization will seek more input from the state's minority lawyers to broaden its perspective on legal matters.Mr. Perkins, 49, who was installed as president of the 15,500-lawyer group yesterday, said one of his three main goals will be to recruit minority lawyers as active members and get them to serve on bar association committees."I think we need the perspective of minority lawyers," he said during a break in the state bar association's three-day convention last week in Ocean City.
NEWS
By Andrea K. Walker and Andrea K. Walker,SUN STAFF | June 15, 2003
It wasn't so long ago that as a black attorney Harry S. Johnson would have been shunned by the white inner circle of Maryland lawyers. Now attorneys from all backgrounds have chosen the partner with Whiteford, Taylor and Preston to represent their interests as head of the state's largest organization representing lawyers. Johnson was sworn in as the first African-American president of the Maryland State Bar Association yesterday, a milestone for the 20,800-member organization that until 1958 didn't allow minorities in its ranks.
NEWS
May 29, 2000
THIS IS HOW Bill Clinton's apparent misconduct in the Paula Jones case should have been handled all along. In Arkansas. With nothing more at stake than his ability to practice law. Finally, we have an appropriate response to Mr. Clinton's inappropriate behavior. Of course, to get to this reasoned conclusion, the citizenry had to suffer through an agonizing federally funded investigation and impeachment trial two years ago. That whole process was a sham, because Mr. Clinton's behavior didn't rise to the level of "high crimes and misdemeanors" required by the Constitution to remove a president.
BUSINESS
By Mark Hyman and Mark Hyman,SUN STAFF | October 21, 1996
Stung by criticism of its tepid response to February's fatal rail accident in Silver Spring, the Maryland State Bar Association has unveiled a new "Mass Disaster Plan" designed to do more to protect victims from overly aggressive lawyers.Major points in the new plan are a legal disaster hot line and an eight-page booklet of advice about hiring a lawyer after a major crash.At the time of the train accident, a less ambitious disaster plan called for the state's bar officials to rush to the scene of an accident and to offer victims advice about hiring a lawyer, among other things.
BUSINESS
January 25, 1996
Paul D. Bekman, a Baltimore lawyer and former president of the Baltimore City Bar Association, has been nominated as the next president-elect of the Maryland State Bar Association.The nomination Tuesday night by the state bar's board of governors means Mr. Bekman is virtually assured of becoming president in June 1997.He will be officially declared president-elect in June, barring an unlikely challenge.Mr. Bekman, 49, would follow the current president, Robert T. Gonzales, and incoming president, Baltimore County Circuit Judge Barbara Kerr Howe, whose term will begin in five months.
BUSINESS
By Mark Hyman and Mark Hyman,SUN STAFF | March 5, 1996
Some Maryland State Bar Association officials are red-faced about the organization's response -- or lack of one -- to last month's fiery train accident in Silver Spring.Seven years ago, the state bar was one of the first in the country to deal with such tragedies, creating a "disaster information plan" to shield accident victims and their families from unscrupulous lawyers.But in the hours after the crash, as some attorneys canvassed the crash scene, gathering up clients and their multimillion-dollar lawsuits, the state bar was strangely absent.
NEWS
By ANDREA F. SIEGEL and ANDREA F. SIEGEL,SUN REPORTER | July 14, 2006
A Montgomery County Republican filed a lawsuit yesterday challenging the qualifications of Montgomery County Council member Thomas E. Perez to run for Maryland attorney general. Perez lacks the 10 years of Maryland legal experience required by the state constitution, despite an opinion to the contrary from Attorney General J. Joseph Curran Jr., argued Stephen N. Abrams, a Montgomery school board member who is a candidate for state comptroller. Filed in Anne Arundel County Circuit Court, the lawsuit comes two months before the Democratic primary in September.
NEWS
By LAURA CADIZ and LAURA CADIZ,SUN REPORTER | October 29, 2005
When clients visit Bob Bohan's Annapolis law office, his priorities soon become apparent. There's an 8-by-10-inch photo of his foxhound, Maddy, displayed prominently in a cherry wood frame at the edge of his desk. A much smaller photo of his wife, Barbara, is on the other side of the desk. So it should come as no surprise that Bohan is carving out a niche in the growing field known as animal law, advising his elderly, two-legged clients on issues involving their furred dependents. "As people are growing older and in some cases outliving children, I've seen a number of cases where the pets become the most important players in providing companionship," said Bohan.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | August 12, 2005
Edwin H. W. Harlan Jr., a retired Harford County District Court judge and former state's attorney, died Tuesday of Alzheimer's disease at Charlestown Retirement Community in Catonsville. He was 84. Born and raised in Bel Air, Judge Harlan had descended from a Harford County family involved in the law. His father was a Bel Air attorney and his grandfather had been a Harford County judge. After graduating in 1940 from Episcopal High School in Alexandria, Va., he enrolled at Washington & Lee University in Lexington, Va., where he completed his freshman year before enlisting in the Army in 1942.
NEWS
By Frank Langfitt and Frank Langfitt,SUN STAFF | July 8, 2004
Propelling Maryland into the national debate over the nature of marriage, nine same-sex couples filed suit yesterday in Baltimore Circuit Court to overturn a law prohibiting gay marriage, saying it violates the state constitution. The plaintiffs, following a strategy similar to the one used to legalize gay marriage in Massachusetts, sued Baltimore City Clerk Frank Conaway and clerks in four other Maryland jurisdictions for refusing to issue them marriage licenses last week. In the 39-page complaint, the plaintiffs argue that a 1973 Maryland law that says only a marriage between a man and a woman is valid violates constitutional protections of due process, equality and prohibitions against sex discrimination.
NEWS
By Jason Song and Jason Song,SUN STAFF | March 18, 2004
Annapolis housing authority employees are not allowed to unionize because the agency does not have the right to engage in collective bargaining, according to a legal opinion presented at a housing authority meeting yesterday. Representatives of the American Federation of State, County and Municipal Employees Chapter 67 are trying to organize about 45 authority employees, including janitors and secretaries. The federal agency oversees nearly 1,100 housing units in the city. But a March 11 letter from a private attorney hired by the authority said the agency does not have the explicit authority required under state law for it to enter into binding collective bargaining agreements.
NEWS
By Luciana Lopez and Luciana Lopez,SUN STAFF | June 15, 2003
Harford County lawyer Cornelius "Neil" Helfrich took the reins as president-elect of the Maryland State Bar Association yesterday at the group's annual meeting in Ocean City. The one-year position lets the officeholder prepare for a one-year term as president of the group. Helfrich said he would spend the year "priming the pump" under Baltimore's Harry S. Johnson, who became president yesterday. "The president-elect is sort of a sponge absorbing all of what goes on around you," said Helfrich.
BUSINESS
December 27, 1995
Despite a glut of lawyers, the legal needs of many Maryland residents are going unmet.That's the message of a telephone survey commissioned by the Maryland State Bar Association.The telephone poll canvassed 639 middle-class households across the state, with incomes from $15,000 to $45,000.Of those participating, 15 percent said they were experiencing a legal problem related to housing. But only 5 percent said they had contacted a lawyer, and none of them had retained a lawyer.Consumer and employment problems were cited by 11 percent of those in the poll.
BUSINESS
By Mark Hyman and Mark Hyman,SUN STAFF | January 13, 1996
When should an attorney's classroom education end? On the last day of law school or the last day in law practice? It's a hotly debated question among attorneys, and one that a Republican state senator has joined by sponsoring legislation to make legal education courses mandatory for Maryland's 22,000 lawyers.To keep their licenses, lawyers would be required to complete 30 hours of legal courses every two years, according to the bill submitted by Sen. Martin G. Madden, a Howard County Republican.
NEWS
By Andrea K. Walker and Andrea K. Walker,SUN STAFF | June 15, 2003
It wasn't so long ago that as a black attorney Harry S. Johnson would have been shunned by the white inner circle of Maryland lawyers. Now attorneys from all backgrounds have chosen the partner with Whiteford, Taylor and Preston to represent their interests as head of the state's largest organization representing lawyers. Johnson was sworn in as the first African-American president of the Maryland State Bar Association yesterday, a milestone for the 20,800-member organization that until 1958 didn't allow minorities in its ranks.
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | June 13, 2002
An Annapolis lawyer will take over Saturday as president of the Maryland State Bar Association, three days after another Anne Arundel County lawyer receives an award for her work. James P. Nolan, 54, said he has set several goals for his yearlong term as president of the 20,500-member organization. "My focus is going to be on communications," he said. Nolan said he wants the organization to improve its relationship with everyone from judges to local lawyer groups to state lawmakers. "We are looking to become more of a resource for the legislature, as we watch the number of attorneys in the legislature dwindle," he said.
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